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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Plasma 5.1 Brings Back Many Popular Features Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 12:48pm
Story Linus Torvalds' Best Quotes from LinuxCon Europe 2014 Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 12:38pm
Story Government Evangelist at GitHub on US open technologies Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 11:42am
Story New Paper Available Today: State of KVM Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 10:24am
Story Linux clusters in German finance ministry data centre Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 9:42am
Story Brackets : Free and Open Source Editor for Web Designers by Adobe Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 9:33am
Story OpenDaylight Helium gets out of the gate Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 9:08am
Story Ubuntu Touch Fully Forks Its Email Client Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 8:47am
Story Canonical Details Plans for Unity 8 Integration in Ubuntu Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 8:34am
Story GNOME's Mutter Gets Native Monitor Hot-Plugging Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 7:55am

News Of Solaris's Death Is Greatly Exaggerated

Filed under
OS

informationweek.com: Sun's got a long, hard road ahead of it as a new sibling in the Oracle family, but I'm not inclined to believe the recent doomsaying that Solaris, or OpenSolaris, is about to be kicked out of the house. If that happens, it won't be for years yet, if at all.

some odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • MontaVista Embedded Linux achieves 1 second boot

  • Lawyers shine light on real cloud concerns
  • Ubuntu 9.04's Java certified compatible
  • Ubuntu on Pilot Light: wattOS Beta 3
  • PC makers don't seem crazy about Chrome
  • Setting up a dynamic DNS service part 1: named

New FireFox burns the competition

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Tech Review: New FireFox burns the competition

  • First Zero Day Exploit for Firefox 3.5
  • Slow Firefox 3.5 start up time
  • about:mozilla 7/14
  • Firefox plugin woes

some early howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Unleash The Power of the Find Command

  • Downgrading A Ubuntu Package
  • Regular expressions, by example
  • Turn Ordinary Webcam into a Security Spy Camera on Ubuntu Linux
  • 6 Bash Productivity Tips
  • Breaking PostgreSQL Upgrading Ubuntu
  • HOWTO: Resolving XOrg’s X server startup error messages in Debian
  • Howto Add a User to Sudoers List On Ubuntu

Win a subscription to Linux Format magazine

tuxradar.com: In Episode 12 of our podcast, Mike sang the Free Software song. If you want the chance to win a free subscription to Linux Format magazine read on...

I Fear Microsoft Geeks Bearing Gifts...

Filed under
Microsoft

opendotdotdot.blogspot: Look, those nice people at Microsoft Research are saving science from its data deluge-> Project Trident: A Scientific Workflow Workbench allows scientists to easily work with large volumes of data. Basically Project Trident is more Project Trojan Horse.

Monomania affecting Ubuntu users far and wide?

theopensourcerer.com: Last night in bed I was reading some more of a novel (Not Novell) called “The suspicions of Mr Whicher“. About 1/2 way through the book I discovered something amazing. A reference to a psychological condition called: Monomania How on earth could a 19th century detective know about the trojan horse for our most [ahem] loved convicted monopolist?

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Lenny

Filed under
HowTos

This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Lenny. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content.

Open source software law review goes live

Filed under
Web

computerworld.com.au: A new legal journal covering analysis and commentary of free and open source software (FOSS) issues has launched today.

GNOME-Colors: Consistence and Elegance For GNOME Desktops

Filed under
Software

linuxologist.com: Lets face it, the default GNOME desktop isn’t the easiest desktop on the eye. While Ubuntu’s desert brown is actually an eye sore, other distros like Mint and Fedora have done better jobs in theming their desktops. Enter GNOME-Colors

Linux Mint 7 Review

Filed under
Linux

brighthub.com: Linux Mint 7 is the latest incarnation of the Ubuntu based distribution. Read on to find out why it might just displace Windows as my primary OS.

today's odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Software and Games for linuxMint by just a click

  • Quick thoughts on the (possible) demise of OpenSolaris
  • Red Hat ups its support for system integrators
  • Publishers Are Switching to Drupal, Cost Savings Reported
  • Thoughts on the Google Chrome OS
  • Backlash: feminism considered harmful
  • LPC: Kernel/Userspace/User Interfaces Microconference
  • Seven complaints about Linux and why Windows users make them
  • Fedora having update problems
  • 2008-2009 Annual Report on China's Open-Source Software Market
  • Office 2010 Looks Like More Bloat to Me
  • The mess that libass is
  • MontaVista Toasts 10 Years in the Embedded Linux Business
  • 0 A.D. development moves to open source
  • Gran Canaria Desktop Summit 2009 – The Nepomuk Perspective
  • BBC Teams with Tim Berners-Lee on "Open Source" Documentary

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • DirectX in VirtualBox 3.0.0 - Pure joy is here

  • Set Bandwidth Limit in Debian
  • How to Layout a Book with OpenOffice.org: Part 1
  • Iceweasel 3.5 on Debian Lenny
  • Be a Sudoer
  • How to make PulseAudio run once at boot for all your users
  • Five ways to help secure Apache on Linux
  • Creating Keyboard Shortcuts in OpenOffice
  • Change the color of your Linux prompt
  • Globe Tattoo On Ubuntu Jaunty 9.04
  • How to get virtual surround sound on your headphones
  • nvidia, kernel 2.6.31 and gentoo
  • Getting System Information (OpenSuSe) - phpSysInfo
  • suspend to disk with encrypted root file system on lvm
  • MySQL Performance from the Start
  • Quick Log File Processing with Perl

Btrfs v0.19 Brings Some Gains, Some Losses

phoronix.com: Since we began benchmarking Btrfs a few months ago we have found it to not deliver any spectacular file-system performance results on Linux. Committed to the Linux 2.6.31 kernel was Btrfs v0.19. Does this release bring any performance improvements? Yes and no.

Amarok 2.1 Review

Filed under
Software

osrevolution.com: With the tagline “Let there be light” the all new Amarok 2.1 release seems to be another step closer to make the popular music player the world’s best.

How Does Ubuntu 9.04 Measure Up to Mac OS X?

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-mag.com: Bypassing Windows altogether, Mark Shuttleworth has stated that OS X is the operating system to beat. With Ubuntu’s 9.04 now in wide distribution, we look at how it stacks up with the competition.

US State Dept. workers beg Clinton for Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: US State Department workers have begged Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to let them use Firefox.

Google Chrome Browser Exhibits Risky Behavior

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com: Even Google Chrome, touted for its security architecture, has security issues. According to one security expert, there are no secure browsers.

What I don't like about KDE4

Filed under
KDE

toolbox.com/blogs: The gauntlet has been thrown. After an unexpected interest and response from my last article where I said goodbye to KDE I was informed that I had not specifically stated why I don't like KDE any more.

Elive 1.9.35 (Unstable)

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Elive is based on Debian and uses the Enlightenment window manager rather than KDE or Gnome. The version I picked for this review is the 1.9.35 release which is currently labeled as unstable.

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.