Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 04 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Back up Linux with ease

Filed under
HowTos

tectonic.co.za: I’m not particularly fond of backing up my data. I know I should do it and I feel pretty smug when it is done, but it is a time-consuming and frustrating process. I want is a one-click backup tool that, once set, does all the work for me. Backerupper may not be TimeMachine but it is pretty idiot-proof and does the job.

Review: Nokia N810 Internet Tablet

Filed under
Hardware

vnunet.com: The problem with pocket-sized internet gadgets (such as smartphones) is that the web facilities they offer tend to be patchy. This is no good to serious web users, who yearn for a portable internet experience that’s the same the one you get sat at a desktop PC. Nokia’s new N810 promises precisely this.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 243

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature story: Entropy - a new package management toolkit for Sabayon Linux

  • News: What's new in Mandriva Linux, Fedora Xfce spin updates, OpenBSD pre-release testing, free download of YDL 6.0
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 4.0 "KDE", Kiwi Linux 8.03
  • Upcoming releases: Gentoo Linux 2008.0 Beta, Frugalware 0.8
  • Data mining: Data-peeler analysis of DistroWatch Page Hit Ranking logs
  • New addition: Ophcrack LiveCD
  • New distribution: PA-RISC Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

few howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Sync Amarok With iPOD Classic & 3rd Generation iPOD Nano

  • Ubuntu/XP: Streaming Sopcast to your mobile devices
  • Recording sounds for Impress slides with eVoice
  • Debian amd64: iceweasel with i386 plugins, outside a chroot
  • Redirecting Ports Using iptables Prerouting
  • Fix for suspend and hibernation problem for Laptops

Martin Buckley quits Novell over "certain principles"

Filed under
SUSE

Matt Asay: Wow. Martin Buckley, long time product manager and global evangelist for Novell's Systems and Resource Management products (e.g., ZENworks), has quit Novell.

Amarok 2 feature freeze planned for later this month

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The Amarok developers have been working on a major overhaul that will dramatically reinvent the program's user interface and deliver a lot of really compelling new features. The new theme looks very polished and will likely blend well with a KDE 4 environment.

MSI Shows Off Eee PC Competitor

Filed under
Hardware

gizmodo.com.au: At CeBIT, it is showing off the MSI Wind, a subnotebook very much in the style of the Eee. The 8-inch model is expected to cost less than 400 euros and it will come with either Linux or Windows installed.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Me and You and a GPG Key Named Boo

  • Downloading Music the 1337 Way!
  • Timeline of the Debian project
  • Configure Exim with anti-spam
  • FSF New Website and Newsletter
  • A “Word” on Document Interoperability
  • Decibel in 14 easy steps
  • an interview with pmdematagoda
  • Will it always be about Microsoft?
  • People power transforms the web in next online revolution
  • Linux a few months in
  • Linux Mint Darnya on HP Pavilion dv6000

Eee PC to Get Intel’s Diamondville, Hard Drives, and Fashion Forward Style

Filed under
Hardware
Interviews

laptopmag.com: Asus’ Eee PC has become a low-cost laptop to reckon with. Everex has snuck up on the low-cost leader with the CloudBook and other vendors are rumored to be releasing their own low-cost notebooks in the near future. Shen thinks the days of the Eee PC are just taking off and that the competitors will try to knock them off their course but won’t succeed.

Linux Filesystem Exposed

Filed under
Linux

gorkee.com: On Linux, there is only a single hierarchical directory structure. Everything starts from the root directory, represented by ‘/’, and then expands into sub-directories. Where DOS/Windows had various partitions and then directories under these partitions, Linux places all the partitions under the root directory by ‘mounting’ them under specific directories. The closest to root under Windows would be c:.

Talking Ubuntu Linux: Q&A with System76 President Carl Richell

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

allaboutubuntu.wordpress: System76, one of the best-known providers of Ubuntu systems, recently introduced new servers certified to run the operating system. All About Ubuntu caught up with System76 President Carl Richell to discuss his views on the Ubuntu server market.

Plasma improvements: KDE 4.0.2 and beyond

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: When KDE 4.0 was officially released in January, there were a lot of gaping holes in basic functionality. During the past few months, the codebase has matured considerably and the environment is steadily approaching the point where it will be sufficiently robust for widespread day-to-day use.

IBM brings 'Microsoft-free' PCs to Europe

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com.au: In a move to challenge Microsoft on the desktop, IBM has teamed up with Austrian and Polish system integrators to supply the emerging Eastern European and Russian business PC markets with "Microsoft-free" systems based on Red Hat Linux and open standards-based productivity software.

Mainstream U.S. Media Discovers Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy was flipping though his Sunday morning paper when he spotted an article about Ubuntu Linux. He took a few more sips of coffee to perk up and make sure his eyes weren’t deceiving him. Sure enough, Ubuntu had made the leap into the mainstream media.

Why I am Making the Switch from Gentoo to Kubuntu

Filed under
Gentoo

evildomain.org: I am an advocate of Gentoo. Linux ricer? Sure, why not, I live for those minute speed advantages. I also, perhaps masochistically, prefer building every package from source. Why, then, am I dumping Gentoo, and for kubuntu of all distros?

Also: Bye Gentoo... Welcome Ubuntu

Be the next big thing in open source

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: So you’ve got an idea for a great app and you’re thinking of making your own open source project? Here are some items to consider and some sites that will help you on your journey. We’ll also see how some well-known open source teams did it.

Mandriva 2008 Spring - RC1

Filed under
MDV

planetoss.com: Mandriva was the first distribution I used back in 2001 when I started using Linux. Mandriva's earlier decisions like releasing their OS to the public after a month or so and some annoying bugs made me to stay out of Mandriva but recently I tried Mandriva's 2008 release and was really impressed with their work.

Coupla gaming releases

Filed under
Gaming

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu TIP: Extending Nautilus, Scripting Your Way To UI Bliss

  • Terminator - Multiple GNOME terminals in one window
  • Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron Brings Better MTP Support
  • Conky on Ubuntu 64 Bit - conkyrc
  • Restoring GRUB boot menu from ubuntu live CD
  • Ubuntu Studio Theme a cool looking theme for your Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon 7.10
  • Watching live soccer in Gentoo - part 1 - SopCast

Laptop Review: Dell XPS m1330n (Ubuntu Pre-Installed)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

adventuresinopensource: I finally got my shiny new Dell XPS m1330 laptop recently and I have to say I really love it. It's very nice to be able to order a new laptop from a large manufacturer with Linux pre-installed, especially as a home user, it's been an easier option for enterprise customers for a while now I think.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

CoreOS Linux 899.17.0 Released with OpenSSL 1.0.2h, NTPd 4.2.8p7, and Git 2.7.3

The CoreOS developers have released a new version of the Linux kernel-based operating system engineered for massive server deployments, CoreOS 899.17.0. Powered by Linux kernel 4.3.6, CoreOS 899.17.0 arrived on May 3, 2016, as an upgrade to the previous release of the GNU/Linux operating system, which system administrators can use for creating and maintaining open-source projects for Linux Containers, version 899.15.0. Read more

Black Lab Brings Real-Time Kernel Patching to Its Enterprise Desktop 8 Linux OS

A few moments ago, Softpedia has been informed by Black Lab Software about the general availability of the sixth DP (Developer Preview) build of the upcoming Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 OS. Sporting a new kernel from the Linux kernel from the 4.2 series, Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 Developer Preview 6 arrives today for early adopters and public beta testers with real-time kernel patching, which means that you won't have to reboot your Black Lab Linux Enterprise OS after kernel upgrades. "DP6 offers you a window into what's new and whats coming when Black Lab Enterprise Desktop and Black Lab Enterprise Desktop for Education is released. As with our other developer previews it also aids in porting your applications to the new environment," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO, Black Lab Software. Read more

USB stick brings neural computing functions to devices

Movidius unveiled a “Fathom” USB stick and software framework for integrating accelerated neural networking processing into embedded and mobile devices. On April 28, Movidius announced availability of the USB-interfaced “Fathom Neural Compute Stick,” along with an underlying Fathom deep learning software framework. The device is billed as “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator,” capable of allowing “powerful neural networks to be moved out of the cloud, and deployed natively in end-user devices.” Read more

ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk

  • Open Source ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk
    ImageMagick, an open source suite of tools for working with graphic images used by a large number of websites, has been found to contain a serious security vulnerability that puts sites using the software at risk for malicious code to be executed onsite. Security experts consider exploitation to be so easy they’re calling it “trivial,” and exploits are already circulating in the wild. The biggest risk is to sites that allows users to upload their own image files. Information about the vulnerability was made public Tuesday afternoon by Ryan Huber, a developer and security researcher, who wrote that he had little choice but to post about the exploit.
  • Huge number of sites imperiled by critical image-processing vulnerability
    A large number of websites are vulnerable to a simple attack that allows hackers to execute malicious code hidden inside booby-trapped images. The vulnerability resides in ImageMagick, a widely used image-processing library that's supported by PHP, Ruby, NodeJS, Python, and about a dozen other languages. Many social media and blogging sites, as well as a large number of content management systems, directly or indirectly rely on ImageMagick-based processing so they can resize images uploaded by end users.
  • Extreme photo-bombing: Bad ImageMagick bug puts countless websites at risk of hijacking
    A wildly popular software tool used by websites to process people's photos can be exploited to execute malicious code on servers and leak server-side files. Security bugs in the software are apparently being exploited in the wild right now to compromise at-risk systems. Patches to address the vulnerabilities are available in the latest source code – but are incomplete and have not been officially released, we're told.