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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Italy: High Court shoots down Windows tax Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 6:18am
Story Make Downloading Files Effortless Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 6:13am
Story KDevelop 4.7.0 Released Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 6:07am
Story Building Linux Distributions That Aren't Boring [VIDEO] Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:49am
Story Linux containers startup Flockport launches first of its kind LXC sharing website Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:46am
Story Apple Watch Follows in Android's Footsteps Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:34am
Story Firefox Add-on Enables Web Development Across Browsers and Devices Roy Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:31am
Story How to Build a Linux Media Server Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:12am
Story BattBorg: power your Raspberry Pi with almost any kind of battery Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 7:05am
Story Cortex-A5 SBC offers mainline Linux support Rianne Schestowitz 13/09/2014 - 6:59am

Five Essential Apps for the Ubuntu User

Filed under
Software

geeks.com: There's a lot of software for Ubuntu. A lot of it's good, some of it's OK, and there are a few duds. But the five applications that this TechTip covers are great additions to anyone's installation of Ubuntu.

5 Biggest Tech Letdowns

Filed under
Linux

connectedinternet.co.uk: It’s fun to look back in retrospect and remember the genesis of technologies that truly have become inseparable from our everyday lives. It’s even more fun to look back on the belly flops.

Macpup - Puppy on steroids

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Going through the almost endless repository of Puplets, I came across a little doggie called Macpup Foxy. It intrigued me, so I downloaded it and tried it - and very much liked it. So today, we're going to have a short review; nothing major. Call this a Puppy sequel, if you will.

Testing Out ATI Kernel Mode-Setting On Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Kernel mode-setting for Intel graphics hardware can already be found in the mainline Linux kernel and will be included by default in the release of Ubuntu 9.10 later this year.

Fedora 11 and Ext4: The Straight Bits

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

jaboutboul.blogspot: Fedora 11, when released tomorrow, will be the first distribution to boast the inclusion of ext4, the latest incarnation in the extended file system family, as default. Join me for an interview with Eric Sandeen, renown file system hacker.

Palm's Linux smartphone debuts

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: As promised, Palm's Linux-based smartphone went on sale Saturday, available exclusively for Sprint networks, says eWEEK. Early reviews have been favorable, although analysts worry about the lack of software and the ability of Sprint to effectively market the Palm Pre.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 306

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Absolute Linux 12.2.5

  • News: Fedora prepares to launch "Leonidas", openSUSE opens up development, Mandriva gathers ideas for 2010, CentOS publishes community magazine, Sun offers hints about Solaris 11, SliTaz 3.0 roadmap
  • Released last week: OpenSolaris 2009.06, Tiny Core Linux 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 11, Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 2
  • New additions: Hymera Open, Qimo 4 Kids
  • New distributions: Digital Forensic Live CD, InfraLinux, StormOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Thank Apple for the Linux 'desktop'

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Matt Asay: I spent the weekend using Ubuntu 9.04 almost exclusively. Blame it on Apple. In 2002 I switched to the Mac and have never looked back. Which, I think, is why it has been so easy to pick up Ubuntu, Moblin, and other variants of Linux.

Introducing Gloss

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Taking a short break from his coding academy, Hudzilla has spent the last few weeks touring Italy and - believe it or not - fiddling around with Python. The first fruits of his effort are now available for world + dog to try, so if you're looking for something new to hack on, continue reading to hear from the man himself...

Wolvix Linux 2.0 Beta 2 Review

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: This week I decided to take a look at a lesser known distribution called Wolvix Linux. Wolvix is based on Slackware and, according to the Wolvix site, is geared toward the home user. But how well does it really work for home users?

6 best orthodox file managers for Linux

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: Depending on when you got started with computers, you've probably used an orthodox file manager. Go back to basics with these old-school file managers.

China's Censorware: What about GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

opendotdotdot.blogspot: News is breaking that the Chinese government will insist on censorware being shipped with all PCs:

ubuntu 9.04 review

Filed under
Ubuntu

sathyaphoenix.wordpress: Ever since jaunty released, I had cleared made up my mind not to try it out. I thought 6 months was too little time to spend with intrepid. But yesterday night, I installed jaunty.

Test-driving Chrome for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: With an alpha version of Google’s Chrome web browser recently released, I’ve been using it on Ubuntu for a few days. Below are some thoughts on the new browser and its ability to improve the Ubuntu experience.

Why Windows is not yet ready for the Desktop

Filed under
Microsoft

climbing-the-hill.blogspot: I don't spend my time telling other people which OS should or shouldn't suit their way of working. But it seems there are people who do. And it is thus that I find myself moved enough to mock their contribution to the state of public discourse.

Squeezing Lenny didn't make a lemon.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: As you probably realised from my previous posts I like to put my Linux installations through their paces. In fact I am positively brutal with them. So I decided to do a distribution upgrade from Lenny.

No penguins in Akihibara

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Today in Tokyo, I set myself the task of finding Linux in the Akihibara, which advertises itself to the world as Tokyo’s electronic wonderland.

few odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Open Source Network Diagramming..

  • Linux Market Share Passes 2%
  • The Linux Action Show! Season 10 Episode 6
  • Doing the geek thing with Linux
  • Podcast 56 Gentoo Developer Joshua Jackson

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing 64bit Flash Player in Ubuntu Linux

  • Reclaim Linux Disk Space by Reducing Reserved Blocks
  • How to build a highly available file server using OpenSolaris
  • Subclassing a list in Python
  • NetBackup Backup Report Script

OpenSolaris 2009.06: Getting Better All The Time

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: The June 2009 (2009.06) release of OpenSolaris provides a solid Open Source GNOME desktop experience like that of a modern Linux distribution combined with the scalability and stability of UNIX.

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Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.