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Wednesday, 24 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The use of Linux and open source in pre-schools

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: What started as wondering how to contribute to my 5 year old son’s pre-school lead to the discovery of some absolutely terrific open source software that really aids the educational process. Here’s why even in this Microsoft world Linux is the best platform for early childhood education.

State of the LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: Linux is beginning to find its legs as the foundation in many different technologies and in the process is fueling a feedback loop that is helping accelerate the operating system's popularity. The evidence of the cooperation will be on display at next week's LinuxWorld conference in San Francisco.

Puppy's Leader Retirement pre-announcement

Filed under
Linux

puppylinux.com/blog: One of them is that I would like to move to developing an application, in particular I am interested in porting my EVE vector editor to Linux, running with one of the native GUI libraries such as GTK. Also, I would like to do other things.

How Dell and System76’s Ubuntu Machines Stack Up to Their Mac Counterparts

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

dawningvalley.com: Open source operating systems obviously give more bang for the buck than any other operating system in the world. After all, they’re free, and you can’t get lower than free (unless you’re Kaspersky). However, what about pre-installed Ubuntu machines? Do they beat their Windows and OS X competitors in the bang for the buck category?

Don't Like Mono? Try Vala.

Filed under
Software

blog.ibeentoubuntu: My recent post about Mono was sincere, and Boycott Novell has the story about Debian wrong, but Gnome actually is pushing an alternative. Vala is a new language developed by Gnome specifically for developing Gnome apps. It has a syntax very similar to Java or C# (closer to C# from what I've read) and a precompiler which maps the Vala to C source and header files

KDE 4.1 Live CD

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

lazytechguy.com: I just bought a new laptop and KDE guys decide to pamper me by releasing the greatest desktop manager in form of KDE 4.1. To add cherry to the cake OpenSUSE guys made a Live CD and gave me the opportunity to fiddle with it.

Ace in the hole

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

chinwong.com: IT’S difficult to write about the Aspire One from Acer without gushing. Out of the box, this mini-notebook is the perfect traveling companion for anyone who simply needs to surf the Web, send e-mail and perform typical office tasks such as typing up documents, working on spreadsheets or giving a presentation.

Visualizing Open Source Development

Filed under
Software

technocrat.net: An open source project called Code_Swarm has come up with an animated process video outlining the various ways open source projects get started and are refined.

7 Uses of GParted Live

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: I’ve been using GNU Parted to slice and dice my disk in preference to the fdisk for almost as long as I’ve been using Linux. We all fill up our hard-drives from time to time, but thanks to Gnome GParted, rearranging disk partitions isn’t as terrifying as it used to be.

The Chicken Crossing The Road

Filed under
Humor

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: NT Chicken: Will cross the road in June. No, August. September for sure. OS/2 Chicken: It crossed the road in style years ago, but it was so quiet that nobody noticed.

GNOME Layout

Filed under
Software

jaysonrowe.wordpress: I’ve often wondered why more of the popular Linux distro’s don’t adopt what most new user’s to Linux would feel as “normal” as a default layout. I wonder how many “newbie” Linux users HATE the two panels taking up screen-space, yet have no clue that it can be consolidated into one.

Why is there no real FOSS social network?

Filed under
Software

seanrtilley.blogspot: I have had a thought. Upon looking upon a identi.ca today, I had a thought. While we have a VERY nice alternative to Twitter, what about a full-on alternative to Myspace?

The revenge of the Linux munchkins

Filed under
Linux

thebeezspeaks.blogspot: We have known about the Microsoft muchkins all our lives. Those are people who are paid to scan the Internet for unfavorable articles and use the comment facilities to do what Microsoft does best: spread FUD. As far as I know there is no such equivalent in the Linux world. It just seems like that.

more odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Bug your distro to package OpenJPEG

  • Google bans the Mozilla Public License
  • How to convert an img file to an iso
  • Gentoo Install Notes for a Fujitsu LifeBook A6110
  • Leaking information about Boston Summit 2008

KDE 4.1 Mania (Overview on Kubuntu, Fedora and Opensuse)

Filed under
KDE

linux-guider.blogspot: KDE 4 is the current series of releases of the K Desktop Environment. The first version (4.0.0) of this series was released on 11 January 2008. KDE 4.1 was released on July 29, 2008. KDE 4.1 includes a shared emoticon theming system which is used in PIM and Kopete, and DXS.

KDE 4.1: Good, bad, or beautiful?

Filed under
KDE

celettu.wordpress: The last week, I’ve been struggling with KDE 4.1. I really want to like it. Actually, I do like it. It’s stable, it’s fast, and it’s gorgeous. I love the Oxygen look, the plasmoids, the KWin desktop effects…it all looks great.

gDesklets - Desklets for your Desktop in openSUSE

Filed under
Software
HowTos

susegeek.com: gDesklets is another great tool like Google Gadgets for bringing mini programs called desklets such as weather forecasts, news tickers, system information displays, or music player controls, onto your desktop, where they are sitting there in a symbiotic relationship of eye candy and usefulness.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Managing packages using apt on Ubuntu

  • Enable NumLock in KDE 4.1
  • Getting Ruby Plasmoids up and running in KDE 4.1 (on Kubuntu)
  • NIC bonding with Ubuntu

some bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • A Quick Look at Xubuntu Xtreme

  • Linux Mint one year later
  • GNU/Linux
  • My Week in Ubuntu: KDE 4.1
  • Sabayon 3.5

some shorts & stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 49 - Summer of Crap

  • More fun than it looks: Compiz + MPX
  • Theme Fix in Ubuntu 8.10
  • More Weekend Unix and Linux Levity
  • Ask Linux.com: Quotas, Java, and Linux in the car
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Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances. The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered. Read more

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