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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Shuttleworth: Oracle a Litmus test for Linux, Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

internetnews.com: Ubuntu Linux 9.04 is set for release on April 23rd for both the server and the desktop, and though it will include many new features it will be lacking at least one key item -- Oracle certification.

Slicing and Dicing on the Command Line

Filed under
Linux

linux-mag.com: If you don’t know text, you don’t know Linux. There are a host of methods for reformatting plain text — including the text used by graphical applications like spreadsheets and email programs.

Can Open Source Songbird Compete with iTunes?

Filed under
Software

datamation.com: With the open source music player Songbird finally making its v1.0 debut this past December after two years in development, the big question swirling around Songbird continues to be whether or not this Mozilla-based player will be able to give iTunes a run for its money.

Death of Linux on netbooks greatly exaggerated

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

arstechnica.com: A Microsoft blogger says that the Windows operating system has achieved dominance in the netbook market. The statistics, however, are less definitive.

Can GNOME Regain the Evolutionary Advantage over KDE?

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: The Internet has a habit of making anything you say obsolete as soon as you say it. No sooner had I compared the future of the GNOME and KDE desktops than GNOME announced that a version 3.0 would be released after all.

The five best, new things in Ubuntu Linux 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.computerworld: I've been using Jaunty Jackalope--what a name!--for the last few weeks, and I upgraded to the release candidate last night the hard way, i.e. from the source code. I'm impressed.

fewer magical appearances

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: When desktop effects are enabled, extenders "roll up" and "roll back out" instead of just suddenly appearing and disappearing. This goes along with the idea of "organic interfaces" where things shouldn't exhibit magical behaviors:

Exciting changes in the 2.6.30 Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

hightechsorcery.com: Every Linux kernel release has interesting changes but 2.6.30 really stands out to me as having a lot of features I would like to take advantage.

Does a court ruling raise the risks of open source?

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: The model train business isn't exactly the font of software innovation. But a lawsuit over the rights to a hobbyist's code could be a huge boost for developers of open source programs. It could also make some businesses think again about using open source software.

Ubuntu Tech Support: It's All A Matter Of Timing

Filed under
Ubuntu

bmighty.com: The next Ubuntu Linux server release is on its way. If your company decides to give it a try, be sure that you also understand some important points about how Ubuntu handles long-term tech support.

10 (Latest) Beautiful Plasma Themes for KDE 4 Desktop

Filed under
KDE

junauza.com: Since a lot of you loved our collection of some of the most beautiful Plasma Themes for KDE 4 desktop, we decided to give you more. This time, we compiled the very latest.

GNOME 2.26.1 Fixes Various Bugs

Filed under
Software

softpedia.com: Almost one month after the big 2.26 release, the popular GNOME desktop environment reached version 2.26.1 yesterday, April 15th. Though changes were made in all areas, including development tools, mobile or platform, the desktop received the highest amount of attention.

In a Desert, TV-Browser is an EPG Oasis

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: It is not often that you fail to find half a dozen free software programs to fill a particular niche -browsers, e-mail clients or file managers to name a few; so it was with both surprise and disappointment that I nearly drew a blank in my search for an Electronic Programme Guide (EPG) for GNU/Linux.

Ext3 ‘data=guarded’ mode coming for Linux kernel 2.6.30?

Filed under
Linux

rajeeshknambiar.wordpress: In the light of recent “Ext3 fsync” problem related discussions happened in the Linux Kernel mailing list involving many experts in the field, there has been quite a few improvements.

ATI vs. NVIDIA on Linux - the showdown

Filed under
Hardware

hexus.net: Jo Shields, Manager of the Oxford Supercomputing Centre, lays ATI and NVIDIA hardware on the line, evaluating which perform best under Linux.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • CMus Review - A Great ncurses Music Player

  • PC, Server Makers Prepare for Canonical’s Ubuntu 9.04 Launch
  • Python 2.6.2 released
  • KDE 4.2.2 from openSUSE Factory…
  • Here comes the Jackalope
  • Linux Works Even When Your PC is Committing Suicide
  • WallChanger: Finally for Intrepid and Jaunty
  • Alcatel-Lucent Networking Embraces Linux, NAC
  • Linux Netbooks And Their Stumbling Blocks
  • Linux Outlaws 87 - Broadcasting Uranus
  • IN DEPTH: VirtualBox 2.2.0, the free Virtualizer
  • Tuxradar Podcast Season 1 Episode 6
  • Windows 7 distrust spurs Ubuntu for the desktop
  • How Will Novell and Canonical Answer the Open Source Channel Alliance?
  • You have work to do? Well so do I
  • UK lags in open source in the enterprise
  • Does A Greedy Intel Driver Improve Performance?
  • An interview with Codename
  • PulseAudio with Bluetooth support
  • Optimize Slow Solid State Drives
  • Why do Linux games cost what they cost?
  • All right Mr. Penguin, I’m ready for my close-up
  • Roku—Breaking the Linux Not Invited Rule

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Skype settings for Ubuntu 9.04

  • Secure File Transfer in Nautilus with SFTP
  • How to redirect traffic to another machine in Linux
  • Customizing Drupal 6 Interface
  • Running KDE4 with KWin/Plasma compositing effects on 2133
  • Installing SELinux on Debian/Lenny
  • Virtualbox
  • Beginner's Shell Scripting: How & Why
  • Backup all files in directory
  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 3
  • 4 Ways to Help Out Your Local Mirror
  • nvidia tv out in Debian
  • More Job Control
  • How to Detect and Prevent Psyb0t, the Linux Router Worm

Desperately Seeking Mediocrity

Filed under
Linux

apebox.org: One thing I’ve noticed out there in the big wide Internet is the number of people who desperately want GNU/Linux to suck. These are not, as you’d imagine, Windows or Mac OS fanatics who want to see the competition fail - in fact, quite the opposite.

More lightweight diversions

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I have spent the past few days poking around the Internet, looking for console-based diversions. I have little to report that isn’t common knowledge, really. On the other hand, there are some very good games that don’t require as much thought.

Linux table radio does Pandora

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Livio has announced a Linux-based Internet "radio" that plays back customized streams from Pandora, as well as approximately 11,000 other stations. The "Livio Radio" includes 802.11 wireless networking, an RJ45 port for wired Ethernet, plus "thumbs-up" and "thumbs-down" controls for rating songs.

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Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more