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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 201403 review Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 7:36am
Story Early Look at How Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Is Shaping Up Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 7:35am
Story Linux Video of the Week: Yocto Project Saves Embedded Linux Devs from Frankenstein OS Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 7:21am
Story Ubuntu Gnome wants to get LTS status Roy Schestowitz 08/03/2014 - 7:12am
Story MATE 1.8 is finally released Rianne Schestowitz 1 07/03/2014 - 9:02pm
Story Registration opens for Document Freedom Day 2014 Roy Schestowitz 07/03/2014 - 8:54pm
Story AllCast adds DLNA support Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2014 - 6:58pm
Story Attack of the 64-bit Octa-core: A Roundup of Newly Announced Mobile Processors Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2014 - 6:52pm
Story HP 8 1401 Android tablet launched at $170 Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2014 - 6:37pm
Story If Beast Died Tomorrow, Chromebook 2 Could Be Its Replacement Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2014 - 6:31pm

Compiz Fusion and MPX and Input Redirection Patches are now out

Filed under

smspillaz.wordpress: I figured that I should publish these before murphy’s law ensures that I either have a 1% chance of living the next day, or that the Australian Government censors me.

How To Upgrade Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) To 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) (Desktop & Server)

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Today the new Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) has been released. This guide shows how you can upgrade your Ubuntu 8.04 desktop and server installations to Ubuntu 8.10.

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • Linux Operating System

  • Too Late For Halloween - Almost Linux/Unix Humor
  • Building Online Success With Drupal
  • BBC prepares to stream content free to Linux users
  • Interview: Chris Morgan on Jopr
  • GDM 2.24 aka SMB (Shoot Me Bloody)
  • Selected Ibex Bugs
  • Linux to out ship Windows by next year … maybe not!
  • Four True Tech Horror Stories
  • Windows 7: Microsoft's Linux killer?
  • New beta version of Google's Chrome browser

some howtos:

Filed under
  • How to install KDE 4.1 on Ubuntu 8.10

  • Controlling fanspeeds in Linux on PWM motherboards, Thinkpads and ASUS Eee PC
  • How to properly start compiz in Gnome
  • Restoring Data from rdiff-backup
  • Create a LAN for Virtual Servers with KVM and VDE
  • Installing Microsoft Office and Internet Explorer in openSUSE with Crossover
  • Free Memory by dropping caches
  • Using Calc to manage schedules
  • Transparent compression of files on optical media
  • How To Easily Add A Custom Search Engine To Your Firefox Search Bar

A Halloween blog of open source fog

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blogs.the451group: I like to write a Halloween-theme article or blog every year, and this year, there is no shortage of costuming and character portrayal from vendors turning up in places you’d never expect them.

Does Linux Deliver For Small Businesses?

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Linux The answer is Yes, it does, though with some qualifications. The short answer: it's all in the implementation. The long answer starts with taking a look at Canonical's successes in opening new doors for Linux deployments.

OpenSUSE Starts Steering its Own Course

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SUSE It's not easy for a Linux company to let go the reins of control over its community Linux distribution. Just ask Red Hat, which started to let go of Fedora and then decided to keep managing it (Red Hat keeps its grip on Fedora). But, now Novell is loosening its apron strings on its community Linux openSUSE.

Also: RealPlayer dropped from openSUSE, here’s why
And: Status update for openSUSE 11.1 beta 4

more ubuntu stuff

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  • The Call of Cthubuntu

  • Ubuntu 8.10 Charges Up the Mountain
  • First Look: Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop Edition, Intrepid Ibex
  • Ubuntu 8.10: Canonical Improves Marketing And PR Focus
  • 10 Things To Do After You Install Ubuntu Linux

Using Your Linux Computer As A Media Server (Part 2)

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Software Previously, I have discussed how you can use your Linux computer as a media center. Now, if you are not in front of your Linux machine most of the time, but still want to access all your media files from any internet connected devices such as your smart phone, workplace computer, PDA or even PS3, the only option is to set up your Linux computer as a media server and stream your multimedia content to wherever you are over the internet.

'Mandriva Linux 2009.0 Review : A Mixed Bag'

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MDV Mandriva 2009.0 features latest Desktop Environments, tools and application to attract more and more users .. Tagged the most user friendly distro , Mandriva 2009.0 try to live up to the expectations … Mandriva 2009.0 packs in a lot of changes including the inclusion of the latest gun of Open Source community.

20+ Firefox 3 Security and Privacy Extensions

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Moz/FF While Firefox is considered a safe browser by most people, it can never hurt to add more layers of security in this day and age. And while you’re at it, there are a number of ways to increase your privacy online. Here are over 20.

some shorts

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  • Funny FireFox Ads

  • Linux Journal Live - Horror Stories
  • Linux Basement - Episode 30 - Season Finale and OLF

How Linux Supports More Devices Than Any Other OS, Ever

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Interviews Kroah-Hartman is a longtime developer of the Linux kernel, known for his work maintaining USB drivers as well as for packaging the SUSE kernel at Novell. O'Reilly Media recently interviewed Greg about his claim that the Linux kernel now supports more devices than any other operating system ever.

some ubuntu stuff

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  • Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex': Some Good, Some Bad, And A Lot Of Ugly

  • A User's Look at Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex
  • Solutions for Nvidia restricted drivers after Ubuntu 8.10 Upgrade
  • Beware Ubuntu 8.10 “Cruft Remover”

Switching your kids to Linux

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Linux Based on some of the feedback on my previous postings, there seems to be some interest in this topic. I'm sure that this is more like Perl than Python (there is more than one way to do it), but this is how I managed it....

New Qt Creator IDE from Qt Software

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Software News emerged recently that Qt Software (formerly Trolltech) were working on their first IDE for Qt, code named Project Greenhouse. Today saw the release of the first technical preview under the name Qt Creator. The initial release is available for Linux, Mac OS X and MS Windows.

The scariest video game of all time

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Gaming Last week we asked our readers to vote for the most frightening game of all time. The votes have been counted and the results are in - our readers reveal their top 15 pixilated horrors.

This is the money being made TODAY in Open Source

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OSS While many companies don’t disclose detailed financial information we have dug around to find numbers for some well-known open source companies and projects to see how they are doing financially.

15 Scariest Tux Icons for Halloween

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Linux Since it's Halloween, let me give you a treat by sharing to you all some of the scariest tux icons in existence. Before going on, let me warn those with a weak heart that what you are about to see could be dangerous to your health.

The Scariest Things in Open Source

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OSS Since today is Halloween, I thought that an article discussing some of the scary things in the FOSS world would be a nice touch. What are the scariest things in Open Source?

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.