Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Another day, another OpenSSL patch Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 4:29pm
Story ChaletOS 14.04.2 review - Digital white chocolate Roy Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 4:05pm
Story Launchpad Development Starts Again Roy Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 4:03pm
Story Google Not Scoffing at AI, Files Patent Applications Roy Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:54pm
Story Canonical Is Back To Doing Feature Development For Launchpad Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:19pm
Story 5 open source alternatives to Google Docs Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:15pm
Story More Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition Purchase Invites Are Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:11pm
Story The Next Big Thing in Open-Source May Be Housing Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 3:02pm
Story French robot company raising money for open source companion robot “BUDDY” Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 2:54pm
Story Endless: A computer the rest of the world can afford Rianne Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 2:44pm

Fedora 13 Boasts Many Leading-Edge Enhancements

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: Red Hat's Fedora 13 open-source software can serve in a full gamut of Linux roles, as long as users are prepared to upgrade their systems about once a year.

10 Best Free Alternatives to Microsoft Office

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: The full and complete package of Office costs more than some people's mortgage payments. Fortunately, Office is not the only option available to get the work done. Here are ten FREE alternatives to what Microsoft Office has to offer.

So Dell, is Ubuntu safer than Windows or not?

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcpro.co.uk: Dell appears to be back-tracking on a claim made on its website that Ubuntu is safer than Windows.

Linux, trojans and viruses. A real threat?

Filed under
Security

toolbox.com/blogs: While there is no excuse for inattention and lack of knowledge, the fact is that there are Linux virus's (viruses, virii?) and there will be more.

Why Ubuntu is harder than Windows

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu
Humor

jeffhoogland.blogspot: I use Ubuntu on all my personal computers and I even recommend it to friends. I am starting to think maybe I shouldn't though, because it is obvious:

Flock is now based on Chromium

Filed under
Software
  • Flock is now based on Chromium instead of Firefox
  • Flock 3 Beta drops Firefox, switches to Chromium
  • New Flock divorces Firefox, snuggles up to Chrome

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KDE and the Masters of the Universe – 2010-06-15
  • OpenCL 1.1 Specification Released
  • Red Hat Summit: Even Microsoft Will Lend a Virtualization Hand
  • 'Appleseed' Open Source Alternative to Facebook Gathers Steam
  • Why Learn Linux at All
  • Red Hat Provides Snapshot Into Red Hat Summit
  • Geek Of The Week: Larry Ellison
  • Java father Gosling backs managed runtime gallop
  • More thoughts on FSF action against Apple over GNU Go
  • FOSS Compliance: What Are the Basics You Must Know?
  • Find a community's cheeseheads when not wearing foam hats
  • How does Ubuntu do it?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Backing up with Deja Dup
  • Linux rename user command
  • Writing Better Shell Scripts – Part 1
  • Understand at, atq, atrm, batch Commands using 9 Examples
  • How to Assign a Static IP to an Ubuntu 10.04 Desktop Computer
  • cppcheck - A tool for static C / C++ code analysis
  • font tip
  • Learn more about how you can use SQLite
  • Tuning MySql with MySqlTuner to increase efficiency and performance
  • Weird Gnome Panel Behavior

Ubuntu Netbook Edition (Remix) not just for netbooks?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Netbook Edition (formally netbook remix) is a collection of applications that make Ubuntu more usable on smaller screens. But you don't have to be running a netbook to benefit. This article looks at how to use the best netbook remix features in a standard Ubuntu 10.04 install.

AWN 4 is fine

Filed under
Software

gnulinuxuser.wordpress: Occasionally I decide that someone has made such an impressive application that I have to give it its own review. This is one of those times.

The Desktop PC Is *NEVER* Going Away. Period.

penguinpetes.com: I don't know why the electronics industry as a whole is in such a rush to declare the desktop PC dead. You could of course make the first assumption that they want to sell more handheld gadgets to fill the void, but really they make money from selling PCs too, you know.

A Fatal Flaw For Open Source

Filed under
OSS
  • A Fatal Flaw For Open Source
  • Does Open Source Suffer From A Glass Ceiling?
  • Open Source Software Company Joins Forces with ForgeRock
  • Ready For Open Source WAN Acceleration?
  • How Open Source Can Lead to Improved Management of Customer Data
  • Open Source Software Gaining Acceptance
  • Brazil and India: The Next Generation of Open Source
  • The open source tea party

Anti-FSF stance caused ACCESS to pull Gnome Foundation Funding

Filed under
OSS

pwnage.ca: Xavier Bestel had made a comment to a gnome member regarding their choice of OS and E-mail client. The person promptly fired back with an anti software freedom tirade and blurted out insider info from ACCESS as to why they pulled out on funding.

Linux User? 7 Good Reasons to Go Back to Windows

Filed under
Humor

mandrivachronicles.blogspot: With all this craze about morphing penguins that become African lynxes, French stars, green leaves from Ireland, German chameleons, Argentinean fireflies, and even American...ur... Allow me to present those wayward children 7 good reasons to come back from that Tuxlight Zone to the embracing, always-forgiving community of Redmond!

Firefox 4 sneak peek flaunts Google open video codec

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla has turned out a Firefox 4 prototype that includes Google's newly open sourced WebM video format, while Opera has rolled the format into a developer build of its own.

KDE at SouthEast LinuxFest

Filed under
Linux
  • KDE at SouthEast LinuxFest
  • SouthEast LinuxFest Part II
  • Gentoo at LinuxTag 2010: A look back
  • systemd Slides from LinuxTag 2010
  • LinuxTag from my view

Using Gnome-Shell

Filed under
Software

g33q.co.za: Okay, day one, I have a feeling of trepidation – using a beta product for doing real work is risky. I realize I do this at my own risk, and SAVE OFTEN.

Tuxmachines' Fund Raiser

Time has come to ask tuxmachines visitors to reach into their hearts and pockets to contribute to the best Linux news site on the web. Tuxmachines is in real danger of going dark as I type this.

5 Best Linux Software Packages for Kids

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Even when computers were first being introduced, engineers realized how useful they could be to teach children. Today we’ve gathered together some of the best Linux software applications for kids.

More Free and Open Source Video Editors for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: I would like to feature some more video editing software, which are all capable of handling video sequence editing and provide tools for trimming, colour manipulation, titling, visual effects, splicing, cutting and arranging clips across the timeline among others.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal
    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.
  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux
    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.
  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms
    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on. Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.
  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively
    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’. The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS. The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes
    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes. If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!
  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland
    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor. Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.
  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD
    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release. In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis
    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.
  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora
    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May. The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem. Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.