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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Razer teases Android TV-based microconsole Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 4:15pm
Story Raspberry Pi NOOBS 1.3.8: Get it, try it, and have fun Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 4:12pm
Story MIT scientists create 36-core chip speed demon Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 3:33pm
Story What's Next For Fedora? Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 3:31pm
Story With Android L, Google makes pitch for enterprise users Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:50am
Story New Features Coming For Qt 5.4 Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:45am
Story Why Raspberry Pi is still the white knight of education Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:21am
Story Where KDE is going - Part 1 Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 9:49am
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 6.0r1 Is an Interesting Debian and GNOME 3.10 Mix Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 9:12am
Story The big takeaway from Google I/O: Linux everywhere Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 9:07am

Linux saves the day: why every good toolkit should have Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: No matter if you're exclusively a Windows shop, every good IT technician needs Linux in their toolkit. A bootable Linux CD has saved my bacon more than once.

Hands-on with Mozilla Labs' new tab prototypes

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla Labs has released an experimental Firefox extension that brings new functionality to blank tab pages.

Plymouth Packages For Ubuntu Are Now Available

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last November we learned that Plymouth would replace USplash in Ubuntu. However, for those not interested in trying out Fedora to see Red Hat's Plymouth, there is a package repository of Plymouth packages for Ubuntu available.

Getting Things Gnome! 0.1 - "Just 5 minutes more"

Filed under
Software

frimouvy.org: Bertrand and I are very proud to announce you the first release of Getting Thing Gnome!, a personal organizer and todo list manager for the GNOME desktop.

'Firefox Web Developer' is a hidden security gem

Filed under
Moz/FF

techtarget.com.au: Have you ever come across a situation where you've needed a tool but didn't think you had the right one to get the job done? Like when you're trying to change a smoke detector battery or tighten a loose door knob -- it seems as if the tool you need is never handy.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #132

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #132 for the week of March 1st- March 7th, 2009 is now available.

Where Are All The Linux Netbooks?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: I've read almost a dozen articles in the past week about Netbook computers and am sorely disappointed with some of the news about them. The general consensus is that Windows dominates the Netbook space.

How Linux Can Finally Rise Above Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently I had a chat with another member of the Linux media about what Linux really needs to do in order to finally reach the masses. The conclusion?

Quick fixes for common Linux problems

Filed under
HowTos

techradar.com: We'll come right out and say this – Linux breaks. No matter how much we might like our chosen distro, there is no denying that things can go wrong. So here's our guide to dealing with some of the most common problems, and some advice on how to deal.

Desktop Linux - Felicia Failed in My Office

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: After much discussion my CEO agreed to deploy Linux in our Content Department. Next, the issue on the table was which distribution to deploy.

MSFT vs TomTom: The Q&A

redmonk.com: While it’s true that you hear it here last, generally, a week is a bit much, even for me. But as we’re still fielding questions about the news that Microsoft had filed a complaint over alleged infringed patents against TomTom, Dutch manufacturer of navigation systems, it seems necessary to comment.

Ubuntu is based on Debian unstable

Filed under
Ubuntu

mdzlog.wordpress: From time to time, I see someone remark that Ubuntu uses packages from Debian unstable, and that they don’t think this is a very good idea. I would like to explain why we do this and how it works, and hope that this will enable a less one-sided view of the subject.

Open source microbloggers you should follow

Filed under
OSS

tuxradar.com: If you're a fan of Identi.ca or Twitter and want to follow the alpha geeks of the free sofware world, we've put together a list of people to make it easy for you to find them.

Three Easy Steps to Set-up Anonymous Web Browsing on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

junauza.com: This simple guide will enable you to surf the web anonymously while using Firefox on Linux. But to do this, you will need to install these two important tools.

Qimo, Linux 4 Kids

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: WHAT is a good age to introduce children to Linux/Free Open Source Software? My children are nine, and they regularly use FOSS without actually realising it or, I suspect, caring.

When the Linux missionaries come a-callin

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: No one is a bigger fan of Linux more than I. I am sold on it lock, stock and barrel. However, There is liking Linux, encouraging people to try Linux and then there are the Linux missionaries for whom Linux has become a religion.

Freedom vs. Control

Filed under
OSS

mr-oss.com: The lack of Linux tools which can modify enterprise wide linux deployments is helping to slow it's adoption. Linux philosophy is based around freedom from the control. The control is in the hands of the user and the enterprise administer is left out in the cold.

U.S. Schools: Not Ready For Linux

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: US schools are not yet ready for Linux. Yes sad to say, it is not because they can’t do Linux or don’t need a feasible, safe and renewable source for technology. US schools are not ready to accept Linux because they don’t feel the need.

How to run a successful Linux User Group

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If there was one thing Linux Format magazine learned from the Readers' Round Table event it organised, it was that us Linux folk like to get out and have a good chat.

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V).

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more