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Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The 10 lamest Firefox add-ons

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  • The 10 lamest Firefox add-ons

  • FireFox 3 Add-ons Recommendation List
  • Firefox Add-ons - Manage browser add-ons in centralized manner

Linux-Based Instant-On Trend Spreads Out

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  • Linux-Based Instant-On Trend Spreads Out

  • The Race to Instant-On Computers Begins
  • Could Linux be the key to instant-on for Windows laptops?

How to sell Linux netbooks to the world

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Hardware 2008 has been the year of the netbook. Since the surprise runaway success of the ASUS Eee Linux PC in 2007 there has been a surge of hardware vendors joining in. Yet MSI users have poo-pooed the use of Linux on these systems. I disagree. Here's why Linux netbooks are the future.

10 Essential Applications in Ubuntu 8.10 & others

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  • 10 Essential Applications Included in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • Quick hint: Ubuntu 8.10 might already be here
  • 15 Beautiful Ubuntu Wallpapers for a Sleeker Intrepid Ibex
  • Ubuntu 8.10 better than Fedora 10?
  • Searching for package information on Debian and Ubuntu systems
  • Close but no cigar for me and Ubuntu on my Eee PC
  • Canonical's Next (And Hardest) Steps

It's Time for a FOSS Community Code of Conduct

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OSS Personal abuse, quotes taken out of context, misrepresentations, outright lies -- if you have any visibility in the free and open source software (FOSS) community, the chances are that you regularly face all these kinds of attacks. I suggest that community members voluntarily subscribe to a code of conduct to create a frame of reference in which the abuse can be countered and judged.

How Different Are Linux Distributions from One Another?

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computingtech.blogspot: While different Linux systems will add different logos, choose some different software components to include, and have different ways of installing and configuring Linux, most people who become used to Linux can move pretty easily from one Linux to another. There are a few reasons for this:

The netbook newbie's guide to Linux

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Linux Episode Two This is a series about the Linux OS on netbooks, but we need to remind ourselves that these devices aren't personal computers. Netbooks are essentially machines you work through, out into the Cloud.

The LXF Analysis: Open source innovations

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OSS Open source/Free Software often gets a bad rap for innovation. It just copies commercial software, right? Not so, as Neil Bothwick explains -- from eye candy to the internet, FOSS has pioneered new technologies and ways of working...

Ubuntu 8.10 Slowness Dictates Needed Direction Of Newer OS Releases

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Linux "Linux" and "Slower" never fall within the same sentence, but they do now. To calm the masses out there, no, Ubuntu 8.10 will not be a crawling nightmare of computer slowness. Reading the article about the benchmark testing just goes to prove that the other shoe has finally dropped, so to speak.

Interview With Adam Oslen - Exaile Player Developer

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helpforlinux.blogspot: Few weeks ago I reviewed Exaile and have been so impressed with it that it has replaced Amarok as the default music player on my Ubuntu. So I hunted around a bit to talk to its lead developer - Adam Olsen about Exaile. He promised me that there are some great things to come in future versions. Read on to find out more:

A Closer Look At Red Hat's Plymouth

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Linux Back in July we shared Red Hat's intentions to replace RHGB with Plymouth, a new graphical boot process that is able to benefit from the latest Linux graphics capabilities. Red Hat engineers had primarily designed Plymouth around a forthcoming feature we've talked about quite a bit known as kernel mode-setting, which provides end-users with a cleaner and flicker-free boot experience.

Preventing MySQL Injection Attacks With GreenSQL On Debian Etch

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GreenSQL (or greensql-fw) is a firewall for MySQL databases that filters SQL injection attacks. It works as a reverse proxy, i.e., it takes the SQL queries, checks them, passes them on to the MySQL database and delivers back the result from the MySQL database.

today's leftovers

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  • Non-Geeks Installing Ubuntu: Why Linux Needs Better Wireless Support

  • Interview: Fedora 10’s Better Startup
  • Mozilla's Privacy UI
  • Open Source Smackdown - live or die in the new economy, it all has an OSS angle now
  • Linux applications gain new developers on Windows and OS X
  • VMware users await Windows-free VirtualCenter, VI Client
  • Alleged Israeli GPL violation settled out of court
  • How to disable SSH host key checking
  • Mandriva Linux One 2009 - Post Installation Impressions
  • Linux May Be Worth $10.8 Billion, but Is It for Everyone?
  • Shuttleworth will burn fortune for Ubuntu
  • Opera scrambles to quash zero-day bug in freshly-patched browser
  • A look at OpenOffice Community Innovation Award winners
  • Neil Gaiman: Piracy vs. Obscurity
  • Open source begins to beat brand in business
  • Amarok October Updates
  • New Netflix player uses Silverlight to reach Mac, Linux
  • My children are already being sucked into the open-source vortex

KDE and the apps that keep the dragon hot

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bushweed.blogspot: People often question why i use Linux as a primary OS at home. In fact it is the only OS i use at home, although i have a Windows XP CD somewhere. Other than the obvious security features, and stability to the core, there are certain apps which i class as my killer apps.

Mom-compatible Kubuntu Intrepid with KDE 4

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Ubuntu A few weeks ago, our neighbor, a fifty-something housewife, asked us to have a look at her rather new computer making strange noises and refusing to boot. Of course, this was the ideal moment to try what we first thought to end up with a dual boot:

Kernel log: 2.6.28-rc1 released, new graphics and camera drivers

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Linux The maintainers of the stable kernel have released versions, and, as expected. Apart from bug fixes and minor improvements, all of the versions also offer a patch for CVE-2008-3831, the security hole in the DRI code for recent Intel graphics chipsets.

SimplyMEPIS 8.0 Beta 4 Adds New Broadcom Support

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Linux ISO files of the fourth beta of SimplyMEPIS 8.0 are available for 32 and 64 bit processors. In this release the kernel has been updated to upstream version and the Broadcom wl driver is now avilable for wireless N cards.

Why I Am Not A "Linux Advocate"

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Linux At first, you might mistake me for a "Linux advocate". I'm running a site about Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), of which Linux is counted as an example. I certainly bring up Linux and the programs that run on it a lot.

BoycottNovell: just another website pushing a point of view

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Web Four days ago, an article purporting to analyse the raison d'etre behind the website appeared on the site. The author, Bruce Byfield, who styles himself as a "computer journalist", however, failed to tell his reading public that the piece was just a thinly disguised and veiled attack on the person who runs the BoycottNovell site.

some howtos:

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  • Vim Cheatsheet

  • How to mount Linux filesystem under FreeBSD
  • 5 Simple APT Tricks for Debian and Ubuntu
  • Tuning the Linux file system Ext3
  • Recover a corrupted signatures rpm database
  • Tip - Disable the ‘Help Agent’ Popup
  • Recover your lost Root Password openSUSE
  • Forwarding X over SSH in 3 simple steps
  • Teach an old shell new tricks with BashDiff
  • Using dmidecode to find out what memory chips you have
  • Tip: Bash Shortcuts
  • Easy way to insert nonbreaking hyphen, etc. in OOo Writer
  • Where to search Ubuntu Personal Package Archives (PPA)
  • Copying a Filesystem between Computers
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More in Tux Machines

TheSSS 20.0 Server-Oriented Linux Distro Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.17, PHP 5.6

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia today, October 26, 2016, about the release and immediate availability of version 20.0 of his server-oriented TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) GNU/Linux distribution. Read more

Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Daily Build ISO Images Are Now Available for Download

Now that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system is officially open for development, the first daily build ISO images have published in the usual places for early adopters and public testers. Read more

Today in Techrights

OSS Leftovers

  • Chain Releases Open Source Blockchain Solution for Banks
    Chain, a San Francisco-based Blockchain startup, launched the Chain Core Developer Edition, which is a distributed ledger infrastructure built for banks and financial institutions to utilize the Blockchain technology in mainstream finance. Similar to most cryptocurrency networks like Bitcoin, developers and users are allowed to run their applications and platforms on the Chain Core testnet, a test network sustained and supported by leading institutions including Microsoft and the Initiative for Cryptocurrency and Contracts (IC3), which is operated by Cornell University, UC Berkeley and University of Illinois.
  • Netflix Upgrades its Powerful "Chaos Monkey" Open Cloud Utility
    Few organizations have the cloud expertise that Netflix has, and it may come as a surprise to some people to learn that Netflix regularly open sources key, tested and hardened cloud tools that it has used for years. We've reported on Netflix open sourcing a series of interesting "Monkey" cloud tools as part of its "simian army," which it has deployed as a series satellite utilities orbiting its central cloud platform. Netflix previously released Chaos Monkey, a utility that improves the resiliency of Software as a Service by randomly choosing to turn off servers and containers at optimized tims. Now, Netflix has announced the upgrade of Chaos Monkey, and it's worth checking in on this tool.
  • Coreboot Lands More RISC-V / lowRISC Code
    As some early post-Coreboot 4.5 changes are some work to benefit fans of the RISC-V ISA.
  • Nextcloud Advances with Mobile Moves
    The extremely popular ownCloud open source file-sharing and storage platform for building private clouds has been much in the news lately. CTO and founder of ownCloud Frank Karlitschek resigned from the company a few months ago. His open letter announcing the move pointed to possible friction created as ownCloud moved forward as a commercial entity as opposed to a solely community focused, open source project. Karlitschek had a plan, though. He is now out with a fork of ownCloud called Nextcloud, and we've reported on strong signs that this cloud platform has a bright future. In recent months, the company has continued to advance Nextcloud. Along with Canonical and Western Digital, the partners have launched an Ubuntu Core Linux-based cloud storage and Internet of Things device called Nextcloud Box, which we covered here. Now, Nextcloud has moved forward with some updates to its mobile strategy. Here are details.
  • Using Open Source for Data
    Bryan Liles, from DigitalOcean, explains about many useful open source big data tools in this eight minute video. I learned about Apache Mesos, Apache Presto, Google Kubernetes and more.