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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 16 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical Is Back To Doing Feature Development For Launchpad Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:19pm
Story 5 open source alternatives to Google Docs Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:15pm
Story More Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition Purchase Invites Are Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:11pm
Story The Next Big Thing in Open-Source May Be Housing Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:02pm
Story French robot company raising money for open source companion robot “BUDDY” Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 2:54pm
Story Endless: A computer the rest of the world can afford Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 2:44pm
Story Papyros Linux Distro Uses a New Material Design Shell Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 2:40pm
Story AMD Catalyst 15.7 Stable Linux Driver Released After a Long Absence Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 2:39pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 1:10pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 1:08pm

Is HP Rude To Gnu/Linux Users?

Filed under
Linux

muktware.com: HP has introduced its first all-in-one PC as part of the enterprise-class HP Compaq 6000 Pro family. It is unfortunate that HP doesn't offer Gnu/Linux on these machines.

Old school Linux tips

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

ghacks.net: Some times you just have to pull some tricks out of the vault. These tips can be timeless, classic, or just retro. But generally speaking they still apply to users today. Naturally, since these are mostly old school tips, they are going to be command line tips.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Helping others get Fedora
  • E3 Rage Footage
  • Ubuntu’s vmbuilder Script
  • HOWTO: Use Ubuntu Software Center in Mint 9
  • When Linux Isn't Called Linux
  • tch meego
  • GUI toolkit adds OpenGL support
  • Whoops, X.Org Server 1.9 Gets Another RC Today
  • D.C. launches test of open-source online voting, PR
  • eWeek's Fedora 13 Slideshow
  • ThinkGeek's Best Ever Cease and Desist
  • How to Hide Porn in Linux?
  • TinyMe 2010 Acorn RC 1 Review
  • Binary wallpaper with hidden Fedora message
  • SFLS Episode 0x2A: Waiting for Bilski

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create a Mail Icon with the GIMP
  • Keep your passwords safe in Linux with KeePassX
  • How to access / mount Windows shares from Linux
  • Tweak Photo Metadata with FotoTagger
  • C++ Pretty Functions
  • How to Find the Most Memory taking process in Ubuntu Linux
  • Increase download speed with Aria2 utility
  • FTP and SFTP Beginners Guide with 10 Examples
  • Install the Banshee Meego Interfact in Ubuntu

Get off your Windows high horse: Try something new

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com/blog: The vast majority of students use Windows, with a small selection using Mac’s and a very niche number using a Linux variant. But what good is it if you are going into a working environment and they don’t use the software you’ve always been used to?

2010 Readers' Choice Awards Survey

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: Linux Journal's Readers' Choice Awards offer the opportunity for readers to vote for their Linux and Open Source favorites.

Open Clip Art Library Launches Logo Design Contest

Filed under
OSS

blog.worldlabel.com: From now, until the submission deadline of 11:59p on July 9th, The Open Clip Art Library will be accepting user-created and remixed entries, as a part of the Free Culture Research Conference Logo Design Contest.

WordPress Social Media Optimization in a Nutshell

Filed under
Software

Wordpress is a great platform for SEO — in fact, most of the title and meta optimization is done for you right out of the box. However, that is not the case of social media. Here is a brief list of ways you can use Wordpress to improve the social media optimization of your blog or content site.

Why did I choose to use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

computer-supports.com: Currently I prefer to use Ubuntu, after I felt the ability to provide Ubuntu Graphical on my laptop, especially Ubuntu 10.04. There are a few that made me feel at home using and choosing Ubuntu Linux operating system, which are as follows:

Marten Mickos says open source doesn't have to be fully open

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: The term "open core" essentially means that the heart of a software project is built on, and remains, open source but added features may not be (particularly a commercial version intended for enterprise use).VC-funded software startups love this model.

User Space File Systems

linux-mag.com: Having file systems in the kernel has its pros and cons. Being able to write file systems in user-space also has some pros and cons, but FUSE (File System in Userspace) allows you to create some pretty amazing results.

openSUSE Linux seeks own direction, more autonomy from Novell

Filed under
SUSE

arstechnica.com: The developers behind openSUSE are drafting a new "community statement" as part of a broader effort to define a technical strategy for their project. The purpose of the community statement is to describe the kind of collaborative environment that the project wants to create as it refines its technical focus.

Firefox 3.6.4 with Crash Protection Now Available

Filed under
Moz/FF

developer.mozilla.org: Today, Mozilla is happy to release Firefox 3.6.4, the latest security and stability release for Firefox, used by nearly 400 million people around the world to browse the Web. This release provides crash protection for Windows and Linux users by isolating third-party plugins when they crash.

Xnoise: A New Lightweight Linux Music Player (Can Play Videos Too!)

Filed under
Software

webupd8.org: Xnoise is basically an music player but it can also play videos too and unlike other Linux music players, it uses a tracklist centric design:

50 Open Source Tools That Replace Popular Education Apps

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: The educational community has discovered open source tools in a big way. Analysts predict that schools will spend up to $489.9 million on support and services for open source software by 2012, and that only includes charges related to operating systems and learning management systems.

Mozilla, Opera, and Flock Release VP8 Ready Browsers

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

linuxjournal.com: The latest wares of three popular browsing applications were released this week reflecting a changing Internet. Open formats are taking center stage at Mozilla, Opera, and Flock as lock-in (or freeze-out), security concerns, and performance issues fuel the drive toward the VP8 video format.

Fedora 14 design proposals

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora design team is looking for submissions for the 'release theme' for Fedora 14 - essentially the desktop background and related images that derive from it - and feedback on existing submissions, which you can find on the wiki page. You can send your feedback to the design mailing list. Martin Sourada has a blog post up, as does Luya Tshimbalanga. Here's your chance to get involved and make sure Fedora 14 looks sharp!

Mandriva Saved By New Investors

Filed under
MDV

broadcast.oreilly.com: After weeks of concern about the "catastrophic state of it's finances" and an indefiniete delay in the release of version 2010.1, the French website LeMagIT is reporting that Mandriva has been saved by new investors.

Red Hat Summit and JBoss World kicks off

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat Summit and JBoss World kicks off
  • Summit 2010, here I come.
  • Red Hat CEO: Cloud Can’t Exist Without Open Source
  • Small Business: How Red Hat Will Attack Microsoft Stronghold
  • Amdocs Selects Red Hat
  • Red Hat Named to Bloomberg BusinessWeek 50
  • Red Hat Hires Novell Veteran for Virtualization Push
  • Red Hat Focuses on Partnerships With Q1 Earnings Ahead

Open Season : Maverick

Filed under
Ubuntu

design.canonical.com: It’s back and it’s bigger than ever! It’s that time of the year again, time to start hunting down those nasty trivial Papercut bugs.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI
    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker. Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.
  • Musings on bug trackers
    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.
  • ABI stability for GXml
    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml. GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

  • Barcelona Aims To Oust Microsoft In Open Source Drive
    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft software for open source software
    Barcelona, one of the most popular cities in the Europe is now switching to open-source software by replacing Microsoft Windows, Office and Exchange with Linux, Libre Office and Open Xchange respectively. The city council is already piloting the use of Ubuntu Linux desktops along with Mozilla Firefox as the default browser. With this move, Barcelona city is planning to save money over the years by reducing software/service licensing fees. They are also planning to hire new developers to write open-source software. The open-source product will also be made available to other Spanish municipalities and public bodies further afield allowing them the opportunity to save money on software licences.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft in favour of open source Linux software
    Catalan capital Barcelona is planning to ditch proprietary software products from Microsoft in favour of free, open source alternatives such as Open-Xchange email. That’s according to a report by Spain's national paper El Pais, which reports that Barcelona plans to invest 70% of its annual software budget in open source this year.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source turns 20
    While open source software is ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental infrastructure component as well as a critical factor for driving innovation, the "open source" label was coined only 20 years ago. The concept of open source software - as opposed to free software or freeware - is credited to Netscape which, in January 1998, announced plans to release the source code of its proprietary browser, Navigator, under a license that would freely permit modification and redistribution. This code is today the basis for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) regards that event as the point at which "software freedom extended its reach beyond the enthusiast community and began its ascent into the mainstream".
  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
    Coreboot 4.7 is now available as the latest release of this free and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement. Coreboot 4.7 is the latest tagged release for this project developed via Git. This release has initial support for AMD Stoney Ridge platforms, Intel ICH10 Southbridge support, Intel Denverton/Denverton-NS platform support, and initial work on supporting next-gen Intel Cannonlake platforms.
  • Thank you CUSEC!
    Last week, I spoke at CUSEC (Canadian Undergraduate Software Engineering Conference) in Montreal.   I really enjoy speaking with students and learning what they are working on.  They are the future of our industry!  I was so impressed by the level of organization and the kindness and thoughtfulness of the CUSEC organizing committee who were all students from various universities across Canada. I hope that you all are enjoying some much needed rest after your tremendous work in the months approaching the conference and last week.
  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • The Universal Donor
    A few people reacted negatively to my article on why Public Domain software is broadly unsuitable for inclusion in a community open source project. Most argued that because public domain gave them the rights they need where they live (mostly the USA), I should not say it was wrong to use it. That demonstrates either parochialism or a misunderstanding of what public domain really means. It should not be used for the same reason code known to be subject to software patents should not be used — namely that only code that, to the best efforts possible, can be used by anyone, anywhere without the need to ask permission (e.g. by buying a patent license) or check it it’s needed (e.g. is that PD code PD here?) can be used in an open source project. Public domain fails the test for multiple reasons: global differences in copyright term, copyright as an unalienable moral rather than as a property right, and more. Yes, public domain may give you the rights you need. But in an open source project, it’s not enough for you to determine you personally have the rights you need. In order to function, every user and contributor of the project needs prior confidence they can use, improve and share the code, regardless of their location or the use to which they put it. That confidence also has to extend to their colleagues, customers and community as well.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04, Lubuntu 17.04 EoL

  • Ubuntu Core: A secure open source OS for IoT
    Canonical's Ubuntu Core, a tiny, transactional version of the Ubuntu Linux OS for IoT devices, runs highly secure Linux application packages, known as "snaps," that can be upgraded remotely.
  • Introducing the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04
    Ubuntu’s changed a lot in the last year, and everything is leading up to a really exciting event: the release of 18.04 LTS! This next version of Ubuntu will once again offer a stable foundation for countless humans who use computers for work, play, art, relaxation, and creation. Among the various visual refreshes of Ubuntu, it’s also time to go to the community and ask for the best wallpapers. And it’s also time to look for a new video and music file that will be waiting for Ubuntu users on the install media’s Examples folder, to reassure them that their video and sound drivers are quite operational. Long-term support releases like Ubuntu 18.04 LTS are very important, because they are downloaded and installed ten times more often than every single interim release combined. That means that the wallpapers, video, and music that are shipped will be seen ten times more than in other releases. So artists, select your best works. Ubuntu enthusiasts, spread the word about the contest as far and wide as you can. Everyone can help make this next LTS version of Ubuntu an amazing success.
  • Lubuntu 17.04 has reached End of Life
    The Lubuntu Team announces that as a non-LTS release, 17.04 has a 9-month support cycle and, as such, reached end of life on Saturday, January 13, 2018. Lubuntu will no longer provide bug fixes or security updates for 17.04, and we strongly recommend that you update to 17.10, which continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes.