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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:40pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:39pm
Story Linux 4.2 Inching Closer To Landing In Ubuntu 15.10 Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:38pm
Story LibreOffice community achievements Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:34pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:32pm
Story LinuxCon Preview: Q&A with SUSE’s Michael Miller Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:28pm
Story Hardkernel tweaks its popular Odroid-C1 Pi clone Rianne Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:25pm
Story The State of Fedora: 2015 Edition Roy Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 7:00pm
Story Sweden’s Halland region extends KOHA library system Roy Schestowitz 12/08/2015 - 6:52pm
Story Oracle's Lunacy Roy Schestowitz 1 12/08/2015 - 6:44pm

Banshee sheds HAL

Filed under
Software

lamalex.net: Yesterday it finally landed. Gabriel Burt, one of Banshee’s maintainers, merged in the GIO/udev hardware backend that Alan McGovern and I have been working on. This is awesome for everyone. Here’s why it’s awesome for you.

Does Intel Buying McAfee Have Any Impact On Open Source

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: The big news in tech today is of course Intel buying McAfee, in a deal valued at about 7.7 billion dollars. I think this deal is all about mobile devices and mobile computing security. I think Intel has made a huge misstep here and the reason maybe they don't understand open source software.

Ubuntu One – The KDE Way

Filed under
Software

apachelog.wordpress: Over the past couple of months I had the great opportunity of taking part in this year’s Google Summer of Code. I moved out to bring Ubuntu One to the KDE desktop and I think I was rather successful with it.

Spook developer speaks! An interview with Matthew Burton

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

opensource.com: I had a chance to talk with Matthew Burton, the former intelligence analyst turned open source cause celebre who just launched a tool that helps frame and understand arguments with imperfect evidence.

Performance vs Readability: the biggest dilemma

lxnay.wordpress: Let’s say you want to start a FLOSS project. How many people did that up to now? Many. But there is a problem, or better, a conflict of goals.

Lightweight Distro Roundup: Day 4 – Sabayon Five-Oh LXDE

Filed under
Linux

g33q.co.za: Today we give Sabayon Five-Oh a run. Three of the four distros we reviewed this week have been using LXDE as its desktop environment.

Oracle vs Google: Triple Damage

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle vs Google: Triple Damage!
  • Oracle loses another DTrace creator
  • The OpenSolaris-Based Nexenta Core Platform 3.0 Released

0 A.D. Releases Alpha Build, Launches PPA

Filed under
Gaming

workswithu.com: The dreams of Ubuntu users looking for commercial-quality games that run natively on Linux came a little closer to fulfillment this week, as the open-source project 0 A.D. pushed out its first alpha release.

Two Distributions Celebrate Birthdays

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: The Linux community had two birthdays to celebrate recently. Debian GNU/Linux turned 17 on August 16 and openSUSE has been providing an excellent desktop Linux for five years.

GNOME 2.32 Beta 1 Is Here

Filed under
Software

softpedia.com: The first beta of the upcoming GNOME 2.32 has landed to give early adopters, distro builders, developers and generally curious people a taste of things to come.

Are we being too hard on Adobe?

Filed under
Software

shanefagan.com: The perception is that every company can do what Google does and open source everything they can and even go as far as to buy other companies to open source their products.

Installing A Multiserver Setup With Dedicated Web, Email, DNS And MySQL Database Servers On Debian 5.0 With ISPConfig 3

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial describes the installation of an ISPConfig 3 multiserver setup with dedicated web, email, database and two DNS servers all managed trough a single ISPConfig 3 control panel. The setup described below uses five servers and can be extended easily to to a higher number of servers by just adding more servers. E.g. if you want to have two mailservers, do the setup steps from chapter 2 on both of these servers. If you want to set up more web servers, then install ISPConfig on all other web servers in expert mode except of the first one.

Fedora 14 Alpha is go

Filed under
Linux

paul.frields.org: As John posted last night, Fedora 14 Alpha was declared ready for release next week. Although there was a one-week slip to handle the fact that our blocker list wasn’t clear, Fedora developers and testers in the community have worked hard together both to resolve the remaining issues and make sure that our Alpha would pass the release criteria.

Arch Linux – Minimal, Lightweight, Flexible & Easy to Use

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Linux

pcsplace.com: Arch Linux is a lightweight, flexible and simple Linux Distribution which is targeted at competent GNU/Linux users. Its Development focuses on a balance of minimalism, elegance, code correctness and modernity. It provides a minimal environment upon installation, (no GUI), already compiled and optimized for i686/x86-64 architectures.

The KDE 4.5 Notification Area

Filed under
KDE

ghacks.net: With KDE 4.5 came a lot of updates and changes. From the bottom to the top, nothing was immune from an update or two. One tool that received a nice overhaul is the Notification Area.

Illumos begins diverging from OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: According to Garret D'Amore, Illumos project leader, the recently launched derivative is beginning to diverge from OpenSolaris.

Peppermint Ice review

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: Does Peppermint Ice, the new cloud-oriented desktop distro, have what it takes to do for desktops what Jolicloud and Google Chrome OS are doing for netbooks?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News
  • Emacs undo trees
  • Untangle Gateway- An open source solution for blocking
  • Be A Community Manager
  • Novell and Markus Rex: Reinventing An Empire
  • Open Source Contributor Agreements: Some Examples
  • Open source and Windows 8: spotlight on Microsoft’s open source interop strategy
  • Improve artwork openSUSE 11.4
  • ATI's 2D Performance With X.Org Server 1.9
  • Open-source cuts through intell community's red tape
  • European Open Source Think Tank 2010:
  • Reflective compiz panels
  • The popularity of Firefox around the world
  • SFLS: Episode 0x2D:Updated Discussion
  • Linux Outlaws 163 - The Frostbite Empire

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Sudo without Passwords
  • Backup your Linux machine the smart way
  • Mount Any Archive File In Two Clicks
  • Enable SSL on Apache-2.2
  • 2 Ways to Add Swap Space Using dd, mkswap and swapon
  • How to Create a Family Friendly Ubuntu Setup
  • Multiple IP address in Unbutu
  • How to free Linux Kernel page cache and/or inode and dentry caches
  • Install and configure MailWatch monitoring tool for MailScanner
  • nethogs - Net top tool grouping bandwidth per process
  • verify and compare two directories differences
  • How to Install KDE 4.5

OpenOffice by the book

Filed under
OOo

mybroadband.co.za: South African organisation Translate.org.za is best known for its work translating open source software into indigenous South African languages. Now, in addition to translating the software into additional languages, Translate.org.za has also released a book on using OpenOffice.org effectively.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

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