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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 30 Linux Kernel Developer Work Spaces in 30 Weeks: Jes Sorensen Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 3:49pm
Story Do-it-yourself corporate cloud with ownCloud 6 Enterprise Edition Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 3:44pm
Story making friends with kontact again Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 3:41pm
Story Applications 4.13 Coming Soon, Help Us Test! Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 3:37pm
Story Breaking Microsoft’s Chains by Moving to LibreOffice Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 3:27pm
Story Wil Wheaton ‘Not Crazy’ About Direction Ubuntu Is Taking Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 11:42am
Story Peppermint 4 – An OS for everyone? & The Probem of Linux Advocacy Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 11:13am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 9:40am
Story Wine, ChromeOS and Cross-Platform Computing in the Cloud Age Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 8:14am
Story Ubuntu 14.04 default and community wallpapers revealed Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2014 - 8:01am

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 4 Initial Impressions

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SUSE Even if I wasn't such an openSUSE devotee, I think I might find a lot of good things to say about this Linux product. Beta 4 is almost stable enough for production use.

Linux growth: The Asus connection

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Linux Asustek is not a name most people know. The Taiwan-based hardware maker traditionally operates in the PC-board sector. But a few years ago the company began to make its own notebook PCs.

Puppy Linux - Absolutely stunning!

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Linux Puppy Linux is an amazing distro. If you're thinking this tiny, 93MB distro is going to leave you with a spartan, minimalistic desktop experience, think again.

Why do old bugs still exist?

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Software It's really begun to baffle me why certain bugs within the FOSS world haven't been fixed yet, or have taken so long to be fixed. A couple that come to mind come from recent experiences I've had either directly, or indirectly with these bugs.

How Linux Helped Chickens, Environmentalists, and a Pirate

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Linux I’ve worked with a Japanese company called Plat’Home, maker of small, tough, eco-friendly servers, for the past nine months or so. They ran a contest this summer about ideas. They called it the “Will Linux Work? Contest.” They collected ideas from Linux lovers on how they would use Linux in interesting and sometimes challenging ways.

Hell freezes over: Ballmer considering open-source browser

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OSS I fully expected to die never having heard a positive word escape Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's lips with regard to open source. Based on Ballmer's comments made in Sydney on Friday, however, it may be time for me to start picking out my funeral arrangements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • Why Microsoft fears Linux

  • What Outsourcers Can Learn from Open-Source Communities
  • Fedora 10 preview release shines like a star
  • Is Sun taking open source a little too far?
  • Open Sources Episode 2: This time we pay attention
  • Follow The Netbook Road
  • Netbook conundrum -- Windows or Linux?
  • Sun still radiating open source
  • Fork you very much: Gist brings revision tracking to pastes
  • Road-Tripping With Linux
  • DRM firmware adopted by mobile Linux stack
  • OIN: Making the world 'safe for Linux'
  • New critical vulnerabilities in VLC media player
  • Debian Linux
  • Decided to stay on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Mandriva Testcases
  • The Case for a New Open Source License
  • Dell Inspiron Mini 9 battery consumption test
  • Kiss Firefox EULA goodbye
  • At ApacheCon, Microsoft jumps on open source bandwagon

10 Cool Linux Apps You Maybe Didn’t Know About

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Software Ubuntu comes pre-installed with a wealth of apps - covering almost every task you need to do, while still managing to fit on a CD. Are you ready to discover some pretty cool apps that don’t get the attention they deserve? Let’s check them out.

GNU/Linux is user-friendly - and logical too

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Linux Over at iTWire, we are often in the position where we disagree with a fellow writer and say so. This morning, I found my colleague Davey Winder's piece "Opinion: why Linux sucks at being user friendly" to be a litle too general to pass without comment.

some howtos & such:

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  • Comparison of Python virtual machines

  • What to do if every kernel update break your bootloader settings
  • auto-apt : on-demand package installer
  • 3 More Things Every Good Linux Adminstrator Knows
  • Automatically mount encrypted filesystems at login with pam_mount
  • Tables in Impress: New and Unstylish
  • Why Firefox Rocks on Linux: Great Firefox Tricks, Part III
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux
  • More Quick Ways To Find CPU Bottlenecks On Linux

Amarok Insider - Issue 13 Released

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Software Issue 13 of Amarok Insider, the official Amarok newsletter is out. It discusses the evolution of Amarok's interface, reveals the release plans, covers some of the biggest features of the upcoming version 2.0, and much more. Download links for Windows and OS X versions of the Amarok 2.0 beta are included.

Fluxbox - Why You Might Want to Try It

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Fluxbox When you think about desktop environments on Linux/Unix, you’ll probably think GNOME and KDE. Rather than using an integrated suite of programs, you can simply use a standalone window manager and then just run any of the apps you want. Fluxbox is such a window manager.

Wi-Fi Linux network bug found, fixed

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blogs.computerworld: These days, most of us can use our Wi-Fi cards on Linux using native drivers. Some of us, though, are still stuck with using Windows drivers on Linux. This kludge is usually done by using the Windows driver with NDISwrapper. Unfortunately, it's recently been discovered that there's a crack in the kludge.

IBM Lotus Adds Mac OS X, Ubuntu Linux Support To Symphony Apps

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Software Expanding its efforts to offer an alternative to Microsoft's Office desktop applications, IBM is making its free Lotus Symphony office productivity suite available for Apple's Mac OS X and Canonical's Ubuntu Linux.

Creative Gives In, They Open-Source Their X-Fi Driver

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OSS The Sound Blaster X-Fi sound card driver for Linux from Creative Labs was awful. That's simply the nicest way to put it. However, Creative Labs today has finally turned this situation around and they have open-sourced the code to this notorious driver.

Collabora funds development of open source video editor PiTiVi

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Software Open source multimedia specialist Collabora is hiring developers to work on the nonlinear video editor PiTiVi. The Cambridge, UK-based company contributes heavily to the GStreamer media framework and other GStreamer-dependent projects, so PiTiVi is a natural fit -- and it fills a sorely needed niche on the Linux desktop.

openSUSE 11.1 countdown

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dev-loki.blogspot: The openSUSE release countdown banners have been updated, with new languages (pt_BR, hu, id, bg, jp and wa) as well as counting down to 11.1. And as it is rendered on the server, it always points to the right number of remaining days before 11.1 release.

More Work On Red Hat's Wayland Project

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Software Since publishing the world's first look at Wayland, a nano display server for Linux with an integrated compositing manager, there has been much interest in this emerging Red Hat project. While this project is still in its infancy, below are a few more notes about recent changes with Wayland.

Will Linux ever be a mainstream desktop play?

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Linux I strongly suspect that there are inherent tradeoffs between the flexibility and choice associated with open source and the unified approach (epitomized by Apple) that tends to be associated with good user interface design. But the bigger issue with mainstreaming the Linux PC has nothing to do with design and everything with where we are in technology history.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.