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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samsung Tizen based Gear Blink (Glass) to launch in March 2015? Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:00pm
Story FoundationDB Adds Open Source SQL Storage Tool Rianne Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 6:38pm
Story Red Hat Satellite 6 is now available Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 5:41pm
Story Akademy Tuesday Wrapup Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 5:22pm
Story PwC-led team to offer 'open source' EHR to DoD Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 10:57am
Story Why open source is positive for healthcare Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 10:51am
Story NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 10:46am
Story Deb Nicholson receives O’Reilly Open Source Award Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 10:08am
Story Top Linux Myths Dispelled Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 9:47am
Forum topic Cisco 3750 Switch ASA VPN Routing Ayaerlee 10/09/2014 - 6:55am

More powerful Python testing techniques

Filed under
Linux

Python testing reporting features that let testing support more and more powerful techniques

Studio Dave Tests Ubuntu Studio 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: I need at least one i386 installation here at Studio Dave because some production software is not yet 64-bit ready, and I happen to need that software. Thus began my most recent series of trials and tribulations with Ubuntu.

Happy Birthday, Mozilla - and Thanks for Being Here

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Seven years ago, Mozilla 1.0 was launched. The Mozilla project was originally a browser *suite*, which included an email reader and a chat client as well as a browser.

Chrome on Linux: Rough, fast & promising

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I'd been waiting for Chrome on Linux since Chrome first showed up. Chrome, if you haven't tried it, is the speed-demon of Web browsers. I love it. But, until now, there really wasn't a version that would run natively on Linux.

GIMP Animation Package 2.6.0 Released

Filed under
GIMP

GAP 2.6.0 is a stable release of the video menu intended for use with the GIMP 2.6.x series. This release contains updates for video encoding/decoding, undo support for the storyboard feature and fixes for better compatibility with the GIMP 2.6.x releases.

Firefox 3.5: How Soon and How Big a Deal?

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews.com: Firefox 3.0 is not quite a year old, but users are already clamoring for Firefox 3.5. So where is it, and what is it all about?

Resellers to trial Red Hat Enterprise Linux V5.3

Filed under
Linux

crn.com.au: HP has partnered with Red Hat to develop a solution for RISC Migration projects. The solution offers Red Hat Enterprise Linux running on HP BladeSystems.

Novell - On the way to becoming a Linux business?

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: Novell's recently released figures for the second quarter of 2009 showed an 8.5 per cent drop in sales compared to the previous year – not a big surprise in light of the much debated economic crisis. However, one area of the business has enjoyed constant, indeed double-digit, growth over the last few years – Linux.

GNU Linux - Pros & Cons

Filed under
Linux

gauravlive.com: As with all things, GNU Linux too has pros & cons. Here I will try to give you a rough idea of both the sides of GNU Linux, so you can decide whether to take the plunge.

Winning the war won't secure peace for open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.co.uk: Open source may have won the argument, but that does not mean the world will now change, says Mark Taylor.

Miro - Internet TV

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Some of you may have heard of Miro before; it used to be known as the Democracy Player. For those who have not heard of Miro, it is a good-looking, versatile, modern multimedia application intended to open the taps of Internet media and stream music and videos onto users' desktops.

Google debuts Chrome for Mac, Linux

Filed under
Software

cnet.com: Google released Chrome for Mac OS X and Linux Thursday--but only in rough developer preview versions that the company warns are works in progress.

June 5, 2002: Browser, Philosophy Born of Turmoil, Defeat

Filed under
Moz/FF

wired.com: 2002: Mozilla 1.0 is released. The first major milestone for the open source browser doesn’t do much to impress users or shake loose Microsoft’s crown. However, it proves to the world that free software can succeed not just in the server room, but also on the desktop.

25 Sites about Fedora You Can’t Miss

Filed under
Linux
Web

2indya.com: Fedora is an open-source community developed operating system and there are many sites that provide help and support and other solutions for using it. Here is a compilation of 25.

Slackware and Zenwalk

Filed under
Linux

linux-blog.org: I’ve been distro shopping lately. I had become complacent while working with PCLinuxOS because everything just works when using it. After some initial toolings in Arch and Gentoo, I settled on Slackware…

Happy 5th Birthday, Phoronix!

Filed under
Web

phoronix.com: It was five years ago today, on the 5th of June 2004, that Phoronix.com launched. It was also one year ago to the day that Phoronix Test Suite 1.0 was released. Here are a few statistics and highlights from the past five years.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Apt URL Part Two

  • The Bourne Shell War On Terror
  • Fedora casts Mono into outer darkness
  • SEO Tools For Linux
  • Recovering from Linux freezes
  • Increased competition 'uncomfortable' for Firefox
  • Getting Started with Firewall Builder
  • Moving from Solaris to Linux
  • Install a large number of packages with aptitude
  • Howto Make Applications Start in Specified Workspace
  • Sony Ericsson Using Drupal
  • Share Folders Between a Linux Host and Linux Virtual Machine on VirtualBox
  • Of Open Standards, Interoperability and Open Source
  • My Open Source 'Leech' Is Your Open Source User
  • The irony of free-software advocacy
  • Far Cry 2 Linux Server
  • How to Get a Quake-style Drop-down Terminal in Linux
  • X Input 2.0 Merged Into The X Server
  • Open source clicking the channels
  • Mondo & Mindi - Disaster recovery solution
  • Searching PDF Files With grep
  • Atlassian's Summit, and its Freebies for Open Source Developers
  • This Week on Github: In Good Company
  • EasyTAG
  • Kundra advocates open source
  • Linux Outlaws 95 - All Those Sheep Got PDAs

Don't Get Me Wrong, Linux Sucks as Much as Windows

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com/blog: here is the latest hot trend in anti-Linux baloney: supposed Linux fans and advocates who really really love Linux and have been using it for years, but can't recommend it for anyone else because "It's not ready."

Intel buys Wind River to push Linux

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: Intel's acquisition of Wind River on Thursday is a strong push by the chip maker to extend Linux support across devices that use its processors, analysts said.

Review: Acer Aspire One D150

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Review: Acer Aspire One D150

  • Moblin 2.0 - A New Way to Make a Netbook Sing With Linux
  • Future of netbooks, laptops unfolds at Computex
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more