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Thursday, 08 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2014 - 11:05am
Story Preview: NVIDIA Tegra K1 Compared To Various x86, ARM Linux Systems Rianne Schestowitz 04/05/2014 - 6:35am
Story Lubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr: Video Review and Screnshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 11:19pm
Story Nouveau Graphics On Linux 3.15 Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 7:49pm
Story Mir 0.2.0 Under Development For Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 6:22pm
Story Possible Features To Find In OpenGL 5.0 Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 6:19pm
Story Warsow 1.5 released Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 6:09pm
Story DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport Starts Working On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 5:59pm
Story 8 Things We Expect from the Rumored Google Nexus 8 Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 5:55pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2014 - 4:22pm

openSuSE 11.1: KDE still kills it.

Filed under
SUSE

techiemoe.com: SuSE and I have a long and generally pleasant history. At least, that was the story with SuSE up until version 10.3. At that point, things started to go decidedly downhill, and it hasn't been until relatively recently that I'm beginning to feel comfortable again.

Fluxbox - Ultra-Fast/Simple Linux GUI

Filed under
Fluxbox

pcmech.com: One of the big perks of using a Linux distribution is having a choice of what window manager you want to use. The one I’ll be concentrating on is fluxbox, a window manager.

ThinkPad X300 and Linux - first impressions and power consumption issues

Filed under
Hardware

blog.gwright.org: Today I got down and installed Ubuntu 8.10 on this new X300, and things went rather smoothly. In terms of things that work, the list is rather good. However, I have noticed a few problems.

What's in a Number?

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: There's been a certain excitement in the blogosphere around the release of some figures about Firefox's market share in Europe. One thing that few seem to have picked up on is the unsatisfactory methodology behind these numbers.

Why games are the key to Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

blog.andrewmin.com: I just ordered my first computer yesterday. It’s a real he-man’s gaming computer. But while these were all expensive (especially the video card), none of them compared to one item on the list: Windows. That’s the hope that Linux companies must look forward to.

Hands-on Linux: New versions of Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: When you're talking Linux, three big names always pop up: Canonical's Ubuntu, Novell's openSUSE and Red Hat's Fedora. Each of these "big three" has recently released a new version of its distribution, which means it's time to check them out and decide which is No 1.

Look Back at KDE 2008

Filed under
KDE

digested.blogspot: The big news this year is the beginning of the KDE 4 series. On January 11, 2008 KDE 4.0 was released. KDE 4.1 was released on July 29, 2008.

Ts'o calls for pragmatic Debian

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Theodore Ts'o, Linux kernel developer and recently appointed CTO of the Linux Foundation, has called for more pragmatism from the Debian community. His comments were prompted by the recent bitter arguments over non-free firmware that lead to the resignation of Manoj Srivastava as Debian project secretary.

Coming up in 2009

Filed under
Linux

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: A lot has been written so far about what to expect next year — some valid, some not. But has that ever stopped me from joining the year-end pile-on? So here are 10 things to expect in 2009.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • First look: Linux kernel 2.6.28 officially released

  • New toy or new best friend?
  • Recording the Linux desktop -- the hard way
  • KDE Forum: Kourse 1 in Progress!
  • How to Create a Ubuntu Virtual Machine With QEMU Manager
  • Debian Lenny Release Date Confirmed
  • How to control Firefox using Vim keybindings
  • Who Owns the Netbook Trademark?
  • Enabling Gnome Numeric Keypad
  • LLVM Back-End For Gallium3D Almost There
  • Fedora and the WizardPen Tablet of Genius
  • Encrypting (almost) your entire hard drive with dm-crypt (LUKS) and lvm2, Part 2
  • Leaked Snow Leopard image potentially indicates a 32 / 64-bit divide
  • Catch-up and on-demand services on Ubuntu
  • Workaround for ICH9 Sound Problem on openSUSE 11.1
  • Ubuntu Usplash Smooth
  • Book Review: Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition
  • Converting .mp4 to .ogv format
  • Linux Outlaws 70 - The Year 2008 in Review

Small Sister project protects against e-mail snoops

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: The Small Sister open source privacy project has released a first beta of its SmallMail application, allowing individuals to send e-mail messages that can't be intercepted or traced by governments or snoops.

A Review of Linux Mint 6: Felicia

Filed under
Linux

meldroc.com: Linux Mint is a bit of a dark horse when compared with the big distros like Ubuntu, Debian, Red Hat or Gentoo. Don’t overlook it - it provides a great deal of polish that the Linux world has been looking for for a long time.

Yo Frankie! - Free Open Source Platform Game

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: We live in an economically ruled society. Especially in such a society, it’s nice to see something ‘unconditional’ from time to time.

2009: Netbook or notebook?

Filed under
Hardware

news.cnet.com: 2009 may be the year of the Netbook. But there's a big if. Here's the choice: Will consumers buy a thin, light, relatively fast $1,800 MacBook Air or a thin, light, ultrasmall, not-as-fast $700 Hewlett-Packard Mini 1000 Netbook?

Vespa: My Pink Dell Mini9 w/ Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware

princessleia.com: I’ve wanted a pink laptop for ages, this Christmas a few of my friends got together and pitched in to buy me the pink Dell Mini9 I’d been drooling over for months.

Aircraft Manager: Save Battery By Turning Off WiFi and Bluetooth

Filed under
Software

ubuntumini.com: One of the sacrifices I had to make when choosing to install Ubuntu 8.10 was that there would be no way to turn off wifi and bluetooth. The battery would drain faster because I would have to keep them powered when not using them. Recently it was brought to my attention that there is a Aircraft Manager .deb.

Linux 2.6.28 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The Linux 2.6.28 kernel was released this past week in time for the holidays. This quarterly update to the Linux kernel brought the stabilization of the EXT4 file-system, the Graphics Execution Manager, a host of new drivers, and a variety of other updates. For some weekend benchmarking we had tested the latest Linux 2.6.28 kernel.

Linux vs Windows . . . TomTom GPS

Filed under
Software

tycheent.wordpress: My wife gifted me with a TomTom ONE 125 GPS navigator. On charging it up and connecting it to my computer, I discovered that Microsoft had struck again.

What is a Window Manager

Filed under
HowTos

computingtech.blogspot: X-windows is a system that divides the labor up quite a bit. An X-windows application draws and controls only the area "inside" the window, the so-called client area. A totally separate program, called a "window manager" paints the borders and controls (such as resizing edges, maximize, minimize, and close buttons).

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More in Tux Machines

Devices/Mobile

  • AsteroidOS is an Open Source OS for Smartwatches
    Florent Revest is a French computer science student who has been working on an open source operating system for smartwatches for the last two years. Yesterday, he officially launched version 1 of the alpha for AsteroidOS. The goal for the platform was to create something that gave smartwatch owners more control over their privacy, as well as the hardware they purchased. Florent feels that the current proprietary platforms do not guarantee this, and this was the basis for AsteroidOS. He wanted his open source smartwatch operating system to provide freedom with free software, more privacy than other wearable platforms offer, interoperability so it could communicate with other devices, modularity that enabled the user to tweak and change the OS as they see fit, the ability to port the software to as many devices as possible, and gathering a community who is passionate about the platform.
  • AsteroidOS Brings Open Source Functionality To Smartwatches
    Smartwatches may not have taken off like companies were hoping, but they have come quite far in terms of what they can offer and what sorts of features are available for the many different models of smartwatches that are out there. Even with the updated functionality of options like Samsung’s Gear S lineup and Android Wear platforms, though, smartwatches can still feel a little bit limiting, and part of this undoubtedly includes the reason that the operating systems aren’t as open as platforms like Android. That is now changing thanks to a platform called AsteroidOS which is an open source operating system for smartwatches.
  • Mini Apollo Lake module takes the heat — and the cold
    Congatec’s “Conga-MA5” is a Linux-ready COM Express Compact Type 10 Mini module with Apollo Lake SoCs, up to 128GB eMMC 5.1, and -40 to 85°C support. Congatec was one of the first embedded vendors to announce computer-on-modules based on Intel’s Atom E3900 and other Apollo Lake Pentium and Celeron SoCs. The offerings included a Qseven module, a SMARC 2.0 module, and a COM Express Compact Type 6 Conga-TCA5. The company has now followed up with a COM Express Compact Type 10 Mini Conga-MA5 module.
  • Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for November 2016, Tizen Smartphone
  • Smartphone game: Indian Football League game comes to the Tizen Store

Security News

Red Hat and Fedora

Technical
  • Red Hat Takes OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat has steadily taken significant steps in the cloud computing arena, expanding the focus of its OpenShift open source Platform-as-a-Service hybrid cloud computing offering, including launching a cloud-hosted commercial edition called OpenShift Online. Now, the company has announced the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, according to Red Hat. Users also get access to Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Red Hat Launches OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s award-winning container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, benefiting from Red Hat’s deep enterprise experience. Users also benefit from Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Image Gallery: Synnex Cloud Catalyst Conference Featuring Red Hat, XMedius, Plantronics
Financial Fedora/Community
  • Fedora 23 End of Life
    With the recent release of Fedora 25, Fedora 23 will officially enter End Of Life (EOL) status on December 20th, 2016. After December 20th, all packages in the Fedora 23 repositories will no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates, and no new packages will be added to the Fedora 23 collection. Upgrading to Fedora 24 or Fedora 25 before December 20th 2016 is highly recommended for all users still running Fedora 23.
  • What Is Wayland and What Does It Means for Linux Users
    Fedora 25 is now out. People are buzzing, as the team have decided to make Wayland the default graphical session going forward. For many Linux users Wayland is a new term that has popped up, but one that they do not understand. In this article we’ll briefly go over what Wayland is, what it does, and why developers are flocking to it in droves! What exactly is Wayland? Let’s find out!
  • Korora 25 is Ready
    The Korora Project has released version 25 (codename "Gurgle") which is now available for download. As usual, you can find a list of already known problems at the common F25 bugs page.
  • Fedora Design Interns Update
  • Holiday Break 2016.
    It’s sad I don’t get more time to post here these days. Being a manager is a pretty busy job, although I have no complaints! It’s enjoyable, and fortunately I have one of the best teams imaginable to work with, the Fedora Engineering team.

openSUSE Says Goodbye to AMD/ATI Catalyst (fglrx) Proprietary Graphics Drivers

openSUSE developer Bruno Friedmann, informed the community of the openSUSE Linux operating system about the fact that he's planning to remove the old ATI/AMD Catalyst (also known as fglrx) proprietary graphics drivers. Read more