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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Who is Linux, really?

Filed under
Linux

locutus.us: On the face of it the answer to that question is quite simple. Who is Linux? Why it is Linus Torvalds, the inventer of the Linux kernel, or is it? Mabye some will say that Linux is Richard Stallman who is the instrumental in Open Source software. Others may even say that it is Mark Shuttleworth. So who is it then? Who is Linux?

Kubuntu Lucid Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxexperimentation.blogspot: I am an early adopter of KDE 4 and I welcome the radical changes it has made from earlier versions. Kubuntu seemed to be the winning choice because I have seen early KDE 4.4 reviews state that Kubuntu was the easiest and less buggy path to 4.4. In this article, I will be reviewing both Kubuntu Lucid Lynx the new KDE SC 4.4.

What is freedom anyway?

Filed under
Ubuntu

open.knome.fi: Today I’d like to ponder what freedom means for me and how I feel it actualizing. The Ubuntu community is definitely not the worst there is. However, there is lots of room for improvement. I’ve always felt that the Ubuntu community lacks communication.

Whither Linux drivers?

techgoondu.com: Linux users are often at the mercy of hardware vendors when it comes to device drivers. The open source community often needs to turn to reverse engineering to churn out drivers from proprietary ones.

The State of The X.Org Foundation 2010

phoronix.com: Along with announcing the X.Org Foundation board of director results, Bart Massey also issued the 2010 State of the X.Org Foundation report.

Network Analysis With Wireshark On Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Wireshark is a network protocol analyzer (or "packet sniffer") that can be used for network analysis, troubleshooting, software development, education, etc. This guide shows how to install and use it on an Ubuntu 9.10 desktop to analyze the traffic on the local network card.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • U1 Music Store – Store Music in U1?
  • the limits of virtual desktops
  • Gloobus is a sexy file previewer for your Gnome desktop
  • Debian Installer
  • Post-beta Opera fixes
  • Element OS- Your ultimate entertainment Linux OS
  • Debian & Ubuntu on my Acer Aspire One D150
  • Findwild
  • Midori 0.2.3 Released
  • Rekonq to replace konqi - On the menubar
  • SCALE 8x - Wish you were here

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fix DSL pppoe connection problem with Network Manager in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Getting started with KDE development on openSUSE
  • Installing Linux Kernel Source
  • SHMMAX share Linux memory
  • Quick note to users installing ~arch KDE4 in Gentoo
  • ImageMagick: add text to many images
  • Move File Starting With A Dash

Happy Birthday BBS

Filed under
Web

tech.nocr.at: Just a few days ago, Feb 16 to be exact, in 1978 Ward Christensen and Randy Suess launched the first ever Bulletin Board System in Chicago.

Little Things That Matter: Ubuntu 10.04's MessagingMenu

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Although people look for the big show-stopping killer-improvements when a new release of Ubuntu rolls around I find that it can be the small things which make the biggest difference.

The World Is Mourning The Loss Of Bruno Knaapen – Linux Advocate

Filed under
Obits

lockergnome.com: I joined Scot’s Newsletter Forum back in April, 2003 and took advantage of one of the forum’s Linux advocates. We knew him simply as Bruno, a man who knew Linux, and who had the patience to deal with us newbie’s who hounded him for advice.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 111 is out

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #111 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out.

Life with Linux: Adapting to the smaller screen on a netbook

sutor.com: This last week my son and I were on vacation and I took along a Simmtronics 10.2 netbook running Ubuntu Linux 9.10 Remix so I could have reasonable access to the Internet. Here are some observations about getting the most of that smaller screen while running the Ubuntu desktop.

From OS X to Ubuntu: 2 Years Later

Filed under
Ubuntu

starryhope.com: A little more than 2 years ago, I made a switch away from Mac OS X to Ubuntu Linux. Since then, I have used Ubuntu Linux about 98% of the time on my personal and work computers.

Linux Training Week: Customisation

Filed under
Linux

zath.co.uk: One of the great things about any Linux distribution is the ability to customise the look and feel of it to your taste. Throughout the past week, I’ve discussed software availability, compatibility and ease of use, but I haven’t gone as far as modifying the way I use it.

The state of (high definition) video editing on Linux

Filed under
Software

blog.thesilentnumber.me: We have extremely promising open source media editing applications for Linux like the Jokosher audio editor and PiTiVi video editor, both built on the powerful GStreamer framework. While things may be looking up, one shortcoming is an ever increasing problem that deserves some more serious attention.

Open Source? Who cares!

Filed under
OSS

maximumpc.com: Does open-source really matter? Think about it for a second. Do you care if your programs are open-source? Do you care if companies whose services you frequent are built around open-source technology or not?

Linux frustrates!

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I have heard of my geeky friends talking about this Linux stuff. I wasn't sure what it was so I asked them about it. Honestly, I thought they were trying to sell me some religion the way they jumped all over me trying to explain what Linux is. They did make some very good points though. So I decided to give it a try.

Dear Matt Asay,

Filed under
Ubuntu

theopensourcerer.com: It is great that you are now COO of the worlds leading Free Software company. We look forward to Canonical growing and changing over the next few years. Here are some ideas:

7 reasons to play retro titles – Puppy Arcade 7 is released

Filed under
Gaming

openbytes.wordpress: I have spoken with the creator (Scott Jarvis) and one of the most impressive things about this distro (other than its excellent) is the enthusiasm and genuine love Scott has for emulation and people enjoying old classics on hardware that may have been otherwise written off as an “old PC”.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.