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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Let's Use Linux and Android SDK for Better Android App Development Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 6:59am
Story Randa Meetings Interview Four: Myriam Schweingruber Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 10:17pm
Story Nouveau vs. NVIDIA Power Monitoring Results Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 10:08pm
Story Linux Advocates in the Wild Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:32pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:04pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:03pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:02pm
Story VolksPC wants to crowdfund an Android/Debian Linux PC Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 8:49pm
Story Is the cloudbook the future of Linux? Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 12:37pm

Ex-Red-Hat brains decide to ride cloud

theregister.co.uk: Cloud computing is causing IT vendors to change their pitches on the off chance that cloud could actually end up generating some money. And to that end, rPath is shifting gears with version 5.0 of its rBuilder.

First Android netbooks surface

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Guanzhou, China-based Skytone announced the Alpha 680, a 533MHz ARM11-based netbook with a 7-inch touchscreen that appears to be the first commercial netbook running Android.

Firefox 3.0.9 security release now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of the Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing security and stability process, Firefox 3.0.9 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux users as a free download from getfirefox.com.

Red Hat and Fedora are Poles Apart

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: While Fedora is too bleeding edge, Red Hat (and Centos) is too conservative. They are poles apart and don't offer anything in between.

“We’re Linux” Videos: Placing Freedom Before Practicality?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: The Linux Foundation recently announced the winner and runners up of the “We’re Linux” video contest that it sponsored as a response to the well-known promotional campaigns by Microsoft and Apple. The selections are professional and inspiring, but I worry that their focus on “freedom” limits their effectiveness. Here’s why.

Abiword is Awesome

Filed under
Software

omegamormegil.wordpress: Abiword has just become my new favorite word processor. It’s always been nice for being so quick and low on resources, but the 2.6 release of Abiword has added two new features which have pushed it over the top for me.

Why I Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: I am not a programmer. Yet Linux is built on the philosophical principle of freely sharing source code. This is how those who create Linux frequently advocate it. But if I'm not a programmer, and source code therefore means little to me, why do I use Linux?

Open source VS proprietary support

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: One of the biggest arguments people try to use against Open source programs is the supposed lack of support. In general I have found that support for open source programs is equal to and ofttimes better than that provided by proprietary companies.

The offensive Microsoft anti-Linux netbook offensive

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Ever since the unexpected advent of netbooks Microsoft has been working to push Linux out. Microsoft have reminded us they’re a proprietary company with the offensive Windows 7 Starter Edition being limited to three apps only. Are they trying to insult us or what?

Also: Will Microsoft blow its netbook lead with Windows 7 crippleware?

CentOS 5.3 Has Keen Focus on Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: CentOS is based on Red Hat's Enterprise Linux source packages and shares in Red Hat Enterprise Linux's recent virtualization, app dev, security and storage improvements. Many of the enhancements in CentOS 5.3 come in the area of virtualization, targeted largely at scalability on large host machines.

4 Minimal Linux Desktop Distributions

Filed under
Linux

productivelinux.com: I’ve been researching concepts of minimalism as it applies to computing and personal productivity, and I’m convinced that in many cases, a minimal setup can really help you get more done.

How To Upgrade From Ext3 To Ext4 Without Formatting

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: I did mention that the new filesystem - ext4 is stable, fast and backward compatible with ext2 and ext3. Today, we will look at how you can upgrade your existing ext3 filesystem to ext4 without reformating your hard disk.

Aaron Seigo Talks About KDE's Past and Future

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

itmanagement.earthweb: Aaron Seigo is one of the most public faces of the KDE desktop. Not only is he a long-time developer, but, for the past three years, he has been president of KDE e.V.. Now nearing the end of his time as president, he talked about KDE's recent past and near future, and his role in both.

Red Hat maps open source activity. France is #1

Filed under
OSS

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat today published a new study together with Georgia Tech mapping open source activity across 75 countries. Officially called the Open Source Index (OSI), the final score is made of a number of factors including policies, practices in the Government, Industry, and Community.

Does Debian still matter?

Filed under
Linux

pcauthority.com.au/Blog: Debian was one of the first Linux distributions, and it pioneered much of what we take for granted in Linux systems today. But has Debian had its day?

Is Debian dying?

Filed under
Linux

debaira.blogspot: Debian is certainly the first, large-scale (>1400 developers), global, volunteer created and driven, engineering project whose ambitious concern is nothing less than meeting the needs of all of its users with incisive design effectiveness for an easy to install, general purpose operating system.

Neuros Link: Tuning In HDTV, Using Ubuntu

workswithu.com: I recently came across an Ubuntu-based device that is designed for viewing streaming and local video content on an HDTV. The device in question is the Neuros Link.

10 reasons you should give Ubuntu a try

Filed under
Ubuntu

2indya.com: Here are some of the glaring reasons that would make you pick up a Ubuntu CD and give it a try while keeping your earlier operating system intact.

Lenovo Analyst: Linux on Netbooks Is Doomed

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Because it's only proper to give credit where it's due, Matt Kohut, Worldwide Competitive Analyst for Lenovo, could be spot on in his prediction that Linux will remain a niche market on netbooks.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

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