Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Easily Swap Between AMD & NVIDIA OpenGL Linux Drivers At Boot Time Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 9:47pm
Story The Mozilla We Want Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 9:35pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 9:32pm
Story Leftovers: KDE and Mint Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 9:29pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 9:27pm
Story Red Hat News Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 9:26pm
Story Linux Lite 2.6 Enters Beta with LibreOffice 5.0 and New Control Center, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.3 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 7:28pm
Story KDE Applications 15.08 RC for openSUSE Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 5:32pm
Story Zorin OS 10 Lite and Business Editions Now Available for Download - Screenshot Tour Roy Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 4:16pm
Story BQ’s Ubuntu smartphones now available globally Roy Schestowitz 08/08/2015 - 4:14pm

Lightspark Gains Faster Rendering, H263/MP3 Video

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Lightspark, one of the newest free software projects designed to provide an open-source implementation of Adobe's Flash/SWF specification, has been progressing at a rather expedited pace. Lightspark continues to pickup new features with each new release.

Debian Developers per country

Filed under
Linux

perrier.eu.org: Back in 2009, I did some analysis of the number of developers per country. Apparently, some people at DebConf remember this and asked if I could update this data. So, here we are with the 2010 version, sorted by the ratio of *active* developers per million population for each country.

Throwing down the gauntlet

Filed under
Linux
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: I’ve been covering Linux and open source since 1999 and using Linux exclusively since around 1996. During said time I have tried very hard to remain PC and let the criticism just roll off my back. I have said some things only to retract them and held back certain opinions out of fear I might offend.

Not this time.

OpenSUSE 11.3, the best binary KDE distribution or best KDE distribution?

Filed under
KDE
Gentoo
SUSE

linuxtweaking.blogspot: I have been using Gentoo for a few months and it has been a good experience but generally I can't see myself continuing to use it. Funnily enough, OpenSUSE 11.3 has changed some of my thoughts about Gentoo.

Top best free software

Filed under
Software

tech.blorge.com: There is a lot of free software available and much of it rivals the quality of software that you have to pay good money for. Here is a list, in no particular order, of some of the best software currently available for free.

Still more LXDE desktops

Filed under
Linux
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I keep running into LXDE derivatives. Not physically of course, but it could be an unintended side effect of being on the lookout for distros to try on the Mebius.

Linux is winning

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: Linux doesn't have a CEO. Consequently, there's no annual keynote hosted by a charismatic alpha male. But if it did, and if there were a conference covering the first half of this year, the first speech would start with three words: "Linux is winning".

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Great 5 Features In Tomboy Note Application
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Alpha 3 Review
  • maddog celebrates his 60th birthday
  • 'How do you use Linux' survey
  • StarDict Dictionary - the Real Star!
  • Kmart’s $150 Augen Tablet Uses “Unlicenced” Android
  • Banshee adds initial meerkat sound menu support
  • "A New Start" GTK Theme looks cool

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The Ultimate SSH Tricks Manual
  • Free Tux Avatars and Icons
  • Implementing Detailed User-Level Auditing
  • Enabling the Ctrl Alt Backspace combo in KDE 4
  • Advanced usage with gLabels: labels/cards
  • Let Cairo-Dock be your Linux desktop dock
  • Configuring goldfish autoresponder for Postfix

Some weekend compiz hacking

Filed under
Software

People kept asking me about minimized window thumbnails. I caved.

1. Patch for core
2. Patch for workarounds

Meet Alawalk - Possibly the Lightest Launcher Ever

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: Popular launcher applications Do and Kupfer may have some competition - say hello to the incredibly lightweight Alawalk.

4 Awesome RedHat Commercials You Need to See

Filed under
Linux

techdrivein.com: I was vaguely browsing through different Linux related videos in YouTube when I found out these incredible RedHat commercials. They are not just hard core RedHat commercials, they are more like advertisements for Free Software and Open Source in general.

"Is it a PC?" "Is it a Linux?"... "No its PCLinuxOS"

Filed under
PCLOS

mylifeinlinux.blogspot: Booting the live DVD initially didn’t work but the boot menu does give the option of a safe graphics mode also known as VESA. This got the ball rolling and a good looking Gnome desktop followed. Similar in looks to Mandriva but with a massive menu.

World's Funniest Tech-related Demotivational Posters

Filed under
Humor

junauza.com: Motivational posters are made to inspire us by making us achieve certain goals and change our way of thinking in a positive way. Demotivational poster is a parody. I hope this will somehow brighten up your day.

Rise of Linux Powered Devices

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Though linux still doesn't win consumer desktops sitting barely on 2% of the systems, it's surprisingly merging on the mobile devices, gadgets and various other small-form factor computers.

Crash statistics for KWin

Filed under
KDE

martin-graesslin.com: KWin is one of those parts of the KDE workspace which receives crash parts for all parts of the stack. As you should not trust any statistics you haven’t faked yourself, I used the search to set some more bugs to upstream, duplicate and so on.

Where would we be without open source software?

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: So that's it. No more open source software. It's gone, all of it. Now what state is the world in now? Obviously there would be no more Linux, BSD, Gimp, Open Office and the rest.

Ubuntu's vision for its Unity interface

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

techradar.com: What's got us really excited is that fact that the creator of the fantastic Gnome Do, David Siegel, is working with the design team. Naturally, we wanted to find out some more…

openSUSE 11.3 GNOME Review

Filed under
SUSE

consindo.wordpress: Unlike Ubuntu & Fedora, OpenSuse is released every 8 months. This means that they are always usually trailing Ubuntu, Fedora etc with the new Gnome, KDE. I personally prefer Gnome and even though KDE is the default option at install.

AMD Radeon HD 4250 880G On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Today we have a few benchmarks of the Radeon HD 4250 (880G) under Linux for your viewing pleasure.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Software: Audacity, Geary, GNOME Photos, Business Apps, Mir, Nix, KubeVirt, Top Projects and Apoxi

  • Audacity 2.2.2 Released with a Stack of New Features & Improvements
    This update also builds upon the major changes introduced in the release of Audacity 2.2.0 last year, as well that of the minor 2.2.1 update earlier this year.
  • Geary Email Client Mails Out a Bug Fix Update
    A new version of the Geary email client for Linux desktops is available to download. Although a (relative) minor update when compared to the huge Geary 0.12 release last year, Geary 0.12.1 is worthwhile. The update solves a stack of crashes and server compatibility issues, while also updating translations in the interface and user manual to ensure as many people can use Geary as possible.
  • GNOME Photos – An Elegant Alternative for Organizing and Sharing Photos
    How many GNU/Linux photo managers do you know have a beautiful UI for browsing photos and organizing them into collections coupled with inbuilt editing tools and cloud integration? This one goes by the name of GNOME Photos. GNOME Photos is a simple and yet elegant photo management app with which you can organize, share, and intuitively edit your photos on your Linux workstation. It features a file manager-like environment for easy navigation and cloud integration via GNOME Online Accounts.
  • Linux Means Business – Best Free Business Apps
    Let’s deal with the issue of cost up front. Every single application featured in this article is available to download without payment. This, in itself, helps to keep IT costs within a tight budget. And cost can be a very important driver when seeking an IT solution for firms – particularly for freelancers, entrepreneurs, start-ups, small businesses, and educational establishments. Naturally, these types of people and organizations will have some sort of IT budget. From a business perspective, open source business applications won’t necessarily be zero cost. Using unfamiliar software entails training costs for a firm — the costs are not limited to time itself. And then there’s the expense of obtaining support for the software, or even hiring development time to customize certain aspects of the software to add additional functionality. Off-the-shelf software is unlikely to completely address a company’s needs. But if a proprietary solution is sought, it’s likely that this development will be more expensive. It is sometimes thought that Linux software cannot rival Microsoft applications in a commercial setting because the strength of Linux comes from its price. In fact, Linux’s strength derives from other considerations such as flexibility, stability, security, cutting-edge technology, and ease of use. Additionally, the virtues of open source software are invaluable to commercial organizations whatever their size. With full access to source code, companies can easily develop extensions to the software, tailor made to their own specific needs and requirements. Moreover they are not reliant on the goodwill of a single vendor in order to do business: Linux is about freedom and choice and that is just as important to an organisation as to an individual.
  • Mir's Wayland Support Will Now Let You Drag Around Windows
    I was surprised to learn that up until this week, Mir's initial Wayland support didn't allow for windows of Wayland clients to be moved around the screen. Fortunately, that has now been resolved with allowing window movement to be initiated by Wayland clients running on Mir. Now you can enjoy Qt, GTK apps, and even the Weston Terminal to be moved around the screen. Previously there was just server-side support for moving windows in Wayland while now is client-side support.
  • Nix 2.0 Package Manager Released With A Ton Of Changes
    Nix 2.0 is now available as the latest major update to this functional package manager most commonly associated with the NixOS Linux distribution.
  • KubeVirt v0.3.0-alpha.3: Kubernetes native networking and storage
    First post for quite some time. A side effect of being busy to get streamline our KubeVirt user experience. KubeVirt v0.3.0 was not released at the beginnig of the month. That release was intended to be a little bigger, because it included a large architecture change (to the good). The change itself was amazingly friendly and went in without much problems - even if it took some time. But, the work which was building upon this patch in the storage and network areas was delayed and didn’t make it in time. Thus we skipped the release in order to let storage and network catch up.
  • Top 5 open source projects for 2018
    In our increasingly collaborative world, open source technology is a top trend that is having a major impact on the development and implementation of cutting edge capabilities. Open source is when source code connected to a program is made freely available, giving users the opportunity to make modifications and to share with other users. The common alternative to this is proprietary software, source code that remains under the strict control of an organisation, team or individual, ensuring that the integral code remains private and controlled by its owner.
  • DataTorrent Glues Open Source Componentry with ‘Apoxi’
    Building an enterprise-grade big data application with open source components is not easy. Anybody who has worked with Apache Hadoop ecosystem technology can tell you that. But the folks at DataTorrent say they’ve found a way to accelerate the delivery of secure and scalable big data applications with Apoxi, a new framework they created to stitch together major open source components like Hadoop, Spark, and Kafka, in an extensible and pluggable fashion.

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.