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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE Plasma 5 Now Available for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 5:32pm
Story Manjaro Unity Community Edition Is Arch Linux-Based and Powered by Unity Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 5:23pm
Story The Big DRM Graphics Driver Changes Land In Linux 3.18 Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 5:19pm
Story Self-documentation of code Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 5:14pm
Story LXQT 0.8.0 RELEASED WITH FULL QT5 SUPPORT, VARIOUS IMPROVEMENTS Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 5:00pm
Story Can GNOME Make a Comeback? Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 4:27pm
Story Good Karma Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 4:18pm
Story What’s new in the graphics stack in Fedora 21? Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 4:18pm
Story Linux Foundation Initiatives Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 4:10pm
Story Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 Debuts with Support on RHEL 7 Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2014 - 4:09pm

looking to KDE's future

Filed under
KDE

chani.wordpress: the other day there was a group of KDE people in the hall, waiting for the buy ticket guy to return, and ade started asking us to answer questions… things like “describe kde 4.4 in one sentence”… trying to get us to think about where we’re going with KDE and what our goals were. the results were… sad. really sad.

PCLinuxOS Minime 09.1 on my Thinkpad T61

Filed under
PCLOS

temporaryland.wordpress: For the last few months my Thinkpad has been, and still is, the host of several wonderful Linux distributions, all of them based on the new KDE 4 desktop environment. So, today, in mid summer 2009, is there still a reason to run a KDE 3 desktop? Well, if it wasn’t for PCLinuxOS I would have to say no.

10 tips for just installed Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

maxiorel.com: After trying many distributions, I now feel like one of the best, if not the best is Ubuntu. It's clean, and without unnecessary clutter all over the system and on the desktop. The operating system is quite nimble, and runs really well on older machines without the need for new and top of the line equipment. In the following are a few tips on the Ubuntu Linux Operating System.

What open source can learn from Apple

news.cnet.com: Open source's greatest strength may also be its Achilles' heel.

A Possible Future of Linux - Online Live Environments?

terminal-variant.blogspot: Some months ago I casually signed up for a beta program online that seemed to mix cloud computing with Linux distributions. This program being SUSE Studio. SUSE Studio got me thinking. What if the future of building Linux distributions for the casual user could be based on an application like this?

USPS goes open-source with tracking system

Filed under
OSS

gcn.com: If you’ve gone to USPS.com to track and confirm delivery of a letter or package, you’ve used the U.S. Postal Service’s Product Tracking System (PTS) and probably not known it. And you might not have noticed either when USPS moved the system to open source.

openSUSE's Firewall Zone Switcher

Filed under
Software

opensuse.org: So you got that shiny new Netbook, installed Linux on it and carry it along everywhere you go. The default enabled Firewall blocks incoming traffic so you feel safe when connecting to that anonymous WiFi network at your favorite fastfood restaurant.

5 Fast and Lightweight Linux Distros that Chrome OS Should Aspire to Beat

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: After Google Chrome OS was announced and with the promises or goal of making it fast and lightweight, I know it will someday be compared with some of the fastest and lightest Linux distributions that are currently available. So I’m thinking I may never be impressed with Chrome OS if it can't beat or at least be at par with any of these distros:

CrunchBang Linux 9.04.01

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: CrunchBang Linux is based on Ubuntu but it doesn’t use Gnome or KDE for its desktop environment. Instead it used a lightweight window manager called Openbox.

Cloud computing on netbooks — Why?

matija.suklje.name: While in general I agree with both Dion Moult and Christian Weilbach and am in general mistrusting to cloud computing (at least in its currently most popular form), there is something else that bothers me with this hype.

Review: Alien Arena 2009

Filed under
Gaming

raiden.net: Alien Arena is a First Person Shooter (FPS) done in somewhat of a Quake or Unreal Tournament style. The entire game is free, open source, and lots of fun to play.

Linux Knows the Way to Sesame Street

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

linux.com: Sesame Workshop is a non-profit organization with has 40 years worth of digital media over 20 programs distributed to over 120 countries working with over 1000 international partners, almost 50 web sites with manage, and a highly mobile workforce using leased equipment around the world.

10 Things for Linux Desktop Evangelists to Ponder

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: There's always next year, right? If you're eager for the day of the Linux desktop to dawn, and you don't have the patience of a Cubs fan, here are some suggestions for community action that might be worth consideration.

Microsoft aims to price itself into the open source market

Filed under
Microsoft

irishtimes.com: A fair price. What does that mean? If you ask most of us, abruptly, when we’re not expecting an economics exam, we’d say that a fair price is the cost of a good, plus a little on top for profit, writes Danny O'Brien.

Login manager for GNUstep

Filed under
Software

multixden.blogspot: After 7 years and 5 months that it was committed to GAP, during which it was more or less dormant, LoginPanel saw a surge in activity again. A first public release is near.

Why I switched from Fedora to openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

terminal-variant.blogspot: Up until now I had a Fedora 11 KDE setup but just a few days back I installed openSUSE. There were a few reasons behind it and ultimately when you hop from one distribution to another your reasons for switching will vary.

London Paper cuts costs by 66% with open source website

Filed under
Drupal

computerworlduk.com: The London Paper has switched to an open source content management system as part of a major overhaul of its website.

Also: Battlefield 1943 using Drupal
And: Australian Broadcasting Corporation using Drupal

PC makers less upbeat about Chrome OS

Filed under
OS
Google
  • PC makers less upbeat than Google about Chrome OS

  • Schmidt: Chrome OS will run other browsers
  • Intel backing Google OS
  • Google and Intel secretly worked on Chrome OS
  • How Chrome OS Will Help Ubuntu
  • Putting What We Know About Chrome OS Into Context

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Browser Comparison: Memory Usage, Speed, Acid 3 Test

  • Group test: screencasting apps
  • Ubuntu Past
  • Google Frenzy and Mono Mania
  • Peek seeks help to get Linux running
  • Ubuntu's maker: Chrome OS 'no slam dunk' just because Google announces it
  • Linux, Thunderbird, and the BlackBerry; A Love Story
  • Towards responsible disclosure
  • GNOME Annual Report 2008 released
  • Of Monopolies and Mono
  • Virtualbox 3.0: Virtualization Brilliance
  • An interview with Travis Newman
  • Five ways Microsoft has changed since Gates left
  • Life with Linux: Up and running, and changing the look
  • Linux Outlaws 101 - FISL, Fo' Shizzle

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Copy Your Linux Install to a Different Partition or Drive

  • Limit the CPU usage of a certain application in Linux
  • Howto Install Dropbox Without Gnome/Nautilus
  • Easy GUI Management of Grub and Usplash Settings with Startup Manager
  • Getting the best out of Totem on Debian
  • MySQL backup on Ubuntu | Debian
  • PGP – Setting Up Your Launchpad Key
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming