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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Goodbye Mageia 2 Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 6:50pm
Story A Summer Spent on the LLVM Clang Static Analyzer for the Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 6:39pm
Story Red Hat Launches Latest Version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 6:33pm
Story ARM-based Ubuntu Servers: Ready for Partners? Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 6:26pm
Story What Android 4.4 KitKat will bring to your current smartphone Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 6:22pm
Story The Rise of Linux in Embedded Systems Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 5:28pm
Story Qualcomm's Toq smartwatch coming December 2nd for $349.99 Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:36pm
Story Ouya goes white with new limited edition, more expensive microconsole Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:31pm
Story PyPy 2.2 released Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:20pm
Story Top 20 mobile skills in demand Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:15pm

The community Linux impact

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: A recent talk I led about community Linux and Ubuntu in the enterprise at LinuxWorld generated some discussion over at Slashdot. I can’t say that I completely agree with the headline, ‘Paid support not critical for Linux adoption.’ Well, not critical to some adoption. If we’re talking about the enterprise, and particularly if we’re talking large enterprise, paid support is absolutely, positively critical to use of Linux.

Announcing ENOS 2008

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The acronym ENOS stands for ‘Encontro Nacional de openSUSE‘, a Portuguese expression which can be translated to ‘National openSUSE Meeting‘, an event meant to unite the Portuguese openSUSE users, as well as provide the participants an inside view into the latest developments in the openSUSE project and stimulate them to take an active part in the community itself.

Giving an old Windows hand some Linux advice

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: I see my colleague Preston Gralla is looking for the best Linux for a Windows pro. That's a good question with several good answers.

Why lawyers don't like Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Professionals who work on the basis of billable hours rarely take the time out to write an article for publication unless they have a valid reason for doing so. That's why I'm generally a bit sceptical when lawyers come out with articles that attempt to make a case against the use of free and open source sofware.

The kids are all right with Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: School starts early in Georgia. The kids are all back at it. It was on a pre-semester visit to my son’s high school that I got a shock on Friday. Linux.

Why Vista is not ready for Linux and Mac users

Filed under
Microsoft

izanbardprince.wordpress: I’ve started my simulated migration from Linux to Vista already, starting my dog food challenge two days early, I will go over my findings so far, sometimes making the assumptions a new Windows user would, and mostly from the perspective of a Linux “switcher”, with a dose of sarcasm.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu devs are considering using empathy as default for Intrepid

  • Why GnomeBaker and Brasero Aren't Standard on Gnome
  • Ubuntu: Intrepid Ibex - A quick look at Empathy
  • Ubuntu Podcast Episode #4
  • How I plan on fixing Wine for Intrepid

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 265

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Meet LoLiTa - the Linux user's group of French Polynesia

  • News: openSUSE KDE3 live CDs, Debian 5.0 and Fedora 10 features, mixed fortunes for Linspire and Freespire, updates on Foresight KDE and PC-BSD, "divorce" at Blastwave.org
  • Released last week: Musix GNU+Linux 1.0R2R5, CCux Linux 0.9.9
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 8.10 Alpha 4, Frugalware Linux 0.9 RC1
  • Donations: Linux Mint receives US$400.00
  • New distributions: Bubuntu, Elastix, GUFI, Medianix, Ojuba Linux, OzOs, Ryder Linux, Tin Hat, WorkBench Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Visions of a Microsoft-Free World

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Is free software taking over the world one town at a time? Residents of Felton, Calif., recently pledged to go proprietary-free for at least a week. Plans for similar events are reportedly under way in town in Oregon and New Mexico, as well as 100 towns in Italy.

The Right Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux

itweb.co.za: In a previous column, I asserted that Linux is ready to meet the demands of corporate desktops, while it is still some way off from being ready for mass use in the consumer environment. But, with that said, the obvious question that remains is: which distribution is right for your organisation?

Firefox Wins the “Who’s the Next Open Source Idol”

Filed under
Moz/FF

businesswire.com (PR): GroundWork Open Source, Inc. (www.groundworkopensource.com), announced today Mozilla’s Firefox was successful in beating out the other three contestants, reigning champion “Tux” the Linux kernel penguin, “Beastie” the BSD demon and the GNU “Gnu” to become the world’s favorite Open Source Idol.

It wasn’t supposed to be this easy

Filed under
Linux

scottnesbitt.net: A few weeks ago, our old printer gave up the ghost. I never used it much, but my wife did and immediately ordered a new HP multifunction from a well-known electronics chain. What attracted her to it was the price, and the printer’s wireless capabilities.

Review: Pardus Linux 2008

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Pardus is a rather interesting Linux distribution amongst a wide field of many competitors. It's unique in that, while it's designed for desktop usage, it is funded and developed by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Akademy in Belgium

  • Howto: Setup Encrypted ~/Private Directory On Intrepid
  • Ubuntu LaTeX; change fonts of xdvi preview
  • Richard Stallman lives and works by his principles
  • DimDim 4.0 is here
  • KDE 4.1 on OpenSuSE 11.0
  • Finding Compiz Shortcuts
  • Open Source Software Gaining Ground
  • Write Unicode characters with a Compose key
  • One year ago...Mark Shuttleworth on idealism
  • One year ago...The dignity of the developer
  • Linux Outlaws 50 - The Big Five-O

Canonical To VARs: 11% of U.S. Businesses Use Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: In an effort to rally solutions providers around Ubuntu Linux, Canonical is telling resellers that 11 percent of U.S. businesses already run Ubuntu. That’s impressive, but when will VARs truly jump on the Ubuntu bandwagon? Here are some clues from The VAR Guy.

Windows' days may be numbered

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworld.com: Some very interesting documents have been leaking out of Microsoft. They clearly indicate, believe it or not, that Microsoft is considering shifting its users from Windows to a new operating system: Midori.

Canonical’s Smartest Move of 2008

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: When Canonical canceled its Ubuntu Live conference — which had been scheduled to coincide with OSCON in Portland, Oregon — I was deeply disappointed. But in retrospect, here’s why canceling Ubuntu Live — and focusing more resources on August’s LinuxWorld Expo — was a very smart move by Canonical.

Some july-august Cooker news

Filed under
MDV

linux-wizard.net: After Mandriva 2009.0 Beta 1 release, here are some news on the Cooker front: Improving mdkapplet behaviour, Xmetisse and Xgl in contrib, and Refreshed installer UI landing in cooker.

18 CLI Audio Tools for Linux

Filed under
Linux

This article reviews all the most common command line tools for manipulating and listening to audio formats on Linux. Players, editors, encoders/decoders, tag editors, music servers, they are all here. Currently it includes no less than 18 CLI (Command Line Interface) tools.

Video Editing in Linux: Kino v Open Movie v KdenLive

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux.wordpress: I have yet to see a decent article on using video with Linux, so I thought I would write one. I’ve been working with video and posting my clips on YouTube using Windows Movie Maker 2. It is an adequate program, but I’d like to find something that could be as good or better in Linux. Could I pull it off? Follow along and see…

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More in Tux Machines

How Google Does Open Source

Marc Merlin has been working as an engineer at Google since 2002 and has seen (and done) a lot of open source and Linux work during that time. Speaking at the LinuxCon North America event this week, Merlin provided a standing room only audience with an overview how Google uses and contributes to open source. "Google wouldn't be around today without open source software," Merlin said. Read more

High-end music player has a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian inside

Bryston has launched a high-end, compact “BDP-π” digital music player built on a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, plus a HifiBerry “Digi+” audio HAT add-on. Bryston’s new Raspberry Pi-based BDP-π digital music player costs a hefty $1,295. Yet that’s less than half the cost of the highly acclaimed Bryston BDP-2 player, while offering many of these same features and much of the same high-end sound quality. The BDP-π is faster and more capable than the BDP-1, says the company. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.