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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Richard Stallman on How He Started GNU Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 10:15am
Story Team Tiny Core is pleased to announce the release of Core v5.2 Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 9:46am
Story Call for votes on default Linux init system for jessie Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 9:38am
Story Site Migration Imminent (Updatex6) Roy Schestowitz 5 27/01/2014 - 9:36am
Story Samsung, Google sign patent deal Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 9:21am
Story Steam Machines 'a big step forward for strategy in the living room' Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 11:08pm
Story IBM Shows That Collaborations With the NSA Are a Company’s Death Knell Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 10:25pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 8:01pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 4:13pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 4:10pm

what does a "KDE app" mean?

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Pet peeve #47: Assuming that "a KDE app" means "you have to be logged into KDE to use it". We run into this misconception fairly regularly and it's time for a re-think.

Chrome fades as users return to IE, Firefox

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: Chrome's share of the browser market is fading as users who abandoned Internet Explorer and Firefox start to return, an Internet measurement company said today.

Let's Move FOSS to Its Logical Conclusion

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: A commenter on one of my articles recently asked: "Why is it that true believers feel the need to replace every last proprietary app?" He continued: "VMware, Skype, and Google Earth are best-of-breed and free-as-in-beer." Over the last year or two, such sentiments -- often rudely expressed -- have become increasingly common.

Upcoming Factory Changes (openSUSE)

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE Factory distribution is our permanent moving target, this is the place where all Alpha and Beta versions are mastered from. We are currently in the process of adjusting some things due to the move from SUSE internal AutoBuild to openSUSE Build Service:

Adobe Answers to Linux Development Questions

Filed under
Software
Interviews

blog.eracc.com: One of the prior articles here dealt with the ease of installation of Adobe Reader on Linux. The first comment to that article speculated on Linux development being a “pain” even for Adobe. So, I contacted Adobe. I received a nice reply from Kelly Murphy at that organization.

Further recommended slip of Beta, and Fedora 10 schedule

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: After a week(end) of hacking, we're just not there yet for Beta. The Release Engineering team is recommending a slip of the Beta release date to Tuesday Sept 30th, , which would put the Fedora 10 release date at November 25th.

Compiz Fusion 0.7.8 released

Filed under
Software

compiz-fusion.org: This is the fourth development release of Compiz Fusion 0.7 series, which will be the basis for the stable 0.8.0 release. This release, based on Compiz 0.7.8, brings the usual translations updates and bug fixes plus some work on kde4 integration and a lot of improvement to animations plugin.

Sapphire Radeon HD 4670 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Earlier this month the ATI Radeon HD 4600 series from AMD was unveiled as the new mid-range graphics cards derived from their flagship RV770 graphics core. The Radeon HD 4650 and Radeon HD 4670 are the two RV730-based products now available. The ATI Radeon HD 4670 may not be able to compete with the Radeon HD 4800 series in all of the tests, but at a price of under $100 USD is it worth pursuing?

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Pidgin NoSound Solution

  • Emergency Booting RedHat Linux With USB
  • Finding log files X number of days old and deleteing them
  • How to add KDE to Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1
  • Fwknopping your way to success with Single Packet Authorisation

A new version of AmigaOS

Filed under
OS

arstechnica.com: From its very inception, the Amiga has been about defying conventional wisdom. Sadly, these days the Amiga is no longer breaking new ground technologically. However, the platform continues to defy conventional wisdom.

Gentoo: New release strategy to provide more current install media

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org: In future releases, Gentoo will focus on a more back-to-basics approach that will give you up-to-date install media on a regular basis and make much better use of our human resources. Consequently, we're canceling the 2008.1 release.

Wubi Tuesday

Filed under
Ubuntu

itpro.co.uk/blogs: I have a sneaking feeling that after having done all that back in the days of the 0.8 kernel and with more than a handful of Gentoo installs, I really should I be feeling a little guilty as to just how easy it was to get a dual-boot Linux install working on my main desktop PC.

Few tips for selecting the best Linux apps

Filed under
Software

cyberciti.biz: GNU/Linux and open source software offers lots of choices to end users. This can create a problem for new users. Most Linux distributions provide a program for browsing a list of thousands of free software applications that have already been tested.

Umit, the graphical network scanner

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: Umit is a user-friendly graphical interface to Nmap that lets you perform network port scanning. The utility's most useful features are its stored scan profiles and the ability to search and compare saved network scans.

Get some attitude for aptitude

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Many times when looking around the internet for the rare program that is not in the repository. Or even if you want a newer version of a program that is in the repository. You will find that some sites have pre-prepared binary packages which can be downloaded and installed.

Viewing the Night Sky with Linux, Part III: Stellarium and Celestia

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Parts I and II of this series covered covered the "planetarium" programs KStars and XEphem. They can answer pretty much any question about what's where and when in the night sky. But they don't really give you the feeling of being there like a couple of newer entries on the Linux astronomy scene: Stellarium and Celestia.

CME Group joins Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

finextra.com: Derivatives exchange operator CME Group has joined the Linux Foundation, with its associate director Vinod Kutty taking on the chair of the organisation's end user council.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Eee PC: Xandros Vs Eee-ubuntu

  • Gentoo: Improve boot time…
  • Microsoft, Mozilla, Google Talk Browser Futures
  • IBM Lotus Symphony: The Ubuntu Beta
  • The command line is nothing to be afraid of
  • 13 Terminal Emulators for Linux
  • VirtualBox update brings improved performance and 64-bit support
  • Linux Foundation courts individual members
  • Year One with the Linux Based NAS Server
  • KDE 4 drawing performance on nvidia
  • Linux Plumbers Conf: Linus - Git Tutorial
  • Just switched to the Paludis package manager
  • linux-0.01 on Ubuntu
  • OpenSUSE 11 First Impressions
  • Fraught laptop project takes aim at digital divide and poverty
  • ReiserFS File System Corruption and Linux Recovery
  • Linux Outlaws 56 - Have You Had Your Eyes Tested Lately?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reset Your Forgotten Ubuntu Password in 2 Minutes or Less

  • Installing Real Player and Configuring Mozilla Plugin
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 2
  • Basic APT commands
  • Install VirtualBox 2 Guest Additions in Ubuntu
  • Charting your boot processes with bootchart
  • How To: Increase Battery Life in Ubuntu or Debian Linux
  • Running CrossOver Chromium aka "Google Chrome" under Ubuntu
  • Changing what time a process thinks it is with libfaketime

OS stuff (opensuse, ubuntu, windows)

Filed under
OS
  • openSUSE Build Service built openSUSE 11.1 beta 1

  • openSUSE 11.1 beta 1 e1000e driver issue
  • Short Blog on openSUSE
  • What’s Red Hat Doing in the Virtualization Business?
  • Oops! Ubuntu IS gearing up for more kernel contribution

  • Ubuntu loses its virginity, turns commercial
  • Widening Canonical's Commercial Software Pipeline
  • Ubuntu Ibex Alpha 6 Review
  • More Windows 7 M3 Screenshots Leaked

  • Microsoft refers to its anti-Linux playbook to attack VMware
  • Windows 7 versus Generic Linux Distro
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