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Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Happy Birthday, Mozilla - and Thanks for Being Here

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Seven years ago, Mozilla 1.0 was launched. The Mozilla project was originally a browser *suite*, which included an email reader and a chat client as well as a browser.

Chrome on Linux: Rough, fast & promising

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I'd been waiting for Chrome on Linux since Chrome first showed up. Chrome, if you haven't tried it, is the speed-demon of Web browsers. I love it. But, until now, there really wasn't a version that would run natively on Linux.

GIMP Animation Package 2.6.0 Released

Filed under
GIMP

GAP 2.6.0 is a stable release of the video menu intended for use with the GIMP 2.6.x series. This release contains updates for video encoding/decoding, undo support for the storyboard feature and fixes for better compatibility with the GIMP 2.6.x releases.

Firefox 3.5: How Soon and How Big a Deal?

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews.com: Firefox 3.0 is not quite a year old, but users are already clamoring for Firefox 3.5. So where is it, and what is it all about?

Resellers to trial Red Hat Enterprise Linux V5.3

Filed under
Linux

crn.com.au: HP has partnered with Red Hat to develop a solution for RISC Migration projects. The solution offers Red Hat Enterprise Linux running on HP BladeSystems.

Novell - On the way to becoming a Linux business?

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: Novell's recently released figures for the second quarter of 2009 showed an 8.5 per cent drop in sales compared to the previous year – not a big surprise in light of the much debated economic crisis. However, one area of the business has enjoyed constant, indeed double-digit, growth over the last few years – Linux.

GNU Linux - Pros & Cons

Filed under
Linux

gauravlive.com: As with all things, GNU Linux too has pros & cons. Here I will try to give you a rough idea of both the sides of GNU Linux, so you can decide whether to take the plunge.

Winning the war won't secure peace for open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.co.uk: Open source may have won the argument, but that does not mean the world will now change, says Mark Taylor.

Miro - Internet TV

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Some of you may have heard of Miro before; it used to be known as the Democracy Player. For those who have not heard of Miro, it is a good-looking, versatile, modern multimedia application intended to open the taps of Internet media and stream music and videos onto users' desktops.

Google debuts Chrome for Mac, Linux

Filed under
Software

cnet.com: Google released Chrome for Mac OS X and Linux Thursday--but only in rough developer preview versions that the company warns are works in progress.

June 5, 2002: Browser, Philosophy Born of Turmoil, Defeat

Filed under
Moz/FF

wired.com: 2002: Mozilla 1.0 is released. The first major milestone for the open source browser doesn’t do much to impress users or shake loose Microsoft’s crown. However, it proves to the world that free software can succeed not just in the server room, but also on the desktop.

25 Sites about Fedora You Can’t Miss

Filed under
Linux
Web

2indya.com: Fedora is an open-source community developed operating system and there are many sites that provide help and support and other solutions for using it. Here is a compilation of 25.

Slackware and Zenwalk

Filed under
Linux

linux-blog.org: I’ve been distro shopping lately. I had become complacent while working with PCLinuxOS because everything just works when using it. After some initial toolings in Arch and Gentoo, I settled on Slackware…

Happy 5th Birthday, Phoronix!

Filed under
Web

phoronix.com: It was five years ago today, on the 5th of June 2004, that Phoronix.com launched. It was also one year ago to the day that Phoronix Test Suite 1.0 was released. Here are a few statistics and highlights from the past five years.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Apt URL Part Two

  • The Bourne Shell War On Terror
  • Fedora casts Mono into outer darkness
  • SEO Tools For Linux
  • Recovering from Linux freezes
  • Increased competition 'uncomfortable' for Firefox
  • Getting Started with Firewall Builder
  • Moving from Solaris to Linux
  • Install a large number of packages with aptitude
  • Howto Make Applications Start in Specified Workspace
  • Sony Ericsson Using Drupal
  • Share Folders Between a Linux Host and Linux Virtual Machine on VirtualBox
  • Of Open Standards, Interoperability and Open Source
  • My Open Source 'Leech' Is Your Open Source User
  • The irony of free-software advocacy
  • Far Cry 2 Linux Server
  • How to Get a Quake-style Drop-down Terminal in Linux
  • X Input 2.0 Merged Into The X Server
  • Open source clicking the channels
  • Mondo & Mindi - Disaster recovery solution
  • Searching PDF Files With grep
  • Atlassian's Summit, and its Freebies for Open Source Developers
  • This Week on Github: In Good Company
  • EasyTAG
  • Kundra advocates open source
  • Linux Outlaws 95 - All Those Sheep Got PDAs

Don't Get Me Wrong, Linux Sucks as Much as Windows

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com/blog: here is the latest hot trend in anti-Linux baloney: supposed Linux fans and advocates who really really love Linux and have been using it for years, but can't recommend it for anyone else because "It's not ready."

Intel buys Wind River to push Linux

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: Intel's acquisition of Wind River on Thursday is a strong push by the chip maker to extend Linux support across devices that use its processors, analysts said.

Review: Acer Aspire One D150

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Review: Acer Aspire One D150

  • Moblin 2.0 - A New Way to Make a Netbook Sing With Linux
  • Future of netbooks, laptops unfolds at Computex

The Case of the Disapearing Linux and other Mysteries of the Internet

Filed under
Linux

homelinux.com/blog: Lately I have noticed a pattern. It is mystery that keeps getting deeper and darker as I go along. It started with getting very tired of seeing “Windows only”, or “Windows and Mac Only,” or “Windows and Mac for now but Linux Support Coming Soon.”

Linux Driver Project Status Report as of June 2009

Filed under
Linux
Software

kroah.com: This is a status report for the Linux Driver Project as of June 2009, describing what has happened in the past year of work.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases