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About Tux Machines

Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AMD’s first ARM processors to feature 8-core servers Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 6:07pm
Story Bigger, better, faster: LibreOffice 4.2 Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 5:58pm
Story Professional Video Editor `Lightworks` 11.5 Goes Stable For Linux Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 5:49pm
Story Yesterday in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 31/01/2014 - 5:17pm
Story Keep Tabs on Income and Expenses with My Expenses for Android Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 5:24pm
Story LibreOffice 4.2 Brings OpenCL Calc, OOXML Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 4:42pm
Story How Linux dominates the mobile market Roy Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 2:16pm
Story Enlightenment 0.18.3 Release Allows the Use of Elementary 1.9 or Later Roy Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 12:04pm
Story Open Standards and Open Source make a great pairing Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 9:30am
Story Like Arduino? Miniaturize your project with TinyCircuits Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 9:22am

Zen and the Art of the Six-Figure Linux Job

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: You’ve heard the stereotypes and the misconceptions. Since Linux is free software, the developers who create it are paid next to nothing, right? Wrong.

Seven habits for writing secure PHP applications

Filed under
Web

These seven habits for writing more secure PHP Web applications will help you avoid becoming an easy victim of malicious attacks. Like many habits, they may seem awkward at first, but they become more natural as time goes on.

Top 5 Least Popular Linux Distributions That Could

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: During my Distro hopping days, I have tried and tested different flavors of Linux. Let's focus on the following Linux distributions that some of us may consider least popular, but are highly capable of becoming way bigger than what they are today.

Konqueror, The Powerful KDE Browser

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: So far, all of the browsers that I reviewed for this book have been Gnome-based browsers. Epiphany is a Gnome-sponsored project, and Firefox is rapidly moving towards Gnomeization (though at the time of this writing, a Qt port of Firefox is under heavy development). What’s a good KDE user to do? Simple: use the conqueror of the browser market, Konqueror.

Linux speaks your instant messaging dialect

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: No matter your flavour of instant messenger (IM) client, Linux has you covered. With the open source program Pidgin you can talk freely.

If Linux Distributions Were Footballers..

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: This is just a bit of fun, blending my two great loves, Linux and football. I make no apology for the English Premiership-centric choices. Indeed, I'd welcome any other suggestions from around the globe...

PCLinuxOS 2007

Filed under
PCLOS

ldp.ifroog.com: I was extremely happy with Arch, and it convinced me that Ubuntu was too bloated, and that GNOME hurts my eyes. Arch randomly crashed, and I was in a distro-hopping mood, so I decided to try PCLOS.

Ubuntu: Beauty And Power

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: What is an OS? A way to make a collection of words, pictures, videos, content, show up on a screen? A way for us to take ideas out of our heads and put them into a form that is accessible by another? For me this is Ubuntu, and, as the saying goes, it just works.

Acquia out of beta

Filed under
Drupal

drupal.org: After months of hard work, Acquia is now open for business! Starting today, everyone can connect their Drupal 6 site to the Acquia Network to take advantage of our services. Oh my!

Also: Acquia Delivers Commercially Supported Drupal

How To Install VMware Server 2 On An Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server 2 on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system.

Build It: A Sub-$250 Desktop PC

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

pcmag.com: Why spend more than you should on a cheap PC that you buy retail? In less than 30 minutes, you can build an ultra-low-budget Linux PC that can handle a multitude of everyday tasks.

Renaming Ubuntu derivatives

Filed under
Ubuntu

fabrizioballiano.net: Working together with the Ubuntu trademarks team we renamed our Ubuntu derivatives:

Bits from the Debian Project Leader

Filed under
Linux

Steve McIntyre: In the last couple of months, I was ill for 3
weeks (as you may have seen from my blog post[1]) and otherwise very
busy. I've been struggling to catch up with everything, but I think
I'm just about there. So, what's up?

Linux Foundation plans more open open-source conference

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux Foundation plans new, more open open-source conference next year

  • Linux Foundation launches new conference
  • Greetings from Tokyo Open Source Conference
  • GPL v3 Project Watch List for Week of 09/19
  • Teaching Open Source @ FSOSS 2008

KpackageKit: future of package managers on your desktop [interview with developers]

Filed under
Software
Interviews

polishlinux.org: PackageKit is a system designed to make installing and updating software on your computer easier. The primary design goal is to unify all the software graphical tools used in different distributions. KPackageKit is the KDE interface for PackageKit. Today we talk with Packagekit-Qt and KpackageKit developers about new emerging possibilities in process of managing software on your desktop.

10 Cool Products For An Open Source World

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

crn.com: From mobile phones to network infrastructure to fun desktop applications, here's a look at 10 products that embrace Linux and other open source ways of life.

easys GNU/Linux 4.2 released

Filed under
Linux

easys GNU/Linux 4.2 has been released and ships the latest KDE Desktop (version 4.1.1) which makes use of QT4. QT3/KDE3-Apps can still be launched with a compat library.

The previous office suite Softmaker Office has been replaced by KOffice which offers enhancements and new functionality like a presentation program. A current version of the Firefox web browser is included.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Omega 10 Desktop Linux

  • When Linux goes bad: the e1000e Ethernet bug
  • What Microsoft Still Does Not Get
  • Open source and the blame game
  • OpenSolaris Granularity
  • Howto: Burn ISO to cdrom from command line
  • What happened to Gentoo?
  • Ubuntu up and running on Pandora
  • OpenOffice.org Power Tools
  • Interview: John VanDyk, Author of Pro Drupal Development
  • Ubuntu vs Windows 2-1
  • Another Open Source Feather In Microsoft's Cap
  • Mini-Review: Asus Eee PC 1000 vs. MSI Wind
  • Review: SuperTux 0.1.3

new podcasts

Filed under
Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Configuring an Apache Linux Server

  • Control Apache with the apachectl command
  • Unix 101: File Attributes
  • Simplify email with Smail
  • Compiz without fglrx on openSUSE 11.1
  • HowTO: Edit Boot Loader to add/modify/delete entries in openSUSE
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ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues. Read more

Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more