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Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fedora 10's Plymouth Might Prevent Boot

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: There’s a new feature coming in Fedora 10 that is going to be very apparent to users trying the F10 Beta as their first introduction to the release. Plymouth uses X modesetting to drop the aging rhgb graphical boot engine in favor of a sleeker, faster system. However, the feature doesn’t work seamlessly for every video chipset.

The First Three Netbooks To Consider

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxloop.com: Wading through the numerous netbooks available today can be challenging, so you might want to at least start with this list of the first three netbooks to consider.

Review: KLibido Newsreader 0.2.5

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: One of the things I've been forever in search of on Linux is a good newsreader, especially for binaries, since I frequently find that the various files I'm after (patches and distro ISO files mostly) are available only on Usenet.

Linux Promotion in Mall Kiosks

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb: I have been attending Linux install festivals for years. Always fun, often educational and (in some cases) completely missing the mark of their potential for the people they interact with. There is so much more these same knowledgeable individuals could be doing with the general public.

Firefox 3.0.2 coming next week minus EULA

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.internetnews.com: Firefox 3.0.2 and 2.0.0.17 releases have been pushed back by a week according to Mozilla's Mike Beltzner, with the EULA issue being one of three additional bugs that have been fixed.

Hard core Linux developers discuss the future of Linux at the Kernel Summit

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Linus Torvalds, Andrew Morton and eighty other important kernel developers are now debating how they plan to proceed with the future development of Linux at the Kernel Summit 2008 in Portland, Oregon.

Compiz 0.7.8 Arrives With New Plug-In

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Back in May we had the release of Compiz 0.7.6 with rewritten plug-ins and other changes to boost the vitality of this popular compositing manager. Since then all activity on the Compiz front has been relatively quiet, until this morning. Danny Baumann has announced the release of Compiz 0.7.8.

My display

A comparative look at compact sysadmin distributions

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Things go wrong. Hard disks fail and whole servers crash. Luckily, many Linux-based distributions are available to help systems administrators handle minor catastrophes. We looked at four of the most portable, all of which fit on a 210MB mini CD -- SliTaz, Parted Magic, GParted, and RIPLinuX.

Shuttleworth man heads to Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

tectonic.co.za: The Shuttleworth Foundation’s open philanthropy fellow, Mark Surman, will be moving to the Mozilla Foundation where he has been appointed executive director and will continue his work in open sourcing philanthropy.

GIMP 2.5.4 Development Release

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP approaches the next stable release and only a handful bugs are left to be fixed before GIMP 2.6 is ready.

5 best-practices of a successful Linux user

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: There would have been one or more reasons which would have tempted each one of us to try Linux, and some of us just never looked back. Few would have probably turned out to be Linux professionals, while others would still be struggling with what’s good and what’s perfect.

I want to break free!

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Freeme2 is a program for stripping the DRM from commonly distributed music and sound files. More specifically it strips it from windows sound files of the format wmv, wma and asf. It also can do the same from video and audio streams.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Can Ubuntu Overcome The Status Quo?

  • Microsoft hails open source outreach
  • Found: The World’s Hottest Ubuntu Linux Deployment
  • Review: Star Wars: The Force Unleashed
  • OLPC rivals get 'vicious'
  • The Road to Geekdom
  • How to uninstall application in ubuntu cleanly
  • Grep: RRTFM
  • Tux3 Report: What next?
  • BECTA Back in Play
  • Shuttleworth urges calm in Firefox/Ubuntu flap
  • Change Boot-up options in Ubuntu

Firefox without EULAs — Update

Filed under
Software

Mitchell Baker: We’re still working on this. There’s been a bunch of helpful feedback. We appreciate this. We think we’ve integrated the feedback into something that’s a good solution; different from out last version in both its essence and its presentation and content.

Look Ma, No Terminal

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: A common misconception with Linux is that you have to know how to use the terminal in order for you to use linux. The fact is you won’t have to use the linux terminal more than you would use CMD in Windows or the terminal in Mac OSX.

Oldham, England Brings Open Source To Schools

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: It's good to see news about continuing adoption of open source software in schools around the world. The Linux-based lash-up they've chosen uses open source Squid cache and web proxy software along with MySQL and WebSense filtering and security software. MySQL was reportedly chosen because "it's free and simple to use."

My New Best Friend: Unetbootin

Filed under
Software

linuxcanuck.wordpress: I install lots of distros. Several each week. I am a self-confessed distro junky. I have a collection of ISOs that go back many years. In fact I have boxes of spools of full CDs and DVDs. Aside from the space and environmental concerns, it is an expensive and time consuming obsession. Now, I have a solution.

Tinest Linux system, yet?

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: CompuLab introduced a tiny fanless PC using 4-6 Watts of power. The Linux-ready "Fit-PC Slim" measures 4.3 x 3.9 x 1.2 inches (110 x 100 x 30mm), but includes a 500MHz AMD Geode LX800, Ethernet, VGA output, WiFi, and a 2.5-inch hard drive option, says CompuLab.

Video: The history of Fedora

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: Who is that masked man? It’s the Fedora Project’s Greg DeKoenigsberg. And who better to talk about this history of the Fedora than someone who has been involved nearly every step of the way…

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more