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Wednesday, 28 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Sword Of The Stars: The Pit & Ground Pounders Soon To Arrive On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 8:26pm
Story Mozilla Calls for Help in Delivering Firefox OS Tablets Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 7:59pm
Story Women in Open Source Week Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Research Shows Chromebooks Doing Very Well in the Education Market Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 7:48pm
Story 3 Reasons Why Ubuntu Smartphone Will Succeed Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 5:23pm
Story Raspberry Pi: Extending the life of the SD card Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 5:18pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 3:56pm
Story Quirky Linux Gets More Pep Out of Puppy Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 12:03pm
Story Kali Linux 1.0.6, hands-on Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 12:02pm
Story Rifles powered by Linux purchased by US Army Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 8:55am

Sapphire Radeon HD 4670 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Earlier this month the ATI Radeon HD 4600 series from AMD was unveiled as the new mid-range graphics cards derived from their flagship RV770 graphics core. The Radeon HD 4650 and Radeon HD 4670 are the two RV730-based products now available. The ATI Radeon HD 4670 may not be able to compete with the Radeon HD 4800 series in all of the tests, but at a price of under $100 USD is it worth pursuing?

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Pidgin NoSound Solution

  • Emergency Booting RedHat Linux With USB
  • Finding log files X number of days old and deleteing them
  • How to add KDE to Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1
  • Fwknopping your way to success with Single Packet Authorisation

A new version of AmigaOS

Filed under
OS

arstechnica.com: From its very inception, the Amiga has been about defying conventional wisdom. Sadly, these days the Amiga is no longer breaking new ground technologically. However, the platform continues to defy conventional wisdom.

Gentoo: New release strategy to provide more current install media

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org: In future releases, Gentoo will focus on a more back-to-basics approach that will give you up-to-date install media on a regular basis and make much better use of our human resources. Consequently, we're canceling the 2008.1 release.

Wubi Tuesday

Filed under
Ubuntu

itpro.co.uk/blogs: I have a sneaking feeling that after having done all that back in the days of the 0.8 kernel and with more than a handful of Gentoo installs, I really should I be feeling a little guilty as to just how easy it was to get a dual-boot Linux install working on my main desktop PC.

Few tips for selecting the best Linux apps

Filed under
Software

cyberciti.biz: GNU/Linux and open source software offers lots of choices to end users. This can create a problem for new users. Most Linux distributions provide a program for browsing a list of thousands of free software applications that have already been tested.

Umit, the graphical network scanner

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: Umit is a user-friendly graphical interface to Nmap that lets you perform network port scanning. The utility's most useful features are its stored scan profiles and the ability to search and compare saved network scans.

Get some attitude for aptitude

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Many times when looking around the internet for the rare program that is not in the repository. Or even if you want a newer version of a program that is in the repository. You will find that some sites have pre-prepared binary packages which can be downloaded and installed.

Viewing the Night Sky with Linux, Part III: Stellarium and Celestia

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Parts I and II of this series covered covered the "planetarium" programs KStars and XEphem. They can answer pretty much any question about what's where and when in the night sky. But they don't really give you the feeling of being there like a couple of newer entries on the Linux astronomy scene: Stellarium and Celestia.

CME Group joins Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

finextra.com: Derivatives exchange operator CME Group has joined the Linux Foundation, with its associate director Vinod Kutty taking on the chair of the organisation's end user council.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Eee PC: Xandros Vs Eee-ubuntu

  • Gentoo: Improve boot time…
  • Microsoft, Mozilla, Google Talk Browser Futures
  • IBM Lotus Symphony: The Ubuntu Beta
  • The command line is nothing to be afraid of
  • 13 Terminal Emulators for Linux
  • VirtualBox update brings improved performance and 64-bit support
  • Linux Foundation courts individual members
  • Year One with the Linux Based NAS Server
  • KDE 4 drawing performance on nvidia
  • Linux Plumbers Conf: Linus - Git Tutorial
  • Just switched to the Paludis package manager
  • linux-0.01 on Ubuntu
  • OpenSUSE 11 First Impressions
  • Fraught laptop project takes aim at digital divide and poverty
  • ReiserFS File System Corruption and Linux Recovery
  • Linux Outlaws 56 - Have You Had Your Eyes Tested Lately?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reset Your Forgotten Ubuntu Password in 2 Minutes or Less

  • Installing Real Player and Configuring Mozilla Plugin
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 2
  • Basic APT commands
  • Install VirtualBox 2 Guest Additions in Ubuntu
  • Charting your boot processes with bootchart
  • How To: Increase Battery Life in Ubuntu or Debian Linux
  • Running CrossOver Chromium aka "Google Chrome" under Ubuntu
  • Changing what time a process thinks it is with libfaketime

OS stuff (opensuse, ubuntu, windows)

Filed under
OS
  • openSUSE Build Service built openSUSE 11.1 beta 1

  • openSUSE 11.1 beta 1 e1000e driver issue
  • Short Blog on openSUSE
  • What’s Red Hat Doing in the Virtualization Business?
  • Oops! Ubuntu IS gearing up for more kernel contribution

  • Ubuntu loses its virginity, turns commercial
  • Widening Canonical's Commercial Software Pipeline
  • Ubuntu Ibex Alpha 6 Review
  • More Windows 7 M3 Screenshots Leaked

  • Microsoft refers to its anti-Linux playbook to attack VMware
  • Windows 7 versus Generic Linux Distro

Open Source Headlines

  • Open Source makes historic UK breakthrough

  • Open source company wins Becta accreditation (PR)
  • Stanford and Harvard teach businesses how to squash open source
  • Is "open source" a matter of license or employment?
  • Open-source founders doubling up on startups
  • Consolidation and open source: Not likely anytime soon
  • Open source and the box era
  • How big the Google open source credibility gap
  • Google throws down open source gauntlet
  • Two Views of Enterprise Open Source
  • Let's talk cheap software
  • Attorney Shaalu Mehra discusses emerging GPL trends (video)

"what about Canonical's work on the desktop?"

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: One main question that I saw a lot, and was even asked about during my talk, was "what about Canonical's work on the desktop/Gnome/KDE"? I really don't know if they have contributed a lot of effort back upstream on these projects, that wasn't my point here.

How2 ... join the Linux movement

Filed under
Linux

stuff.co.nz: The Linux movement has taken off and Dave Thompson goes undercover to find out how to join. Every week we get someone asking about Linux what is it, why is it and should I do it? The answer is complicated.

Ohio LinuxFest 2008 Preview

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: The Greater Columbus Convention Center will host this year's annual Ohio LinuxFest, which will take place on October 10-11. Now at its sixth edition, the Ohio LinuxFest will include a large expo and popular speakers, while welcoming free software developers, open source enthusiasts and virtually anyone who is interested.

One Desktop Per Ten A Workable Model

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: The Digital Divide -- there isn't a nation where it doesn't exist, yet it seems so relative. In one place, a child going online via dial up using a PII seems at a disadvantage. Elsewhere, that child has a tool that could change his life. Open source has much to offer here.

How Linux lost the battle for your desktop

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: A few years ago, it looked like Linux might – just might – take over the world. Companies like Lindows/Linspire were going to make it easy enough for your mother to use. Bright coloured boxes of SUSE and Red Hat and plenty of others were piled high in every computer store. It was going to be a whole new era. Except it didn't really happen, did it?

What’s GNU, Part Four: find

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: A few months ago, we finished the third of a series about features added to longstanding utility programs. This month we’ll look at the new features that GNU programmers and others have added to all of the other features that find(1) already had.

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More in Tux Machines

Networking and Security

  • FAQ: What's so special about 802.11ad Wi-Fi?
    Here are the broad strokes about 802.11ad, the wireless technology that’s just starting to hit the market.
  • 2.5 and 5 Gigabit Ethernet Now Official Standards
    In 2014, multiple groups started efforts to create new mid-tier Ethernet speeds with the NBASE-T Alliance starting in October 2014 and MGBASE-T Alliance getting started a few months later in December 2014. While those groups started out on different paths, the final 802.3bz standard represents a unified protocol that is interoperable across multiple vendors. The promise of 2.5 and 5 Gbps Ethernet is that they can work over existing Cat5 cabling, which to date has only been able to support 1 Gbps. Now with the 802.3bz standard, organizations do not need to rip and replace cabling to get Ethernet that is up to five times faster. "Now, the 1000BASE-T uplink from the wireless to wired network is no longer sufficient, and users are searching for ways to tap into higher data rates without having to overhaul the 70 billion meters of Cat5e / Cat6 wiring already sold," David Chalupsky, board of directors of the Ethernet Alliance and Intel principal engineer, said in a statement. "IEEE 802.3bz is an elegant solution that not only addresses the demand for faster access to rapidly rising data volumes, but also capitalizes on previous infrastructure investments, thereby extending their life and maximizing value."
  • A quick fix for stupid password reset questions
    It didn’t take 500 million hacked Yahoo accounts to make me hate, hate, hate password reset questions (otherwise known as knowledge-based authentication or KBA). It didn't help when I heard that password reset questions and answers -- which are often identical, required, and reused on other websites -- were compromised in that massive hack, too. Is there any security person or respected security guidance that likes them? They are so last century. What is your mother’s maiden name? What is your favorite color? What was your first pet’s name?
  • French hosting provider hit by DDoS close to 1TBps
    A hosting provider in France has been hit by a distributed denial of service attack that went close to one terabyte per second. Concurrent attacks against OVH clocked in at 990GBps. The attack vector is said to be the same Internet-of-Things botnet of 152,464 devices that brought down the website of security expert Brian Krebs. OVH chief technology officer Octave Klaba tweeted that the network was capable of attacks up to 1.5TBps.
  • Latest IoT DDoS Attack Dwarfs Krebs Takedown At Nearly 1Tbps Driven By 150K Devices
    If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these types devices' network settings are improperly configured, which leaves them ripe for the picking for hackers that would love to use them to carry our destructive attacks.

Android Leftovers

  • Goodbye QWERTY: BlackBerry stops making hardware
    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has been hinting at this move for almost a year now: today BlackBerry announced it will no longer design hardware. Say goodbye to all the crazy hardware QWERTY devices, ultra-wide phones, and unique slider designs. Speaking to investors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen described the move as a "pivot to software," saying, "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners. This allows us to reduce capital requirements and enhance return on invested capital." The "Outsourcing to partners" plan is something we've already seen with the "BlackBerry" DTEK50, which was just a rebranded Alcatel Idol 4. Chen is now betting the future of the company on software, saying, "In Q2, we more than doubled our software revenue year over year and delivered the highest gross margin in the company's history. We also completed initial shipments of BlackBerry Radar, an end-to-end asset tracking system, and signed a strategic licensing agreement to drive global growth in our BBM consumer business." BlackBerry never effectively responded to the 2007 launch of the iPhone and the resulting transition to modern touchscreen smartphones. BlackBerry took swings with devices like the BlackBerry Storm in 2008, its first touchscreen phone; and the BlackBerry Z10 in 2013, the first BlackBerry phone with an OS designed for touch, but neither caught on. BlackBerry's first viable competitor to the iPhone didn't arrive until it finally switched to Android in 2015 with the BlackBerry Priv. It was the first decent BlackBerry phone in some time, but the high price and subpar hardware led to poor sales.
  • Oracle's 'Gamechanger' Evidence Really Just Evidence Of Oracle Lawyers Failing To Read
    Then on to the main show: Oracle's claim that Google hid the plans to make Android apps work on Chrome OS. Google had revealed to Oracle its "App Runtime for Chrome" (ARC) setup, and it was discussed by Oracle's experts, but at Google I/O, Google revealed new plans for apps to run in Chrome OS that were not using ARC, but rather a brand new setup, which Google internally referred to as ARC++. Oracle argued that Google only revealed to them ARC, but not ARC++ and that was super relevant to the fair use argument, because it showed that Android was replacing more than just the mobile device market for Java. But, here's Oracle's big problem: Google had actually revealed to Oracle the plans for ARC++. It appears that Oracle's lawyers just missed that fact. Ouch.
  • Understanding Android's balance between openness and security
    At the 2016 Structure Security conference, Google's Adrian Ludwig talked about the balance between keeping Android as open as possible, while also keeping it secure.
  • Google's Nougat Android update hits the sweet spot: Software 'isn't flashy, but still pretty handy'
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week.
  • How to change the home screen launcher on Android
  • Andromeda: Chrome OS and Android will merge
  • Sale of Kodi 'fully-loaded' streaming boxes faces legal test
  • Android boxes: Middlesbrough man to be first to be prosecuted for selling streaming kits

Endless OS 3.0 is out!

So our latest and greatest Endless OS is out with the new 3.0 version series! The shiny new things include the use of Flatpak to manage the applications; a new app center (GNOME Software); a new icon set; a new Windows installer that gives you the possibility of installing Endless OS in dual-boot; and many bug fixes. Read more

Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6

VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications. These are said to include smart lockers, vending machines, information kiosks, and signage devices that run “intensive multimedia shopping, entertainment, and navigation applications.” The outdoors focus is supported with an extended -20 to 60°C operating range, as well as surge and ESD protection for surviving challenges such as a nearby lightning strike. Read more