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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why I am still supporting Free Software?

Filed under
OSS

handypenguin.blogspot: Today I was debating with a friend the relevance of Free Software, he pointed that at the current development rate is very unlikely that Linux (most common Free Software subject) will have a significant end users market share in 50 years.

Meet the SmartBook: Tablet, netbook, MID and more in one.

Filed under
Hardware

omgubuntu.co.uk: Always Innovating’s new Smart Book device is so much of everything that’s it’s almost hard to describe.

A holiday miracle, thanks to PhotoRec

Filed under
Software

openattitude.com: Yesterday I sat down at my Linux computer to transfer some rather special New Year’s Eve photos from my new camera. I can’t say for sure exactly what happened,

Free Software: the road to a Universal bundle, a powerful app store, and world domination

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OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Apple is doing it again: they are releasing an app store for OS X on the 6th of January. Just like the iPhone app store, and the Android app store, this is going to be a hit: the OS X ecosystem will get a giant boost from it, and we are left — once again — with a lot to learn.

The differences between Linux IO Schedulers

Filed under
Linux

blog.mypapit.net: The Linux kernel input/output scheduler (IO Schedulers) controls the way the kernel handles read/write to disks. Different I/O schedulers may have different impact on certain workloads. Here are the list of available Linux I/O schedulers:

Linux Mint vs

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Mint vs Pinguy OS Review
  • Mint vs. LMDE: Sudden weight gain

Evangelistic Linux

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com: Step right up! Step right up! Come one, come all. I am reverend Locutus and the Linux train is about to take off. If you are not on board then you will be left behind in the boon docks. For those of you who are still with us then welcome to the LINUX SAVES show.

openSUSE finished 2010 big

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: October, the openSUSE community has been extremely active. New projects announced there have had progress, others have emerged.

Linux and open source prognostications for 2011

Filed under
Linux
OSS

blogs.techrepublic.com: Happy new year to everyone! It’s that time again, when every media-type with a keyboard and a sense they “know” what’s coming ’round the bend starts making their predictions for the upcoming year.

Is Netflix a Friend or Foe to FOSS?

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: Well it's 2011 at last, and those of us here in the FOSS community have a great deal to look forward to this year. But what about Netflix?

Sandy Bridge is the biggest disapointment of the year

Filed under
Hardware

semiaccurate.com: If you try to use Sandy Bridge under Linux, it is simply broken. We tried to test an Intel DH67BL (Bearup Lake) with 2GB of Kingston HyperX DDR3, an Intel 32GB SLC SSD, and a ThermalTake Toughpower 550W PSU.

Ubuntu and the price of Unity

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu and the price of Unity
  • Ubuntu’s fundamental flaw: Frozen full-screen apps
  • Bacon: Thinking About Ubuntu And 2011

today's howtos & stuff:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Ubuntu 10.10: Change grub menu timeout
  • KStars with experimental OpenGL support in RC2
  • How to install Linux Mint Debian Edition on an encrypted LVM
  • Fedora 14 - How to make Samsung Fn Brightness buttons work
  • How to upgrade Salix from 13 to 13.1
  • LibreOffice Ubuntu PPA makes installation easy
  • How to find out the various manpage sections to which a command belongs
  • Tar Tricks on Linux
  • Report on the Tel Aviv Perl Mongers Meeting
  • VLC Shares: Watch HD Videos from Your Wii and Android Phone
  • Using Case in Variables in Bash Shell Scripts
  • Use dpkg to find what's created at install
  • Falling Snow/Leaves/Objects on Ubuntu Background
  • Grep This!
  • Install Gnome Color Chooser On Ubuntu
  • How to clear or drop the cache buffer pages from Linux memory
  • How to Import KeePassX Password to LastPass (And Vice-versa)
  • Multiple Concurrent Linux Distributions
  • Pardus Linux 2011 RC Overview/Review (Video)

Xfce 4.8pre3 Released

Filed under
Software

xfce.org: Today we are pleased to announce the third and hopefully final preview release of Xfce 4.8 which is set to be pushed out to the public on January 16th, 2011. Compared to Xfce 4.8pre2 this release mostly features translation updates and bug fixes.

Happy New Debian GNU/Linux Release

Filed under
Linux

pogson.6k.ca: Squeeze is not officially released yet but the bug-count is in the same ball-park as the last release, Lenny, and the bugs I have examined are pretty narrow.

Linux Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

markd60.blogspot: I am seriously thinking of making the switch from Windows to one of the Linux Operating Systems. The two most popular Linux systems are Fedora, and Ubuntu. I chose Ubuntu because one review I read said it is slightly more user friendly.

MeeGo-Harmattan Is Handling FreeDesktop.org X

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: While Intel is looking to use Wayland on MeeGo Touch for their mobile/embedded purposes, the Nokia side is still focusing upon X for the time being. But rather than using X, they are working towards using the mainline X.Org Server as found on FreeDesktop.org.

LMDE 201101 32-bit re-spin

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxmint.com: As re-spin of the LMDE 201012 32-bit ISO was made available under the name “201101″. The new ISO comes with an up-to-date live kernel which addresses the following issues:

New openSUSE Build Service Interface

Filed under
SUSE

anditosan.blogspot: I have been reviewing some of the interaction that one is to use when working with openSUSE's Build Service system. I have noted that the interface could be changed a little in order to reflect a more active form of interacting with one's package information.

Save The GIMP!

Filed under
GIMP

cristalinux.blogspot: I recently learned that the fabulous GNU Image Manipulation Program is developed and maintained but only three main hackers!!!...

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.