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Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Surfing Since 1991: The Evolution of Web Browsers

Filed under
Software

maximumpc.com: In order to surf the web, you need a web browser, and today there are several different ones to choose from. No matter which browser you choose to surf the web with, the features you take for granted today are the result of nearly two decades of browser design.

Which netbook OS is right for you?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Windows 7 is here, and unlike Windows Vista, it will probably run on your diminutive netbook PC. However, there is an alternative. Here is why you ought to give Linux a shot.

FUDCon Toronto 2009

Filed under
Linux

If Moonlight is so hot, why isn't Novell using it?

Filed under
SUSE

itwire.com: When a company announces a technology release, the least one would expect is that the company itself has found said technology worthy of use.

Red Hat CEO Likens Company to Facebook, Wikipedia in Collaborative Innovation

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: Jim Whitehurst says that Red Hat is "defining a whole new business model... Open source is nothing but a specific instance of the power of participation. It's applying the power of participation as Facebook or Wikipedia do, specific to computer source code."

Linux vendor revenue $1 billion by 2012? Or is it $49 billion+ ?

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Linux

blog.internetnews.com: IDC is out with a new report forecasting Linux revenue from 2009-2013. According to a post on the data, from Novell CMO John Dragoon, in 2008, the Linux vendor community saw a 23.4 percent growth in revenue.

Drizzle for Christmas - year-end-prediction for MySQL fork

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: A production ready version of the MySQL fork Drizzle could be ready by the end of this year.

SUSE Studio Review

Filed under
SUSE

Linux's Desktop Growing Pains

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: It's long past time to stop talking about Linux as the hotshot new upstart, and to demand the same things from it as any other environment. That means no more excuses about what's to come, but results right now -- especially on the desktop.

Moonlight 2 arrives and falls flat on its face

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: The other day, Novell's Mono Project, announced the beta release of Moonlight 2. IN theory, this enables Linux users to watch Microsoft Silverlight encoded content. Of course, that begs the question: "What Silverlight content?"

Open Source Likes Green IT

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: For years now, there's been talk brewing about the concept of Green IT. Pundits have predicted in years past that sustainable IT would be "job one" soon--really soon. So where does open source software fit into the mix? How green is the GPL? Pretty green, if you ask me. In fact, companies that already use open source software are well on the way to greening their IT departments.

CentOS users remain faithful despite developer shakeup

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Administrators using CentOS, the free open source operating system built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, remain confident about the long-term stability of the OS, despite a recent shakeup prompted by the seeming disappearance of a CentOS administrator and co-founder.

Open Source for America Welcomes The Linux Box as Latest Member in Advocating Open Source in the U.S. Federal Government

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Linux

Joining a broad cross-section of more than 1,000 companies, academic institutions, communities, related groups and individuals, The Linux Box is now part of Open Source for America, a unified voice for the promotion of open source in the U.S. Federal government sector.

Most Popular Open Source Non-Linux Based Operating Systems

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OS

pluggd.in: Whenever you mention the phrase Open Source, most people think of Linux. Such is it’s popularity that even people not familiar with open source software have still heard of this mystical, geeky “software” called Linux. I think there is far more to Open Source than Linux.

OpenOffice.org and the 'Ribbons' Interface Brouhaha

Filed under
OOo

earthweb.com: Two weeks ago Project Renaissance unveiled its first prototype. The prototype resembled the Ribbon interface first introduced in Microsoft Office 2007, and the denunciations came so fast that few bothered to check the facts, or to give the idea any serious consideration.

6 Things all prospective Ubuntu Linux users should know

Filed under
Ubuntu

sinaisix.blogspot: If you have heard about Ubuntu but are still doubting whether to migrate to it or not, then the following six basic points should help you decide.

Ubuntu 9.10 vs Windows 7: No Ordinary October Showdown

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Canonical’s Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) and Microsoft’s Windows 7 are expected to debut within days of one another in October 2009. Some open source pundits will surely hype a showdown between the two operating systems.

Showdown: Fedora 11 vs Mandriva 2009.1

Filed under
Linux
MDV

thelinuxexperiment.com: After a couple of weeks of research I have finally narrowed down my choice to either Fedora 11 or Mandriva 2009.1 to use during the course of this experiment. The two distros are both very mature and feature rich which makes this choice extraordinarily difficult.

Top 5 Linux Video Editor Software

Filed under
Software

cyberciti.biz: A non-linear editing system (NLE) is a video editing (NLVE) or audio editing (NLAE) system which can provide editing method for video clips or frams. You will be able to access any frame in a video clip. Non-linear editing is done for film and television post-production.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and Software Leftovers

  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows
    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.
  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan
    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.
  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released
    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.
  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser
    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.
  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux
    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.
  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms
    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE