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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 18 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LibreOffice 5.0: A Unique Release Roy Schestowitz 07/07/2015 - 9:39am
Story Exploring Alpine Linux 3.2.0 Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2015 - 9:23am
Story How I Discovered Linux & Changed the World Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2015 - 8:53am
Story Linux on the desktop is so hot there's now a fight over it Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2015 - 8:47am
Story Containers Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2015 - 8:12am
Story Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2015 - 8:11am
Story An Introduction to Linux Containers Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 11:45pm
Story Speech recognition and synthesis shield runs Linux Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 11:40pm
Story Ubuntu Developers Working on Feature Parity for Unity 8 - Video Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 9:51pm
Story GPS Navigation for Ubuntu Touch Gets More Features Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2015 - 9:39pm

Is Linux Secure

Filed under
Security
  • Linux infection proves Windows malware monopoly is over
  • "Is Linux Secure?" at Southeast LinuxFest

Lubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Lubuntu 10.04
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Review
  • Netbook MeeGo a NoGo - Review

5 Things New Linux Converts Should Know

Filed under
Linux

techthrob.com: If you’ve recently converted to Linux from Windows, or if you’re just giving Linux a shot, there are a few things you need to know right off the bat about how Linux works and where the major differences are when compared to Windows.

What Happened to IBM's Linux Wristwatch?

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: In 2000, IBM researchers developed a wristwatch that runs Linux and X11. Their goal was to test the limits of the operating system and explore ways people can interact with tiny electronic devices. So what happened to this Linux-powered wristwatch?

Adobe euthanizes Flash 10.1 for 64-bit Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Adobe euthanizes Flash 10.1 for 64-bit Linux
  • Has Adobe killed 64-bit flash?
  • Flash Player 10 for 64-bit Linux

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • What's in your 2014 Linux desktop?
  • KDE4.5 beta 2 short review
  • Open source hardware worth $1billion by 2015
  • Open Source Tools in GIS
  • Why GNU/Linux is Unmatched – and Unmatchable
  • Next3: Ext3 with snapshots
  • Zippl – a Lightweigth Presentation Tool
  • Weekly Kernel Review (openSUSE Flavor)
  • Coming soon: an open source Dropbox alternative
  • MeeGo Loves The openSUSE Build Service
  • Leffe using Drupal
  • Varnish using Drupal
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2010.06.11
  • Linux Outlaws 155 - There is No Fabian Stable

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Disable User List and Preselect User in KDM Login Manager
  • VIM Tips: make Things Work
  • Fixing Mplayer's Terminal Abuse
  • 5 Things to Know About dpkg Package Manager
  • Fixing Fullscreen Flash in Ubuntu
  • How to configure BSNL EVDO on Linux
  • Truecrypt Trouble Triumph
  • Quickly Run with a Ctrl+R Keyboard Shortcut in Gedit
  • Bash Redirections Using Exec
  • Access Windows Home Server from an Ubuntu Computer on your Network
  • Automatic upgrade testing from Lenny to Squeeze
  • fuse: failed to exec fusermount: Permission denied
  • Apache Document Root in Mandriva 2010

London event looks to boost Ubuntu users

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • London event looks to boost Ubuntu users
  • Ubuntu Software Center Gets Visual Improvements
  • Ubuntu, Windows 7, OS X, or thin computing
  • Running Windows Files in Ubuntu 10.04: The Wrong Approach

freshmeat.net to be closed

Filed under
OSS
Web

blog.devx.com: Geek.net, the parent company of SourceForge.net, Slashdot.org, ThinkGeek.com, Geek.com, freshmeat.net, and ohloh.net, has told employees that it will be closing freshmeat.net and ohloh.net.

Microsoft legal foes withdraw EU complaint

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft legal foes withdraw EU complaint
  • Windows XP netbooks are officially an endangered species… again
  • Microsoft explains mystery Firefox extension, "fixes" upd

My take on the FSF action against Apple over GNU Go

Filed under
OSS
  • My take on the FSF action against Apple over GNU Go
  • Apple would rather remove app than leave open-source license

Distro Review: Gentoo Linux

Filed under
Gentoo
  • Distro Review: Gentoo Linux
  • Why does gentoo suck?

Puppy Linux 5 Lucid Puppy - Nothing but praise

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: You all know that I absolutely love Linux Puppy. I've tried Puppy years ago and instantly loved it, loved the precise art of fitting so many great, useful programs and tools into such a tiny package. And now, there's a new reason to love it even more. Version 5.

When users first encounter Ubuntu – 5 show stoppers!

Filed under
Ubuntu

design.canonical.com: We recently conducted usability testing to see how users respond to Ubuntu on their first encounter.

Also: 5 Beautiful Themes by PR09Studio

I'm a BSD

Filed under
BSD

oreilly.com: This week I am taking FreeBSD 8.0 for a spin. So far, I like it enough that it will probably be my normal desktop environment. It seems to have the right stuff: my PC seems markedly faster.

Interview: Karl Fischer – Department Of Science and Technology South Africa

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

g33q.co.za: Geeks love discussing new things. They love discussing new things over lunch even more. I had the pleasure of spending a very informative lunch with Karl Fischer recently. Here is a guy with a real passion for Open Source Software.

Top 10 Linux Powered Robots From Around The World

Filed under
Linux

techdrivein.com: Linux have a special place in Robotics. Many Robots built by multi billion organizations like NASA for advanced space exploration and other complicated tasks are powered by Linux. Here is a nicely compiled list of Robots powered by Linux from around the world.

Broken Links in Linux File Systems can be a Security Risk

Filed under
Security

tcs-security-blanket.blogspot: BROKEN LINKS in Linux file systems are not just annoying — they can also be a security risk. In a previous post, I discussed the potential dangers of unowned files and in this post I will talk about those annoying, resource consuming broken links usually considered simple file system “lint”.

Pino: Fedora’s default social tool

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Where would we be today without social networking? I have heard many tales how a social tool has saved a life or joined two lives together. I have covered Gwibber, which wis the Ubuntu default social networking tool. This time around I will focus on Pino.

SuperGrub is a Sanity Saver

Filed under
Software

gnuru.org: Thank you people at SuperGrub, you saved my computer.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Updated F27 Live ISOs, Synergy 2.0, Bodhi 3.2.0, Announcing Flapjack

  • F27-20180112 Updated Live Isos Released
    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.13-300 kernel.
  • synergy-2.0.0 is in Fedora updates-testing
    I have packed the latest stable version, 2.0.0, for Fedora 27, 26 and EPEL 7. No EPEL 6 update this time as it requires CXX14, which EL6 does not provide.
  • Bodhi 3.2.0 released
  • Announcing Flapjack
    Here’s a post about a tool that I’ve developed at work. You might find it useful if you contribute to any desktop platform libraries that are packaged as a Flatpak runtime, such as GNOME or KDE. Flatpak is a system for delivering desktop applications that was pioneered by the GNOME community. At Endless, we have jumped aboard the Flatpak train. Our product Endless OS is a Linux distribution, but not a traditional one in the sense of being a collection of packages that you install with a package manager; it’s an immmutable OS image, with atomic updates delivered through OSTree. Applications are sandboxed-only and Flatpak-only.
  • Flapjack Helps Developers Work On Components Inside Flatpak

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Latvia's e-health system hit by cyberattack from abroad
    Latvia said its new e-health system was on Tuesday hit by a large-scale cyberattack that saw thousands of requests for medical prescriptions pour in per second from more than 20 countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the European Union. No data was compromised, according to health officials, who immediately took down the site, which was launched earlier this month to streamline the writing of prescriptions in the Baltic state. "It is clear that it was a planned attack, a widespread attack—we might say a specialised one—as it emanated from computers located in various different countries, both inside the European Union and outside Europe," state secretary Aivars Lapins told reporters. "We received thousands of requests in a very short space of time. That's not the normal way the system works," he said, adding that an investigation is under way.
  • Linux Lite Developer Creates Automated Spectre/Meltdown Checker for Linux OSes
    The developer of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distribution has created a script that makes it easier for Linux users to check if their systems are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws. As we reported last week, developer Stéphane Lesimple created an excellent script that would check if your Linux distribution's kernel is patched against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that have been publicly disclosed earlier this month and put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Purism Releases Meltdown and Spectre Patches for Its Librem Linux Laptops
    Purism, the computer technology company behind the privacy-focused, Linux-based Librem laptops and the upcoming smartphone, released patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities. The company was one of the first Linux OEMs and OS vendor to announce that it's working on addressing both the Meltdown and Spectre security exploits on his Linux laptops. Meltdown and Spectre have been unearthed in early January and they are two severe hardware bugs that put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Facebook Awards Security Researchers $880,000 in 2017 Bug Bounties
    Facebook is hardly a small organization, with large teams of engineers and security professionals on staff. Yet even Facebook has found that it can profit from expertise outside of the company, which is why the social networking giant has continued to benefit from its bug bounty program. In 2017, Facebook paid out $880,000 to security researchers as part of its bug bounty program. The average reward payout in 2017 was $1,900, up from $1,675 in 2016.
  • Multicloud Deployments Create Security Challenges, F5 Report Finds

Arch Linux vs. Antergos vs. Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu Benchmarks

Last week when sharing the results of tweaking Ubuntu 17.10 to try to make it run as fast as Clear Linux, it didn't take long for Phoronix readers to share their opinions on Arch Linux and the request for some optimized Arch Linux benchmarks against Clear Linux. Here are some results of that testing so far in carrying out a clean Arch Linux build with some basic optimizations compared to using Antergos Minimal out-of-the-box, Ubuntu Server, and Clear Linux. Tests this time around were done on the Intel Core i9 7980XE system with ASUS PRIME X299-A motherboard, 4 x 4GB DDR4-3200 Corsair memory, GeForce GTX 750, and Corsair Force MP500 120GB NVMe solid-state drive. The system with 18 cores / 36 threads does make for quick and easy compiling of many Linux packages. Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Making WebAssembly even faster: Firefox’s new streaming and tiering compiler
    People call WebAssembly a game changer because it makes it possible to run code on the web faster. Some of these speedups are already present, and some are yet to come. One of these speedups is streaming compilation, where the browser compiles the code while the code is still being downloaded. Up until now, this was just a potential future speedup. But with the release of Firefox 58 next week, it becomes a reality. Firefox 58 also includes a new 2-tiered compiler. The new baseline compiler compiles code 10–15 times faster than the optimizing compiler.
  • Firefox Telemetry Use Counters: Over-estimating usage, now fixed
    Firefox Telemetry records the usage of certain web features via a mechanism called Use Counters. Essentially, for every document that Firefox loads, we record a “false” if the document didn’t use a counted feature, and a “true” if the document did use that counted feature.
  • Firefox 58 new contributors
  • Giving and receiving help at Mozilla
    This is going to sound corny, but helping people really is one of my favorite things at Mozilla, even with projects I have mostly moved on from. As someone who primarily works on internal tools, I love hearing about bugs in the software I maintain or questions on how to use it best. Given this, you might think that getting in touch with me via irc or slack is the fastest and best way to get your issue addressed. We certainly have a culture of using these instant-messaging applications at Mozilla for everything and anything. Unfortunately, I have found that being “always on” to respond to everything hasn’t been positive for either my productivity or mental health. My personal situation aside, getting pinged on irc while I’m out of the office often results in stuff getting lost — the person who asked me the question is often gone by the time I return and am able to answer.
  • Friend of Add-ons: Trishul Goe
    Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Trishul Goel! Trishul first became involved with Mozilla five years when he was introduced to the Firefox OS smartphone. As a JavaScript developer with an interest in Mozilla’s mission, he looked for opportunities to get involved and began contributing to SUMO, L10n, and the Firefox OS Marketplace, where he contributed code and developed and reviewed apps. After Firefox OS was discontinued as a commercial product, Trishul became interested in contributing to Mozilla’s add-ons projects. After landing his first code contributions to addons.mozilla.org (AMO), he set about learning how to develop extensions for Firefox using WebExtensions APIs. Soon, he began sharing his knowledge by leading and mentoring workshops for extension developers as part of Mozilla’s “Build Your Own Extension” Activate campaign.