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Tuesday, 19 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Does Ubuntu Make Linux Look Bad?

Filed under
Ubuntu

robinzrants.wordpress: On one of the computer forums I visit, someone has suggested that Ubuntu Linux “makes Linux look bad.”

openSUSE 11.2… the day after.

Filed under
SUSE

linux.eregion.de: So now it’s been a few weeks since openSUSE 11.2 hit the street. Here are a few impressions / factoids that i discovered so far:

Kernel Sandbox

Filed under
Linux

kdubois.net: Kernel coding is a bit of a pain, if you compare it to userspace coding. You loose a lot of nice things in userspace, like segfaults (think you can’t live with them? try living without them Wink ), and a bad kernel build can easily stop a system cold. These stupid little annoyances can really stop beginners from getting involved!

e-Book Collection Management on Linux

Filed under
Software

penguininside.blogspot: Having trouble sorting out hundreds of e-Books? If the collection is too big, its really not friendlier to find a book by file name. We need something like Book Shelf to keep them in order, that is what e-Book Collection Managers are, but they are a lot flexible than our real life Book Shelves.

The Backflip: Motorola's Innovative Android Phone

junauza.com: Motorola just launched its third Android-powered smartphone with a name that describes its unique characteristic. --The Backflip.

On the road again with Mandriva 2010 Spring Alpha1

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: Mandriva team wishes you happy new year 2010 and is proud to propose the first alpha release for 2010 Spring. Together with these isos, you will find also technical specifications for this coming release.

BSD Magazine goes free

Filed under
BSD

freebsdnews.net: We are happy to announce that BSD Magazine is transforming into a free monthly online publication. The online version of BSD Magazine will stay in the same quality and form.

The rise of web applications and Chrome: it's all about timescales

Filed under
Web

The significant thing about Chrome is that it sets a new way of thinking. It does not mean Chrome will dominate the world. Open standards mean that other companies could provide similar services.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • 6 Steps for Minimal Ubuntu Installation Using debootstrap
  • Setting Full Duplex mode Ethernet Interface
  • Automate Backups With Back In Time
  • New Gloobus And CoverGloobus Sneaky Peeks
  • VT4 using Drupal
  • Why FOSS should not fear M&A by proprietary vendors
  • On Selling Exceptions to the GNU GPL
  • Inkscape Class Day 1
  • Single instance apps using D-Bus
  • Life with Linux: Another week of work
  • X Server 1.7.4 Released
  • Possible solutions to Fix the Missing Network Manager Icon in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Binutils Porting Guide To A New Target Architecture
  • Mastering a DVD using QDVDAuthor
  • ASUS Eee PC 1201N Netbook On Linux Update
  • Mount Windows partition automatically using PySDM
  • Fairy Linux Progress Report
  • Make your Linux netbook battery last longer
  • YouTube Videos with Linux: Part 2
  • License Change at Novell Adds Confusion

10 Characteristics of a Linux Guru?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: I just read a post on another site from someone who calls himself (herself?), linux guru, and it made me ponder the following question: What is a Linux Guru?

40% Firefox Growth in 2009

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • 40% Firefox Growth in 2009
  • Is Firefox’s position vulnerable in 2010?

An API for easy Linux virtualization

Filed under
Linux

The libvirt library is a Linux API over the virtualization capabilities of Linux that supports a variety of hypervisors, including Xen and KVM, as well as QEMU and some virtualization products for other operating systems. This article explores libvirt, its use, and its architecture.

openSUSE KDE 4 Repositories Explained

Filed under
SUSE

benkevan.com/blog: Thanks to Tejas Guruswamy for a very good write up on build service repositories for KDE.

Will the Linux-Windows Netbook Change the OS Wars?

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Back in June, when I wrote an opinion piece about the enduring competition between the three major operating systems, I assumed the race would just go on indefinitely. But in a brilliant stroke of diplomatic ingenuity, Lenovo brought to the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas a single hybrid laptop in which Windows 7 and Lenovo's custom form of Linux.

Pino, a Simple Twitter Client for Linux

Filed under
Software

learningubuntu.com: Even though in the world of Twitter there are a lot of fantastic, feature-full programs for the Twitter power user, that's not exactly what I, a simple Twitter user, is looking for.

Novell lose Open Source CTSO as Nat Friedman leaves

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: Nat Friedman, co-founder of Ximian and Chief Technology and Strategy Officer for Open Source at Novell has announced in a blog posting that he has quit.

Fedora Project Board Starts into 2010

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: The project chair has appointed Red Hat employee Colin Walters to the board. John Poelstra begins the year with open feedback to the board's work.

The best Linux desktop search tools

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: We picked out the best desktop search tools for Linux and put them through their paces - read on to find out how they fared!

some words about Slackware

Filed under
Slack

mysticalgr.awardspace: some guys over at TechCrunch UK (or something like that) made a review of 8 linux distributions which ships KDE as their default graphical desktop. the first one? Slackware…

KDE 4.4 Release Candidate 1 Available

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: KDE has made the first release candidate of the KDE Software Compilation 4.4 available. The first KDE SC release (albeit not a stable one) is the first release candidate for the upcoming KDE Software Compilation 4.4.0 which will be released on February 9th.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly
    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update. We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.
  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched
    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8. The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

Wikileaks Releases Spy Files Russia, CCleaner Infected, Equifax Has a Dirty Little Secret

  • Spy Files Russia
    This publication continues WikiLeaks' Spy Files series with releases about surveillance contractors in Russia. While the surveillance of communication traffic is a global phenomena, the legal and technological framework of its operation is different for each country. Russia's laws - especially the new Yarovaya Law - make literally no distinction between Lawful Interception and mass surveillance by state intelligence authorities (SIAs) without court orders. Russian communication providers are required by Russian law to install the so-called SORM ( Система Оперативно-Розыскных Мероприятий) components for surveillance provided by the FSB at their own expense. The SORM infrastructure is developed and deployed in Russia with close cooperation between the FSB, the Interior Ministry of Russia and Russian surveillance contractors.
  • Malware-Infected CCleaner Installer Distributed to Users Via Official Servers for a Month
    Hackers have managed to embed malware into the installer of CCleaner, a popular Windows system optimization tool with over 2 billion downloads to date. The rogue package was distributed through official channels for almost a month. CCleaner is a utilities program that is used to delete temporary internet files such as cookies, empty the Recycling Bin, correct problems with the Windows Registry, among other tasks. First released in 2003, it has become hugely popular; up to 20 million people download it per month. Users who downloaded and installed CCleaner or CCleaner Cloud between Aug. 15 and Sept. 12 should scan their computers for malware and update their apps. The 32-bit versions of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected.
  • Equifax Suffered a Hack [sic] Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed
  • This is why you shouldn’t use texts for two-factor authentication

    For a long time, security experts have warned that text messages are vulnerable to hijacking — and this morning, they showed what it looks like in practice.

Amazon Changes Rental ('Cloud') Model on GNU/Linux

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC
    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.
  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen
    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.
  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD
    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.
  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years
    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.