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Saturday, 26 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story UK To Adopt Open Source Office "GovOffice" Based On LibreOffice Mohd Sohail 30/10/2015 - 2:36pm
Story [SOLVED] Adobe Bracket Is Not Installing In Ubuntu 15.10 Due To Missing Dependency "Libgcrypt11" Mohd Sohail 30/10/2015 - 2:32pm
Story PrisonPC: How Linux plays a useful role behind bars Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 2:29pm
Story Red Hat News (Financial) Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 2:17pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 2:15pm
Story RapidDisk / RapidCache 3.5 now available. pkoutoupis 30/10/2015 - 2:02pm
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 Update to Launch on November 18 Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 11:18am
Story Open source intelligence techniques and the Dark Web Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 11:08am
Story Linux Mint History and Development Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 10:53am
Story Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Stefan Sperling Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 10:13am

My Top Five Favorite Distributions for 2010

Filed under
Linux
MDV
SUSE

ostatic.com: Ms. Carla Schroder shared a list of her "bestest distros" recently, so I thought I might follow suit. She called hers "not-usual" and looking at her list, I'd say my choices are probably a little more usual. In any case, here are my top five.

PCLinuxOS 2010.12 Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

unixmen.com: PCLinuxOS 2010.12 holiday CDs are now available for KDE, GNOME, LXDE, Xfce and Enlightenment desktops featuring the latest updates from the PCLinuxOS software repository. Here are some screenshots from PCLinuxOS 2010.12 Live CD:

A Quick Glance at Mandriva 2010.2

Filed under
MDV

mandrivachronicles.blogspot: As I was updating my Mandriva Spring PowerPack, I noticed that it asked me whether or not I wanted to get version 2010.2 packages. I was a bit surprised because Mandriva promised to release that version. YES, MANDRIVA 2010.2 IS HERE!

Introduction to Linux Command-Line for Beginners

Filed under
HowTos

The guide aims first-time users and average Linux users and its goal is to make you learn your way around when using the Linux command-line interface (or CLI for short). It also encourages some habits which I believe that, although hard to learn at first, will make you more productive later on.

10 Last-Minute Gift Ideas For Linux Geeks

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: It may be better to give than it is to receive, but that doesn't mean geeks the world over don't have virtual sugarplums dancing through their heads.

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 14 Server

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 14 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.

Wingpanel – elementary’s slick new space-saving panel

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: WingPanel is a new ‘space-saving top panel’ created by, you’ve guessed it, the elementary team.

An Exclusive Preview Of Unigine's OilRush Game

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: OilRush is being released in March of 2011, but we have secured an internal development build of this strategy game to offer you the very first and exclusive preview with a number of screenshots.

Also: Zero Ballistics 2.0 For Linux Finally Released

A Guide to Wine on Ubuntu for Beginners

Filed under
HowTos

Wine is a compatibility layer which allows Windows applications to run on Linux by translating Windows system calls into native Linux calls. Wine runs successfully a variety of Windows applications and games on Linux - the official website offers an application database which organizes those depending on how well they perform under Wine, known issues and solutions, screenshots and helpful comments.

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Humble Indie Bundle #2 Just Made One Million Bucks
  • This Ubuntu Software Centre mock-up is bright but bold
  • Follow-up to “Shy Developer Syndrome”
  • Holiday Surprise: What's On My Linux Gaming Desktop?
  • Difference between Planned and Actual work on Internet
  • User Familiarity != Software Superiority
  • Expect heavy breakage for Cooker 2010.1
  • Basket Note Pads - The best scribble pad/note application
  • Kinect Competitor To Bring Gesture Control To Linux
  • Tux Paint – Simple Drawing Program for Young Children
  • Fedora needs an architect (part 2)
  • Fuduntu 14.7-2 improvements
  • Natty update puts window controls back in the panel, app menu changes
  • Diaspora
  • Munich’s Migration to GNU/Linux Grinds Onward
  • Full Circle Podcast 14

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create an ssh key with Seahorse
  • CADuntu (2D CAD Drawing Tool) Becomes LibreCAD, Gets Ubuntu PPA
  • How to Open/Extract RAR files in Ubuntu Linux
  • Eva's Great Guide to Ubuntu – Part 5
  • Deleting Files with KDE's Dolphin
  • Enabling Ubuntu’s ctrl-alt-backspace X server reset
  • Some more CLI resources

XBMC 10.0 Officially Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Just as expected, XBMC 10.0 "Dharma" has been officially released. New features of XBMC 10 include a unified add-on framework and a lot of features related to this work for providing new functionality.

Bank of America Rep Responds To No Linux Support

Filed under
Linux

linuxlock.blogspot: This isn't exactly fresh news but I think some of you might find this interesting. . The Bank of America is a Silver member of The Linux Foundation. Tim Golden -- Senior vice president at Bank of America Sits on the Linux Foundation Board of Directors.

Faster Linux World domination – User mode

Filed under
Linux

keithcu.com: One year ago, I wrote you guys an email summarizing my findings on the key issues for Linux world domination. After thinking about it more, I would like to expand on a couple of the most important ideas from my previous mail.

PCLinuxOS 2010.12 Holiday CD's available

Filed under
News

We uploaded some freshly baked ISOS for PCLinuxOS to the repositories. They are gui hot and delicious. PCLinuxOS 2010.12 holiday CDs are now available for KDE 4, Gnome, LXDE, XFCE and Enlightenment desktops featuring the latest updates from the PCLinuxOS software repository. All CD features kernel 2.6.33.7bfs kernel for maximum desktop performance. Nvidia and ATI fglrx driver support.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 154 is out

Filed under
SUSE

Jolicloud 1.1 - Very good, but impolite

dedoimedo.com: A few things have changed since my last Jolicloud review. One, Chrome OS was released into the wild. Moblin became MeeGo. Cloud became the rage of the modern society. Most importantly, Jolicloud is no longer Atom-only.

Humble Bundle #2 Breaches $900k, On Way To $1M USD

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: While this unique game offering has just been going on for three days, the developers have already raked in more than $900,000 USD. At the time of writing they have banked away $911,134.35 and it looks like over the weekend they should exceed $1 million USD.

Developer defends claims of backdoors in OpenBSD

Filed under
Security
BSD

itwire.com: Perry, chief executive of a company named GoVirtual, told iTWire: "I have absolutely, positively nothing to gain from making those statements to Theo, and only did so to encourage a source code audit of the OpenBSD Project. If I had this to do over again, I would have sent an anonymous postcard to WikiLeaks.

OpenIndiana development release oi_148 hit public, download available

Filed under
OS

techonia.com: OpenIndiana Project Team announced the next development release of OpenIndiana operating system to oi_148.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland, Radeon, Mir, Vulkan

  • Igalia Continues Working On Wayland & Accelerated Media Decode In Chromium On Linux
    Months ago we had reported on Igalia's efforts for improving hardware video/media acceleration on the Chromium browser stack for Linux and getting Chromium ready for Wayland but it's been relatively quiet since then with no status updates. Fortunately, a Phoronix reader pointed to a fresh round of ongoing work in this space. Igalia is working on supporting the V4L2 VDA (Video Decode Acceleration) on the Linux desktop for video/image decode of H.264, VP8, VP9, etc. Up to now the V4L2 VDA support was just used on ARM and under Chrome OS. This is part of the consulting firm's work on delivering first-rate Wayland support for Chromium -- it's a task they have been working on for quite some time.
  • Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2 Released With RenderDoc Interoperability
    AMD's GPUOpen group has announced the release of Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2, it's open-source GPU performance profiler. What's significant about this release is initial interoperability with the popular RenderDoc debugger. Beginning with Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2, there is beta support for allowing a profile be triggered from RenderDoc and for displaying data across the opposite tool along with synchronization between the two utilities.
  • Mir Is Running On Arch Linux; Mir Also Progressing With EGLStreams Support
    Prominent Mir developer Alan Griffiths of Canonical has published his latest weekly update on the status of this Linux display server that continues working on supporting Wayland clients. First up, via the UBports community, Mir is now working on Arch Linux after some basic changes and packaging work. So similar to Ubuntu and Fedora and others, it's now easy to run Mir on Arch Linux if so desired.
  • VK9 - Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan - Hits 26th Milestone
    It's been a wild week for the various Direct3D-over-Vulkan projects with VKD3D 1.0 being released for the initial Direct3D 12 over Vulkan bits from the ongoing work in the Wine project to DXVK continuing to get better at its D3D11-over-VLK support. There's also an update on the VK9 front.
  • Wine-Staging 3.9 Fixes D3D 10/11 Gaming Performance Regressions
    One day after the exciting Wine 3.9 update with VKD3D work and more, the Wine-Staging code has been updated against this latest development release. While since the revival of Wine-Staging earlier this year there has been more than 900 out-of-tree/experimental patches against this Wine branch, with Wine-Staging 3.9 that patch count comes in at 895 patches. It's great to see with more of the changes working their way into upstream Wine after being vetted while other patches are no longer relevant. Also decided this week is that Wine-Staging developers will rely upon the WineHQ bug infrastructure for handling the submission of new Wine-Staging patches so that the work is much easier to track by users/developers in seeing the status and background on proposed patches for the staging tree.

Security: The Microsoft Cyber Attack, VPNFilter, Compliance, Docker

  • « The Microsoft Cyber Attack » : a German Documentary from the ARD on Relations Between Microsoft and Public Administration Now Available in English

    On February 19th, 2018, the German public broadcaster (ARD) aired a documentary on Microsoft relations with public administrations. Part of the inquiry is about the Open Bar agreement between Microsoft and the French ministry of Defense, including interviews of French Senator Joëlle Garriaud-Maylam, Leïla Miñano, a journalist, and Étienne Gonnu of April.

    The documentary is now available in English thanks to Deutsche Welle (DW), the German public international broadcaster, on its Youtube channel dedicated to documentaries : The Microsoft Cyber Attack. It should be noted that April considers itself as a Free software advocate, rather than open source, as the voice-over suggests.

  • VPNFilter UNIX Trojan – How to Remove It and Protect Your Network
    This article has been created to explain what exactly is the VPNFilter malware and how to secure your network against this massive infection by protecting your router as well as protecting your computers. A new malware, going by the name of VPNFilter has reportedly infected over 500 thousand router devices across most widely used brands such as Linksys, MikroTik, NETGEAR as well as TP-Link, mostly used in homes and offices. The cyber-sec researchers at Cisco Talos have reported that the threat is real and it is live, even thought the infected devices are under investigation at the moment. The malware reportedly has something to do with the BlackEnergy malware, which targeted multiple devices in Ukraine and Industrial Control Systems in the U.S.. If you want to learn more about the VPNFilter malware and learn how you can remove it from your network plus protect your network, we advise that you read this article.
  • FBI: Reboot Your Router Now To Fight Malware That Affected 500,000 Routers
  • Compliance is Not Synonymous With Security
    While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security. Along with the clear benefits to be gained from upholding the standards enforced by GDPR, PCI DSS, HIPAA, and other regulatory bodies often comes a shift toward a more compliance-centric security approach. But regardless of industry or regulatory body, achieving and maintaining compliance should never be the end goal of any security program. Here’s why:
  • Dialing up security for Docker containers
    Docker containers are a convenient way to run almost any service, but admins need to be aware of the need to address some important security issues. Container systems like Docker are a powerful tool for system administrators, but Docker poses some security issues you won't face with a conventional virtual machine (VM) environment. For example, containers have direct access to directories such as /proc, /dev, or /sys, which increases the risk of intrusion. This article offers some tips on how you can enhance the security of your Docker environment.

Programming: Fonts, Jupyter, and Open Source FPGAs

  • 11 Best Programming Fonts
    There are many posts and sites comparing fonts for programming and they are all amazing articles. So why I repeated the same subject here? Since I always found myself lost in dozens of fonts and could not finger out which one was best for me. So today I tried many fonts and picked up the following fonts for you. These fonts are pretty popular and easy to get. And most importantly, all these fonts are FREE!
  • New open-source web apps available for students and faculty
    Jupyter is an open source web environment for writing code and visualizing data. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly popular across a wide range of academic disciplines. [...] JupyterHub is a variation of the Jupyter project, which adds support for user account management and enterprise authentication. The TLT instance allows students and faculty to log in with their credentials for full access to their own Jupyter environment and provides direct access to their Penn State Access Account Storage Space (PASS). Using PASS for storage provided a large persistent storage space that students and faculty were already familiar with and was easily accessible from the local lab systems or their personal devices.
  • An Ultrasound Driver With Open Source FPGAs
    Ultrasound imaging has been around for decades, but Open Source ultrasound has not. While there are a ton of projects out there attempting to create open ultrasound devices, most of this is concentrated on the image-processing side of things, and not the exceptionally difficult problem of pinging a sensor at millions of times a second, listening for the echo, and running that through a very high speed ADC. For his entry into the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is doing just that. He’s building an ultrasound board that’s built around Open Hardware, a fancy Open Source FPGA, and a lot of very difficult signal processing. It also uses some Rick and Morty references, so you know this is going to be popular with the Internet peanut gallery. The design of the ultrasound system is based around an iCE40 FPGA, the only FPGA with an Open Source toolchain. Along with this, there are a ton of ADCs, a DAC, pulsers, and a high voltage section to drive the off-the-shelf ultrasound head. If you’re wondering how this ultrasound board interfaces with the outside world, there’s a header for a Raspberry Pi on there, too, so this project has the requisite amount of blog cred.

today's howtos