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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 25 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Examining the KNIME open source data analytics platform Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 6:58pm
Story Linksys Endorses OpenWrt Linux-Based Open Source OS in Latest Router Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 6:40pm
Story Oneplus One with Ubuntu Touch Just Got Cellular Support Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 6:33pm
Story Ubuntu Devs Don't Want Android Compatibility Layer for the OS Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 6:31pm
Story MyPaint Fills a Graphics Void on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 6:19pm
Story Lastpass sold to LogMeIn -- should Linux users panic? Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 6:13pm
Story Here are the phones and tablets that will get Android 6.0 Marshmallow Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 5:50pm
Story Enlightenment, KDE, and GNOME Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 11:32am
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 11:23am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 11:06am

5 Awesome Free Tools For Small Businesses

pcworld.com: These are frugal times for business, and an organization starting out might have very little money to spend on IT. Even if you're part of an established business, you're probably feeling the pinch. Here are five extremely useful computing resources that are free of charge for small business users.

RHEL 6: serious Linux built for growth

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Red Hat has released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, the first major update for RHEL in over three years.

Raaaaaaawwwhide! (rolling rolling rolling)

Filed under
Linux

happyassassin.net: A couple of days back I decided a week was plenty long enough to be running a boring, stable OS like Fedora 14 on my desktop and decided to upgrade it to Rawhide instead.

8 Alternative PDF Readers For Your Consideration

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Linux users, regardless which distro you are using, it bound to come with a default PDF reader that you can use to read PDF files. If you are yearning for a better (or faster) PDF reader, here are several options for you.

KDEPIM 4.5 is Dead -- Here's to KDEPIM 4.6

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: So... we have decided that there is no point to putting any more effort into the long-awaited KDEPIM 4.5.

Debian 5

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: I’ve written a lot of reviews of distros based on Debian, but never a review of Debian itself. So this time around I decided to look at Debian 5 (Lenny).

Adventures in Kubuntu: Throwing in the towel

Filed under
Ubuntu

dwasifar.com: Regular visitors have already read about my ongoing experiment with Kubuntu. To recap, I’m a little worried about where Gnome is going, and want to be ready to switch desktop environments if need be. So I installed kubuntu-desktop over an existing Ubuntu.

It was 20 years ago today

Filed under
Web
  • Web celebrates one of its 20th birthdays
  • 20 Years Ago, The Web’s Founders Ask for Funding

Quick look at Scientific Linux 6.0 Alpha

Filed under
Linux

all-things-linux.blogspot: I was meaning to write this yesterday and before you know, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0 final is out. But that doesn't mean we can't post a quick look at this one.

MariaDB 5.2 now faster and with alternative authentication

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: Launched by MySQL creator Michael "Monty" Widenius, the MariaDB MySQL fork has been released for downloading as version 5.2. The open source database is based on MySQL 5.1.51, although MariaDB contains additional functions.

Red Hat’s Secret Patent Deal

Filed under
Linux
Legal

gigaom.com: When patent troll Acacia sued Red Hat in 2007, it ended with a bang: Acacia’s patents were invalidated by the court, and all software developers, open-source or not, had one less legal risk to cope with. So, why is the outcome of Red Hat’s next tangle with Acacia being kept secret?

Did Ubuntu disrespect Fedora Linux with openrespect?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

internetnews.com: Openrespect.org is founded by Ubuntu Linux community manager Jono Bacon, as a way to encourage mutual respect across Linux distributions. Apparently though that mutual respect didn't fully extend to Red Hat's community Fedora Linux distribution.

Hexen: Edge of Chaos Demo

Filed under
Gaming

linuxgames.com: The Hexen: Edge of Chaos demo has been released for Doom 3 owners.

Fedora Plans For Wayland

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Wayland's not a usable default yet. It'll probably be packaged in F15 as something you can play with. We don't even have a complete list of transition criteria yet, let alone a timeframe.

Jolicloud's OS Isn't Just Similar to Chrome OS--Looks Like It Will Run With It

Filed under
OS

ostatic.com: Like Chrome OS, the Jolicloud OS is focused entirely on managing cloud-based applications as opposed to local ones (see the screenshot below). Its other similarity to Chrome OS is that it is squarely aimed at the netbook market.

UNR 10.10 Maverick Meerkat - Don't touch this!

Filed under
Ubuntu

dedoimedo.com: After being tremendously pleased with Maverick, as it ran superbly on both standard PC and even Mac, and loving the UNR 10.04 Lucid on my eeePC netbook, I figured Maverick Netbook Remix edition could only be a doubly double win for me. And so I tried it.

Keeping Red Hat in Raleigh a constant fight

Filed under
Linux
  • Keeping Red Hat in Raleigh a constant fight – Szulik
  • Red Hat tries the value argument for open source

Linux Mint 10 “Julia” released

Filed under
Linux

linuxmint.com: The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 10.

Keeping up with the Unitys: KDE's Plasma Netbook

Filed under
KDE

techworld.com.au: Last week when I wrote about Canonical’s decision to go with Unity on Wayland I mentioned traditional desktop interfaces are mostly unsuitable for more mobile computers, including tablets, phones and netbooks. I should have been more specific.

The Difference Engine: Linux's Achilles heel

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

economist.com: As for Linux, he has tried most of the popular distributions over the years, and has settled, for the time being, on Ubuntu to dish out files over the network, and Linux Mint as a desktop client for testing software.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust, Security, Things Gateway, Firefox and More

  • Rust pattern: Precise closure capture clauses
    This is the second in a series of posts about Rust compiler errors. Each one will talk about a particular error that I got recently and try to explain (a) why I am getting it and (b) how I fixed it. The purpose of this series of posts is partly to explain Rust, but partly just to gain data for myself. I may also write posts about errors I’m not getting – basically places where I anticipated an error, and used a pattern to avoid it. I hope that after writing enough of these posts, I or others will be able to synthesize some of these facts to make intermediate Rust material, or perhaps to improve the language itself.
  • This Week in Rust
  • Mozilla publishes recommendations on government vulnerability disclosure in Europe
    As we’ve argued on many occasions, effective government vulnerability disclosure (GVD) review processes can greatly enhance cybersecurity for governments, citizens, and companies, and help mitigate risk in an ever-broadening cyber threat landscape. In Europe, the EU is currently discussing a new legislative proposal to enhance cybersecurity across the bloc, the so-called ‘EU Cybersecurity Act’. In that context, we’ve just published our policy recommendations for lawmakers, in which we call on the EU to seize the opportunity to set a global policy norm for government vulnerability disclosure.
  • Testing Strategies for React and Redux
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
  • Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – April 20th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, micde, Jarrod Michell, Thomas Brooks.
  • Supporting Same-Site Cookies in Firefox 60
    Firefox 60 will introduce support for the same-site cookie attribute, which allows developers to gain more control over cookies. Since browsers will include cookies with every request to a website, most sites rely on this mechanism to determine whether users are logged in. Attackers can abuse the fact that cookies are automatically sent with every request to force a user to perform unwanted actions on the site where they are currently logged in. Such attacks, known as cross-site request forgeries (CSRF), allow attackers who control third-party code to perform fraudulent actions on the user’s behalf. Unfortunately current web architecture does not allow web applications to reliably distinguish between actions initiated by the user and those that are initiated by any of the third-party gadgets or scripts that they rely on.
  • Enterprise Policy Support in Firefox
    Last year, Mozilla ran a survey to find out top enterprise requirements for Firefox. Policy management (especially Windows Group Policy) was at the top of that list. For the past few months we’ve been working to build that support into Firefox in the form of a policy engine. The policy engine adds desktop configuration and customization features for enterprise users to Firefox. It works with any tool that wants to set policies including Windows Group Policy.
  • any.js
    Thanks to Ms2ger web-platform-tests is now even more awesome (not in the American sense). To avoid writing HTML boilerplate, web-platform-tests supports .window.js, .worker.js, and .any.js resources, for writing JavaScript that needs to run in a window, dedicated worker, or both at once. I very much recommend using these resource formats as they ease writing and reviewing tests and ensure APIs get tested across globals.
  • Alex Gibson: My fifth year working at Mozilla
    Today marks my fifth year working for Mozilla! This past year has been both fun and frantic, and overall was a really good year for both Mozilla and Firefox. Here’s a run down a few of the things I got to work on.

Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

  • Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28
    Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.
  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update
    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it.

Android Leftovers

Configuring local storage in Linux with Stratis

Configuring local storage is something desktop Linux users do very infrequently—maybe only once, during installation. Linux storage tech moves slowly, and many storage tools used 20 years ago are still used regularly today. But some things have improved since then. Why aren't people taking advantage of these new capabilities? This article is about Stratis, a new project that aims to bring storage advances to all Linux users, from the simple laptop single SSD to a hundred-disk array. Linux has the capabilities, but its lack of an easy-to-use solution has hindered widespread adoption. Stratis's goal is to make Linux's advanced storage features accessible. Read more