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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Tablets in Prison Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 11:32pm
Story This Android-based mini-PC could cost less than a dinner for two Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 10:31pm
Story Solus Ditches Adobe Flash, Gets Boot Time Down to 1.4 Seconds Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 10:21pm
Story Ubuntu Touch Gets Full Shell Rotation with Latest Update and So Much More Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 10:18pm
Story PC-BSD Releases Lumina Desktop 0.8.5 Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 10:12pm
Story Fedora Atomic Workstations in Planning Stages Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 10:11pm
Story Ubuntu 15.10 Desktop Updates Bring Fixes for Mir Backend Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 10:02pm
Story Nvidia Is Now Using a New Linux Kernel Module Source Layout Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 9:58pm
Story Red Hat pushing hard beyond Linux in the data center Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 9:50pm
Story Akademy 2015 Keynote: Matthias Kirschner Rianne Schestowitz 15/07/2015 - 9:40pm

5 Things I Like About Opera 10.60 ” Pros – Cons “

Filed under
Software

linuxnov.com: I am not really big fan of Opera web browser for PC, usually used opera on mobile devices and really love it. but the new release Opera 10.60 comes with many new features foe easily use and customize the look of installed Opera version.

Linux Gazette July 2010 (#176):

Filed under
Linux

July 2010 (#176):

* Pixie Chronicles: Part 4 Kickstart, by Henry Grebler
the rest of the install

* Tacco and the Painters (A Fable for the Nineties), by Henry Grebler

* Knoppix Boot From PXE Server - a Simplified Version for Broadcom based NICs, by Krishnaprasad K., Shivaprasad Katta, and Sumitha Bennet

* Procmail/GMail-based spam filtering, by Ben Okopnik

* Linux: The Mom & Pop's Operating System, by Anderson Silva

KDE and Science

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: Free thinkers. Curious people collaborating across borders. Pioneers pushing back the boundaries of what is possible. Teams building upon the work of others. People trying things just to see what happens.

Years After Trial, Reiser Talks Life In Prison

Filed under
Reiser

ktvu.com: Mule Creek State Prison has a sensitive needs facility housing some of the state's most notorious inmates, and those who other inmates might want to harm.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • X.Org Server 1.8.2 Officially Released
  • N-VA using Drupal
  • Red Hat chief’s payday: $9 million
  • GIMP 2.7.1 with new user interface
  • Virtualization on the Ubuntu Desktop: An Overview
  • [FSF] Free Software Supporter -- Issue 27, June 2010
  • Open source logic analyzer software
  • Open Source Sensing Initiatives March Forward
  • Linux Foundation releases Meego for developers
  • Big-screen Kindle gains new screen technology
  • Cisco's second tablet runs Linux, manages home energy use
  • HP closes Palm deal, confirms WebOS tablet
  • Qualcomm Releases Open-Source 2D/3D Kernel Driver
  • Search for Bilski scapegoats targets IBM
  • VTK - 3D computer graphics
  • Open Source: Advocate to Government
  • When Sugar and Semantics Collide
  • New Ulteo OVD v2.5 release available now

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Caching password, user and group on a roaming Debian laptop
  • Get Native Ubuntu Notifications back in Firefox 3.6.6
  • Turning a Photograph into a Polka Dot Image in GIMP
  • SUSE Linux: Install RPM File And Packages
  • How to Automate Your Podcast Downloads with gPodder
  • Loop Through Files In A Directory
  • fix network manager applet missing from notification area in ubuntu
  • Restore the Wubi Ubuntu Bootloader

Opera 10.60 Review

Filed under
Software
  • Opera 10.60 Review
  • Opera 10.6 Arrives With More Speed, New Malware Protection

16 Gorgeous Linux Wallpapers From Pr09studio

Pr09studio guys are also actively contributing for bisigi themes project and they really do have some stunning wallpapers to showcase. So here it goes, 16 beautiful Linux wallpapers for desktop.

Visualizing the Usage of Firefox’s Main Window

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Visualizing the Usage of Firefox’s Main Window
  • Sync 1.4 and the status bar
  • Meet Test Pilot in Firefox 4 Beta
  • Firefox Main Window Study: A Heatmap Visualization
  • Mozilla Firefox 4 Pre Beta 2

VMware and Novell: Merger Rumor or More?

Filed under
SUSE

thevarguy.com: The speculation won’t go away. Several companies apparently have bid to acquire Novell. Some pundits think VMware is among the bidders. Why’s that?

Firefox meets Pidgin = InstantBird

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: InstantBird is one of the more interesting applications I’ve tried in a while a while. It's a messaging client that is a curious hybrid of both Firefox & Pidgin.

Epiphany: An efficient, but different, web browser

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Software

ghacks.net: Replacing the web browser proved to be a challenge. And although it’s not able to stand alone as a full blown replacement for my favorite, Chrome, the Epiphany web browser is a nice, serviceable replacement that supports RGBA.

Graphics drivers

Filed under
Software

zrusin.blogspot: There are only two tasks harder than writing Free Software graphics drivers. One is running a successful crocodile petting zoo, the other is wireless bungee jumping.

Moving Firefox Fourwards

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: I last interviewed Mozilla Europe's Tristan Nitot a couple of years ago. Yesterday, I met up with him again, and caught up with the latest goings-on in the world of Firefox.

Applications to make your KDE more powerful and smarter

Filed under
Software

reviewglitz.com: KDE is a nice desktop manager for linux operating systems. KDE usually comes with almost everything you might need. But have you ever dreamed if you could make your kde better, smarter and powerful with more amazing applications.

Kanotix makes comeback with version 2010

Filed under
Linux

lwn.net: Kanotix is a Debian-based Linux distribution aimed at new users or anyone wishing for an easy-to-use system. In 2005 Kanotix was looking good, it was stable, fast, and had some handy extras. But then it suddenly disappeared. Now it's back.

5 Little Linux Computers

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: This month we take a look at a number of small form factor PCs that either come with Linux or would make a perfect fit for your favorite Linux distro. Each of the computers mentioned takes up very little space, but all deliver plenty of computing performance to handle everything from basic web browsing to watching videos.

Dell reiterates that Linux is safer than Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: It seems however they have not retracted similar statements from the "Linux 101" video on the same Ubuntu page. In the video, a speaker mentions the following comments about Ubuntu:

Debian Opens "Front Desk" for Derivatives

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Many Linux projects use Debian Linux as their code base for developing their distributions. One of the reasons derivative projects don't give back is how difficult and time consuming the process can be. Many just don't know what to do. So Debian has created a contact point to facilitate the practice.

Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat Alpha 2 - What's New And Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are no changes to the Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat artwork: no new Light Themes version, wallpaper, no new icons or anything like that - those usually come very late in the development cycle. But there are still some changes since Alpha 1 in Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat and Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 worth mentioning.

Read on!

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More in Tux Machines

Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal
    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.
  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux
    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.
  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms
    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on. Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.
  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively
    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’. The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS. The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes
    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes. If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!
  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland
    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor. Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.
  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD
    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release. In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis
    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.
  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora
    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May. The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem. Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.