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Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Win back your digital independence with Mandriva srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 4:02pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 5:09am
Story 5 Intriguing New Features in Linux 3.10 srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 2:29am
Story Change OSS Licenses to Make More Money? srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 1:00am
Story A Desktop Seismic Shift to Qt srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 12:57am
Story Is Windows use an addiction? srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 12:56am
Story Wargaming Mobilizes with Linux and Open Source srlinuxx 03/07/2013 - 11:46pm
Story In a World Without Open Source srlinuxx 03/07/2013 - 8:22pm
Story AMD Joins TDF Advisory Board To Accelerate LibreOffice srlinuxx 03/07/2013 - 8:20pm
Story The Unwitting Linux Saboteurs srlinuxx 03/07/2013 - 8:19pm

My first hours with PCLINUXOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Ubuntu

web4beta.com: As a mentioned in my previous post I spent a little time last night installing PCLINUXOS on my laptop. I installed the MiniMe version of the distro, the Live CD of which weighs in at just over 200MB. It’s meant to be just enough to get get everything up and running so you can then, through ATP or Synaptic, install just the software you want.

A User's Freedom to Choose

Filed under
KDE

linuxtoday.com: There has been a lot of vitriol lofted towards the KDE 4 development folks lately, with calls for forking and the questioning of the need for users getting lobbed back and forth between the two sides of the argument. Emotions are running high, and there seems to be no way of resolving the issues that have gotten people so upset.

KDE Developer Quits

Filed under
KDE

practical-tech.com: Recently though several KDE developers came right out and asked, “Does KDE even need (certain) users?” Unrau’s opinion was quickly seconded by another KDE developer, Jason Harris, who said, “KDE, like many other open-source projects, doesn’t really need users at all. In the end though, KDE has ended up with at least one less developer.

Why I Hate KDE? Paradigm

Filed under
KDE

isriya.com: This story has begun by a blog post from a man called Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols. The reason why I don’t use KDE is obvious: Paradigm. (or perspective, way of thinking, approach).

There’s Something About Pardus 2008

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Because Pardus 2007 left a lasting impression on me, I have been eagerly waiting for its next release. So when the stable version of Pardus 2008 came out just recently, I never hesitated to try and test this promising distro from Turkey once again.

6 Free Tools For Creating Top-Notch Documents

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: I use a ton of software applications, but a major portion of the time I spend using a computer goes to writing, and creating documents. In this post, I'll cover six free applications--five of them open source and one freeware app--that can help you create eye-catching documents.

OpenOffice.org extension will add PDF editing

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: Easy PDF editing is coming to OpenOffice.org, but you'll have to be patient for a few months. Recently posted to the OpenOffice.org Extensions site, the Sun PDF Import extension (SPI) is only in beta, and only works with recent developer builds of OpenOffice.org 3.0, which is scheduled for September release.

ATI Radeon HD 4870 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: A week ago we looked at the brand-new ATI Radeon HD 4850 graphics card under Linux. This graphics card launch was unlike any in ATI's history. Today we're publishing our complete review of the new ATI Radeon HD 4870 512MB as well as delivering additional benchmarks from the Radeon HD 4850 under Linux, of course.

Beyond the desktop with KDE4

Filed under
KDE

tectonic.co.za: Lately, there has been quite some bitching on the fringes of the KDE project about KDE4 and the direction it takes. Some people go as far as saying: “Give us back our old desktop!” I beg to differ.

Sidux, a Great Alternative to Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Sidux is a new Debian derivative that's still just a baby, born in January 2007. Sidux announced a brand-new release on June 26, Sidux 2008-02, so we're going to kick the tires and take it for a drive, and see what sets it apart from other children of Debian.

OpenSUSE 11…a lot of new goodness, a lot of old goodness

Filed under
SUSE

labyrinth.org: Well I know compared to most people I am writing down my opinion of the latest OpenSUSE release a little late but…I wanted to try it out a bit, kick the tires before I put anything on here about it. And I am certainly glad I did.

Fedora 9 & KDE 4 review

Filed under
Linux

inatux.com/blog: Fedora 9 with default installation, starts you with the Gnome Desktop Environment, but all of us here at InaTux personally prefer KDE. So, we went through the installation process once more and changed "Customize later" to "Customize now."

An introduction to the Kismet packet sniffer

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Kismet is a wireless "detector, sniffer, and intrusion detection system," and one of the growing list of essential open source tools for computer network security professionals. Kismet runs on any POSIX-compliant platform, including Windows, Mac OS X, and BSD, but Linux is the preferred platform.

Home automation in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Home Automation is anything that your home does for you automatically to make living there more enjoyable or productive. It covers many areas, including remote and timed control of lights and electrical home appliances, distributed media services, and communication. In this introductory article, I will carry out a high-level review of a number of these projects to see what is already available.

KDE vs. GNOME: A Screed from a Supposed Corporate Flack

Filed under
Software

opsamericas.com: Ok, so you know that currently SLED (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop) 10 defaults to GNOME as the desktop, a move that garnered a few cranky folks from the KDE [KC]amp. openSUSE 11.0 doesn’t force such a choice, you have several options, none is selected by default.

Xandros acquisition of Linspire may keep both outfits afloat

Filed under
Linux

theinquirer.net: That Xandros is preloaded on Asus Eee PC netbooks is perhaps its only real support, and that might be the only reason this acquisition happened, instead of both of these unevenly integrated and struggling, third-tier wanna-be consumer Linux distributions simply failing.

Openmoko to release Linux handset tomorrow

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Anyone fond of creating their own applications within a open source environment will soon be able to get mobile. Openmoko has finally announced the launch date of its Neo FreeRunner open-source phone.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 29

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #29 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: openSUSE 11.1 Roadmap, Novell Client for Linux Public Beta for openSUSE 10.3, and People of openSUSE: Jan-Simon Möller.

Quick look: Asus's Eee PC 901 and 1000

Filed under
Hardware

computerworld.com: Taiwan's Asustek Computer (Asus), the leader of the mini-notebook category due to its early launch of the Eee PC, launched two new models of the family last month, the 901 and 1000, the first Eee PCs that use Intel's Atom microprocessor.

Kaffeine 0.8.6 Review

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: When it comes to video players, Kaffeine is my favourite, several reasons for it being that it plays anything I feed it with, it has good subtitle support and the interface it provides is clean and simple to use.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.