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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Running The Linux 2.6.35 Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Running The Linux 2.6.35 Kernel With A Core i7 Notebook
  • LinuxUsers Kernel column #90 – the state of the kernel

Is Ubuntu becoming more of a pain to set up than Windows?

Filed under
Ubuntu

izanbardprince.wordpress: Setting up a new installation of Ubuntu Maverick made me think…

BSD Magazine 08/2010 Issue Available

Filed under
BSD

The BSD Magazine editors have uploaded a new issue: BSD as Operating System. Highlights: Introduction to MidnightBSD, The FreeBSD Ubuntu challenge, and Maintenance Systems over BSD.

Sabayon 5.3 Xfce & Lxde - a few impressions

Filed under
Linux

all-things-linux.blogspot: In 5.3 Sabayon comes with a much cleaner more professional looking default background in dark blue. Not too heavy on the eyes the way I like it, however compared to previous releases it's also easy their most boring background so far.

For Kevin Mitnick, staying legal is job one

Filed under
OSS

cnet.com: Kevin Mitnick was eager to participate in a social-engineering contest at the Defcon hacker conference in Las Vegas last weekend and was told he would target Microsoft in the event.

Is Google About to Sell the Internet Down the River?

Filed under
Google
Web

blogs.computerworlduk: So far, so conventional. But there is a joker in the pack in this game: Google. It's striking that the bigger the company gets, the more it moves away from its natural geek roots, and its reflexive defence of everything that is important to hackers.

Live Kernel Patches with Ksplice

Filed under
Linux

Avoid reboots of your system with live Kernel updates using Ksplice

Fedora 13 Samba Standalone Server With tdbsam Backend

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial explains the installation of a Samba fileserver on Fedora 13 and how to configure it to share files over the SMB protocol as well as how to add users. Samba is configured as a standalone server, not as a domain controller. In the resulting setup, every user has his own home directory accessible via the SMB protocol and all users have a shared directory with read-/write access.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Amadeus systems to sit on Linux by 2012
  • What happens when not upgrading Gentoo Linux for… a while
  • OAA to Improve Internet Access for the Aging, Disabled
  • SFC wins default judgement against GPL violator
  • Canonical might want to buy openSUSE (rumor)
  • New cloud-init Features in Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat
  • Regnum Online Characters Are Now Transferable
  • Fixed: The Linux Desktop Responsiveness Problem?
  • BlueDevil 1.0rc2 released
  • Give Your Netbook an OS Makeover with Jolicloud
  • Build openSUSE 11.3 appliances now
  • What Does Your Desktop Look Like?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • record audio from mic using FFmpeg aka audio grabbing
  • Create High Quality Drum Beats with Hydrogen
  • Configure Wine Ubuntu For Running Windows Based Games
  • Adventures in Puppet: concat module
  • Adventures in Puppet: Tangled Strings
  • Use pwsafe as a keyboard shortcut driven X tool
  • Connecting iPhone to Linux Using OpenSSH and FileZilla
  • openSUSE Software search trick
  • fsck, mountall, /var and Lucid
  • GCstar - An application for managing your movie/games collection
  • How to install Gentoo using a Ubuntu 10.04 Live CD
  • Fixing "WMID devices" Error on Your Netbook
  • Nautilus Thumbnails With 3D-ish Drop-Shadow Effect
  • Trimage - lossless optimizing PNG and JPG files
  • Top like utility to monitor Network - sntop
  • Fixing Wireless in OpenSuSE 11.3 and Dell Studio Laptops
  • Pidgin Embedded Video, Now With Image Support Too

FreeBSD 8.1 uses different open source philosophy

Filed under
BSD

freebsdnews.net: FreeBSD may not receive the attention that Linux does, but its latest upgrade could provide some instruction to the makers of Ubuntu about how to do open source releases.

Unusual Trading Activity for Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu: Eight Long-term Reality Checks

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: It’s been roughly two-and-a-half years since Nine Lives Media Inc. launched WorksWithU. When we started this site we made a few assumptions about Ubuntu. How have those assumptions evolved from 2008 to 2010t?

11 Free Linux Apps Your Business Needs Now

Filed under
Software

networkworld.com: Despite the wealth of free applications out there, many small business owners continue to spend an inordinate amount of their all-too-scarce resources on software. The good news is that there are free and open-source alternatives for virtually every package a small business might need.

Three strikes with Ubuntu video editors

Filed under
Software

openattitude.com: I honestly thought that the hardest part of editing video on my Linux Mint computer would be capturing the video footage to my hard drive. Turns out I was wrong. Very wrong.

Not Having Linux Skills is IT Malpractice

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Some things seem so obvious I feel silly even saying them. And this is one of them: any IT staffer who only knows one operating system is not worth hiring.

10 differences between Linux and BSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

blogs.techrepublic.com: Despite a common tendency to gloss over the differences, Linux and BSD have a number of characteristics that set them apart from one another. Jack Wallen points out several important distinctions.

Unix How-To: Give Me That Old-Time Security!

Filed under
Security
HowTos

itworld.com: Even in the wild frontiers of today's Internet, good basic Unix system security provides extremely valuable protection against security breaches. In today's column, I'm going to rant about some basic security rules of thumb that every Unix sysadmin ought to consider.

Six open source projects you should be using

Filed under
Software
OSS

infoworld.com: The employees who do the actual work in IT can use all the help they can get; these open source tools are handier than most

August 2010 Issue of The PCLOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the August 2010 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. In this issue: Linux IS Ready For The Desktop, Video Encoding: Step-By-Step, and Screenshot Showcase.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level
    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out. GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment
    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.
  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?
    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.
  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships
    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.