Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Keep Dream of a Free and Open Internet Alive, Black Hat Keynoter Urges Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 11:33am
Story Korora 22 (Gnome3) Review: Works Right Out Of the Box & Includes Lots of Apps Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 11:29am
Story DebConf15, LibreOffice 5, and Linux Rules Web Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 11:24am
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 11:22am
Story LibreOffice 5.0: More Coverage Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 11:22am
Story India adopts a comprehensive open source policy Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 10:06am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 9:53am
Story Ubuntu Touch Devs Still Struggling After GCC 5 Transition, No Word on the OTA-5.5 Hotfix Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 9:26am
Story Enlightenment 0.19.8 Desktop Environment Adds More X11 Improvements, Bugfixes Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 9:25am
Story Red Hat prepares for the IoT revolution Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 9:23am

FreeBSD 8.1 uses different open source philosophy

Filed under
BSD

freebsdnews.net: FreeBSD may not receive the attention that Linux does, but its latest upgrade could provide some instruction to the makers of Ubuntu about how to do open source releases.

Unusual Trading Activity for Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu: Eight Long-term Reality Checks

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: It’s been roughly two-and-a-half years since Nine Lives Media Inc. launched WorksWithU. When we started this site we made a few assumptions about Ubuntu. How have those assumptions evolved from 2008 to 2010t?

11 Free Linux Apps Your Business Needs Now

Filed under
Software

networkworld.com: Despite the wealth of free applications out there, many small business owners continue to spend an inordinate amount of their all-too-scarce resources on software. The good news is that there are free and open-source alternatives for virtually every package a small business might need.

Three strikes with Ubuntu video editors

Filed under
Software

openattitude.com: I honestly thought that the hardest part of editing video on my Linux Mint computer would be capturing the video footage to my hard drive. Turns out I was wrong. Very wrong.

Not Having Linux Skills is IT Malpractice

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Some things seem so obvious I feel silly even saying them. And this is one of them: any IT staffer who only knows one operating system is not worth hiring.

10 differences between Linux and BSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

blogs.techrepublic.com: Despite a common tendency to gloss over the differences, Linux and BSD have a number of characteristics that set them apart from one another. Jack Wallen points out several important distinctions.

Unix How-To: Give Me That Old-Time Security!

Filed under
Security
HowTos

itworld.com: Even in the wild frontiers of today's Internet, good basic Unix system security provides extremely valuable protection against security breaches. In today's column, I'm going to rant about some basic security rules of thumb that every Unix sysadmin ought to consider.

Six open source projects you should be using

Filed under
Software
OSS

infoworld.com: The employees who do the actual work in IT can use all the help they can get; these open source tools are handier than most

August 2010 Issue of The PCLOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the August 2010 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. In this issue: Linux IS Ready For The Desktop, Video Encoding: Step-By-Step, and Screenshot Showcase.

KDE release day for 4.5.0 delayed

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Today an email from the release team was sent out notifying KDE developers and packagers that the release of the next KDE software compilation will be delayed by a week.

Red Hat vs. Ubuntu: Why upstream comitts matter

Filed under
Ubuntu

internetnews.com: If you need something fixed or done, then you make that contribution upstream. Doing everything upstream is the only way that Linux will remain un-fragmented. Without upstream there is no Linux community.

LiMo rumoured set for recall to Linux mothership

Filed under
Linux
  • LiMo rumoured set for recall to Linux mothership
  • LiMo frustrated, may have to merge with Linux Foundation

CIA Software Developer Goes Open Source, Instead

Filed under
Software

wired.com: For three years, Matthew Burton has been trying to get a simple, useful software tool into the hands of analysts at the Central Intelligence Agency. So now, Burton’s releasing it — free to the public, and under an open source license.

Preview of KDE 4.5

Filed under
KDE

maketecheasier.com: Just as KDE 3.5 was intended to be a stabilizing, long-term release, the primary goal of KDE 4.5 is to fix outstanding bugs and increase stability. Users will not be blown away by the new features, but there are a few worth noting.

Marave - Distraction Free Writing

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: The never-ceasing distractions of tweets, pokes on Facebook, Gmail spam & match.com matches to review are all enemies of writing. Was there ever an activity assailed by the vampires of impetuosity as much as writing?

Remember those birthdays with GBirthday

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Since today is the birthday of both myself and the US President I thought it apropos to cover a birthday reminder tool for the Linux operating system.

GNOME Do Launcher Starts Apps on the Right Foot

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: GNOME Do is an app launcher, program switcher and file-searching tool wrapped into one really cool interface. Depending on what options you select, it can do even more.

shuttleworth: Making room in the sound indicator

Filed under
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: In Maverick we’re adding the new Ayatana indicator for sound, Conor Curran’s very classy implementation of MPT’s very classy spec. It’s a Category Indicator, like the messaging menu, so it allows apps to embed themselves into it in a standard and appropriate way.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Best Download manager for Linux
  • Mandriva2010 Spring.. a fresh minty breeze again…..
  • Flattr: A Social Micropayment Platform for Financing Free Works
  • Supporting GNOME by buying music via Banshee
  • Hacking is easy...
  • What's wrong with Firefox?
  • Main frozen for Maverick Alpha-3
  • Weaknet Linux – Penetration Testing & Forensic Analysis
  • DebConf 10: Day 2
  • DTrace co-creator quits Sun, hits delete on Oracle
  • More GPL Enforcement Progress
  • Linux skills more in demand than Unix for the first time
  • Chronic Logic releases Gish version 1.6 for Win, OSX and Linux (PR)
  • Australia to Host Global Open Source Leaders
  • Red Hat gets bump as markets rise
  • Drupal has a two-prong enterprise strategy
  • Can open business practices survive an acquisition?
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Purism's Linux Phone to Use Convergence for a Unified Experience Across Devices

For Purism, the company that sells quality computers using a Linux-based operating system and are intended to protect user's privacy and freedom, designing a convergent Linux phone is a long-term goal to unify the mobile experience across various devices. Purism's François Téchené shares some initial details on how the company plans to use convergence for their short and long-term design goals of Librem 5, the Linux smartphone that raised more than $2 million on Kickstarter last year, saying they're looking to unify the human experience across different device you might own. Read more

Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts
    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.
  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications
    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations. What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.
  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge
    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.
  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released
    Based on Slackware64-current Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers :-)
  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Security: Updates, Nintendo 'Hackers', Microsoft Windows Back Doors, and FlightSimLabs Malware

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Hackers Release Video Of Nintendo Switch Running A Linux Distro
    When it comes to porting software to potentially unsupported devices, hackers are quite comfortable to push themselves beyond the boundaries set by the manufactures.
  • Epidemic of cryptojacking can be traced to escaped NSA superweapon [Ed: It's a Microsoft Windows issue. All versions of Windows (ME onwards) have NSA back doors]
    It all started when the Shadow Brokers dumped a collection of NSA cyberweapons that the NSA had fashioned from unreported bugs in commonly used software, including versions of Windows. The NSA discovered these bugs and then hoarded them, rather than warning the public and/or the manufacturers about them, in order to develop weapons that turned these bugs into attacks that could be used against the NSA's enemies.
  • Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

    Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.

Software and Games Leftovers

  • LXD Weekly Status #35
    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while. We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week. On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.
  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released
    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!
  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade
    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.
  •  
  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience
    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.
  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price
    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.
  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th
    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.