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Thursday, 19 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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9 Free, Open Source Tools for Video and Media Playback and Encoding

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: It wasn't that long ago that it was impossible to find good, free open source tools for working with and viewing video. Now that video runs rampant on the web, though, there are a whole lot of applications worth getting.

Applications to make your KDE more powerful and smarter

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Software

reviewglitz.com: KDE is a nice desktop manager for linux operating systems. KDE usually comes with almost everything you might need. But have you ever dreamed if you could make your kde better, smarter and powerful with more amazing applications? Here are a few.

Fragmentation and the RIA wars: Flash is the least bad solution

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Software

itwriting.com: The latest salvo in the Adobe Flash wars comes from the Free Software Foundation, in an open letter to Google. One thing the FSF misses is that Apple’s stance has not only “pushed web developers to make Flash-free alternatives of their pages”. It has also pushed developers into making Apple-specific apps as an alternative to web pages – which to my mind is unfortunate.

The Ubuntu Tomcat Disaster

Filed under
Ubuntu

totalimpactltd.com: I’ve gained quite a bit of respect for Ubuntu Server over the past year or so. Recently though, I’ve encountered an oddity that is simply too much to bear.

Oracle Explains Unclear Message About OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS

eweek.com: A posting on the company Web site implied that OpenSolaris may soon be "end-of-lifed." However, there's no need for app developers and IT managers to worry: Oracle says it is not killing off the freely down-loadable community version of Sun's Unix-based Solaris enterprise operating system anytime soon.

From Mandriva to Mint

Filed under
Linux

abhay-techzone.blogspot: I have liked Mandriva since Mandrake Linux 9.1. Its been an amazing distribution ever since. My wife's vaio completed 1 year and ran out of official warranty. The problem started right after the first install.

5 Linux distros I normally recommend to newbies

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Linux

ghabuntu.com: If you have friends or colleagues who you would like to have try the Linux OS, an important decision would be the distro you choose. There are over 500 out there and whatever distro you choose will be a great factor in shaping your friends view of Linux.

Missing Menu Icons?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Missing Menu Icons: What are GNOME playing at?
  • Ubuntu goin' gray, like the Mac OS way?
  • Gnome Icons: What the Devels are up to
  • what did icons ever do to you anyway?

In defence of Adobe Flash…?

Filed under
Software

If you believe Steve Jobs and an army of Apple apologists, Flash is the very scourge of the web — with sloppy, buggy code that no turtleneck-wearing cappuccino-sipping Mac fan in their right mind would want any part of.

On the other hand, Flash-based games on the web are pretty fun…

More here

Creating An NFS-Like Standalone Storage Server With GlusterFS On Fedora 12

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a standalone storage server on Fedora 12. Instead of NFS, I will use GlusterFS here. The client system will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Arduino – the hardware revolution
  • The best way to reduce software 'piracy'
  • Humor: Windows Tip of the Week
  • CloudLinux OS: Standing Out in the Linux Crowd?
  • London.gov.uk using Drupal
  • Archdiocese of Saint Louis Migrates to Drupal
  • Pogoplug Linux-powered file server appliance
  • Test driving some new features of KDE 4.4
  • Arista, a Multimedia transcoder for GNOME Desktop
  • one opinion about Ubuntu
  • Full Circle Podcast #1: Stop Wine-ing and Go Native!
  • Emesene Docky Integration Coming Soon
  • World's Funniest Computer Pictures
  • RHEL 5.5 Review - extra lube for your KVMs
  • RHT Poised To Benefit From Shift To Cloud
  • Yo Frankie! to be available for the masses in Ubuntu Lucid
  • Disable Annoying Beep on Mandriva 2010
  • Sell Linux on its merits
  • Gbrainy - Brain Teaser Game for Linux
  • KDE Sub-Project for Real Time Communication
  • Mandriva Joins ARM Connected Community
  • Knoppix 6.3 highlights

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • bash: read a specific line or/and a column from a file
  • Caught In the Loop? Awk While, Do While, For Loop
  • Use your favorite video as an animated Desktop or screensaver
  • MyHDL on Ubuntu
  • Gaupol - Subtitle editor for text-based subtitle files
  • On Backups
  • Quick and easy pop or imap server with Dovecot
  • Glade 3 + GtkBuilder + Anjuta Example
  • PC-BSD 8 installation guide
  • Install and Run Alliance P2P Software in Linux
  • How to setup Hauppauge-HVR-950Q in ubuntu 9.10
  • Project: Building An All-Text Linux Workstation - Part 11
  • The differences between useradd and adduser commands

ASUS' Xonar STX Gains Even More Functionality Under Linux

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Hardware

techgage.com: Ever since ASUS first released its Xonar line-up of cards, I knew I had to have one. But, being that I use Linux as a primary OS, I knew that the chance of me finding good support was slim.

Anti-Google Sentiment Reaches a Tipping Point

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Google

daniweb.com: Google Buzz was not a great moment in the history of Google. It seemed to bring to the surface a lot of lingering bad feelings that people have been having about Google for some time. The botched Buzz release only made it worse, confirming people's worst fears that Google didn't give a fig about your privacy.

Why Not Mplayer?

Filed under
Software

everyjoe.com: I just read an article about the top five Linux media players. Each media player mentioned in the article has its own strengths and weaknesses. And then when I got to the part of the comments, quite a number them asking the writer why was mplayer not included?

SimplyMEPIS 8.5 Reaches RC1

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS has announced SimplyMEPIS 8.4.98, RC1 of MEPIS 8.5, now available from MEPIS and public mirrors.

The number of Linux distros - A strength or weakness?

Filed under
Linux
  • The number of Linux distros - A strength or weakness?
  • too much choice can sometimes be a bad thing

When X decides to crash

Filed under
Software

apachelog.blogspot: Yesterday evening at 20:45 (UTC+1) I decide to do a good deed and help Mamarok help a Kubuntu user getting his system fixed. The symptoms sound quite familiar (apparently there also have been quite some cases of this): login doesn't work, get thrown back to KDM. OH MY!

Getting to Gno GNU Utilities

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: The GNU Project has provided dozens of useful utilities that you can find on almost every major Linux system, but many new Linux users have no idea where to start to learn these handy utilities.

Head to Head: Office 2010 vs Open Office 3.1

Filed under
OOo

itpro.co.uk: It's a battle of the office productivity suites as we look at how Office 2010 shapes up against its main open alternative. We find out which is best in this head to head review.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.