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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story WebODF easily used, part 1: ViewerJS Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:47am
Story Mozilla at O’Reilly Open Source Convention Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:44am
Story Per-activity favourites in Kickoff Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:40am
Story Rumors circulate Motorola is building the next Nexus device Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:28am
Story Meson: A Next-Gen Build System Showing Promise Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:19am
Story DARPA-derived secure microkernel goes open source tomorrow Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:12am
Story GUADEC 2014, Day Two: Pitivi, Automotive, Boxes, Fleet Commander Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:04am
Story Debian 8.0 Jessie Is Settling For Linux 3.16 Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 7:51am
Story First Okular Sprint ever at Barcelona Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 7:48am
Story 2014 Calligra Sprint in Deventer Rianne Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 9:59pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Tutorial: An Introduction to Linux CLI

  • Howto: Create launchers using easy bash scripts
  • Install Codecs Flash JRE Without Internet In Ubuntu
  • Linux Determine which Services are Enabled at Boot
  • How to Install Hercules Classic Silver Webcam in Ubuntu
  • Preventing a service from starting on Debian or Ubuntu
  • OpenGL in Mandriva
  • Burning ISOs in CLI using OpenSUSE 11.1
  • File Synchronization with Rsync over SSH
  • Dropbox for Linux
  • lsof Seeks All Open Files

The Beginner's Guide to Linux Part 4: Introduction to the Terminal

Filed under
HowTos

maximumpc.com: Traditionally, most new users have always been reluctant to experiment with the command line interface. Once you understand the terminal, Linux will finally open up to you. The terminal is easily the most powerful part of a Linux system.

A new free antivirus for Unix/Linux platform

Filed under
Software

ubuntugeek.com: Today I’d like to introduce to you all a brand new antivirus for Unix/Linux platform from a famous company, BitDefender.

Linux desktop neglect

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: Why isn't Linux on more desktops? Here's the reason we don't talk about much: the Linux distributors don't encourage the Linux desktop.

Introducing KDE 4: Kontacts: Calendar (KOrganizer)

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: Welcome to the third issue of the Kontact suit series. Today we'll give a look at the Calendar kpart (KOrganizer):

Wrist-mounted computer runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Glacier Computer has announced a wearable computer that runs Linux and includes built-in WiFi along with GPS and Bluetooth options. The wrist-mounted "Ridgeline W200" has a 3.5-inch touchscreen display, backlit keys, a hot-swappable battery pack, and an electronic compass.

Mercurial vs Git

Filed under
Software

rg03.wordpress: There are many blog posts and articles all over the Internet providing comparissons between Git and Mercurial. Most of them only briefly describe the main differences and then try to decide which one is better. However, I didn’t find many articles explaining the differences in detail.

Telerik ports .NET controls to Linux

Filed under
Software

sdtimes.com: Telerik has partnered with Novell to certify that its RadControls ASP.NET AJAX component suite supports the open-source Mono runtime environment, permitting developers to build .NET applications in a Linux environment.

Also: Using MoMA to Port from Windows .NET to Mono on Linux

All the Best Linux Cheat Sheets

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com; All the best Linux cheat sheets rounded up in one post broken down into Linux command line, Linux security, Linux administration, Gnome/KDE, sed/awk/vim, and distribution specific cheat sheets..

8 Reasons You Should Switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

namd3r.com: Most Linux distributions, like Ubuntu and Fedora, come absolutely free of charge to install, distribute, reinstall, and modify without worrying about breaking any copyright or pirating laws.

Linux device developers not weird, just mainstream

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Developers putting Linux on consumer devices aren't weirdos mining a niche, according to the Intel man who last year volunteered to help maintain embedded Linux.

Supporting Linux in the Microsoft Enterprise

Filed under
Linux

daileymuse.com: Linux adoption in the enterprise data center continues to grow in terms of both numbers of servers and the variety of roles Linux occupies. As these deployments become more pervasive in the enterprise so too does the need for the integration and interoperability.

Does Uptime still matter?

ducea.com: When I started working as a sysadmin (about 10 years ago) there was this obsession about uptime. Everyone considered this the greatest sign that you are doing a good job as a sysadmin if you were able ‘to keep the machine running’ for a long time.

How much legal trouble is Cisco in against the FSF?

Filed under
Legal

blogs.zdnet.com: A new Law.Com analysis indicates Cisco may be in big legal trouble over the FSF lawsuit alleging it misused open source code in its hardware. Until you learn the rest of the story.

Is Linux ready to go to FAT camp?

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch.com: The talking drums keep rumbling throughout the Linux jungle as the tuxified ones ponder the impact of Dutch personal navigation device (PND) vendor TomTom agreeing to terms after being sued by Microsoft.

Mandriva 2009.1 RC2 Screenshot Tour

Filed under
MDV

softpedia.com: Mandriva announced last night the immediate availability of Mandriva Linux 2009.1 RC2. Once again, we thought it would be nice to offer a visual tour of this second release candidate of the upcoming Mandriva 2009 Spring.

Intel Core i7 On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: By now most of you should be familiar with the Core i7 processor family, which is based upon Intel's Nehalem architecture. The current Core i7 processor selection includes the 920, 940, and 965 Extreme Edition.

Red Hat Dismisses Consumer Desktop Linux (Again)

workswithu.com: Sometimes, you have to respect someone for sticking to an opinion and a vision. Other times, you have to wonder if a consistent vision becomes a fatal flaw. I’m still undecided about whether Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst has the correct — or flawed — long term vision.

Some not so wobbly news from wobblyland

Filed under
KDE

martin-graesslin.com/blog: Long time no post on what has changed in KWin lately. So I’m going to show you some new features.

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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