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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 25 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Rarin' to buy an Ubuntu phone? Maybe not until 2015, Canonical man says Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 8:27am
Story Chrome 33 Beta: Custom Elements, Web Speech, and more Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 11:48pm
Story Kdbus Details Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 11:07pm
Story GnuCash Makes Money Management a Snap Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 10:29pm
Story CentOS Project Leader Karanbir Singh Opens Up on Red Hat Deal Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 10:13pm
Story Linux 3.14 Officializes Broadwell, Deprecates Legacy UMS Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 9:09pm
Story Raspberry Pi: 11 reasons why it's the perfect small server Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 9:03pm
Story Is CentOS ready for the Linux desktop? Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 8:54pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 4:46pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 1:11pm

Shuttleworth’s Apollo Challenge to the Linux Community

linux-foundation.org/blogs: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, recently wrote a post detailing a challenge he recently issued to the Linux and free software community: build a Linux-based UI and computing experience on par with Apple’s within two years. This is the free software community’s version of JFK’s Space Challenge that resulted in the Apollo program.

What They're Using: Michael Anti and His Eee PC

linuxjournal.com: Michael Anti is an engineer and journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, Huaxia Times, 21st Century World Herald, Washington Post, Southern Metropolis Daily and Far and Wide Journal. He has been a researcher, a columnist, a reporter, a war correspondent in Baghdad (in 2003) and more—and achieved notoriety in 2005 when Microsoft deleted his blog.

IP camera designs run Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: TI is offering Linux camera application source code and free codecs with two new IP camera reference designs based on its RISC/DSP SoCs. The Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) model handles widely variable lighting, while a Video Content Analytics (VCA) model targets video analytics processing applications.

Desktop Linux and Subnotebooks/Netbooks

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Desktop Linux has made inroads even to subnotebooks/netbooks. And all the leading desktop distros such as Ubuntu, Suse, PCLinuxOS, Fedora, Xandros, Mandriva and many others have rolled out their distro versions to fit these low-cost devices. The good news is that PCLinuxOS has also forayed into this area with its EePCLinuxOS.

Also: Netbooks and Mini-Laptops Buyer's Guide

Is HP building a custom Linux distro for home computers?

Filed under
Linux

electronista.com: Business Week reports that sources inside HP claim the company is readying a custom operating system based on Linux for home computer users. There are practically no details about the rumored OS at this point, aside from the fact that it's supposed to be "easier" to use than most Linux distributions.

Lancelot reaches Holy Grail of KDE menu

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: KDE 4 is barely eight months old, and already it has three options for a main menu. Until now, users have either used the default Kickoff, which makes for awkward navigation of the menu tree, or reverted to the familiar but unwieldy classic menu. Now, with the first full release of Lancelot, users have another option.

Novell Turns Inside To Hire Its New Channel Chief

Filed under
SUSE

crn.com: Novell has named Javier Colado, previously manager of the software company's Europe, Middle East and Africa operations, as its new channel chief, the company announced Friday.

Hackers attack Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
Security

telegraph.co.uk: Hackers have mounted an attack on the Large Hadron Collider, raising concerns about the security of the biggest experiment in the world as it passes an important new milestone.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 38

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #38 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Last Call for openSUSE Board Candidates, openSUSE 11.0 survey, and KDE in openSUSE 11.1 and beyond.

Does interoperability violate the GPL?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: VMWare boxes from its logoI got an e-mail this morning, tickling me to look into the idea that VMWare is violating the GPL. This idea has been around for some time and Big Money Matt has covered it beautifully.

Make Your Linux Desktop More Productive

Filed under
HowTos

lifehacker.com: Apple has convinced millions that they can make the switch from Windows to OS X, but those curious about Linux have to see for themselves if they can work or play on a free desktop. Today we're detailing a Linux desktop that helps you move quickly, work with Windows, and just get things done; read on for a few suggestions on setting it up.

Boxee aims to shake up the home theater

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Boxee is a new entrant into the increasingly crowded open source media center space. The company's eponymous application is billed as a "social media center" -- melding a smorgasbord of social networking services into an XBMC-based media center designed for the couch-centric user.

The 2008 kernel summit

Filed under
Linux

Jonathan Corbet: The agenda for the 2008 kernel summit has been posted. The summit is an annual, invitation-only event which is typically attended by 70-80 developers. It is a rare opportunity to bring part of the kernel community together for focused discussions on topics which affect the kernel as a whole.

Is Linux growing at Windows' or Unix's expense?

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Windows may be king of data centers, but Linux has a foothold in nearly every courtyard and is sure to make further inroads in the year ahead.

Mozilla Colors

Filed under
Moz/FF

bholley.wordpress: I’ve been working on getting Mozilla’s color management backend ready for the prime time. We’re finally turning it on in tonight’s nightly builds, so I thought I’d give a bit of background on the history of color management in Mozilla and on color management in general.

The open source principles of participation

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: One of the greatest and most destructive beliefs in the open source community is that "Because I'm not a programmer, I can't participate in an open source project." Let me be the first to tell you that if you believe that, you're wrong. Dead wrong.

opensuse adds Installation over serial line

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: It’s now possible to install openSUSE if you only have a serial line (without additional tricks). Our graphical bootloader frontend used to ignore serial input. That’s now (starting with 11.1 beta1) changed.

Protecting your network with Strata Guard Free

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Being connected to the Internet means exposure to what the outside world has to offer -- including the undesirable elements. Every time you connect to the Internet, you're exposed to threats that can compromise your network's security. Although network security solutions have evolved in recent years, so have network attack techniques.

Book Review: "Intellectual Property and Open Source"

Filed under
OSS

arstechnica.com: You'd have to do a lot of man-on-the-street interviews before you'd find someone who could explain the difference between a patent and a trademark. Into this void steps Van Lindberg, a former software engineer and now a lawyer who specializes in the legal issues surrounding the free software community.

Linux Foundation Expands Fellowship Program to Support Kernel Developers

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin: The Linux Foundation, in concert with several well-known industry names (hint: they start with letters like I and G), has hired a key contributor to the Linux kernel development community, the system administrator for kernel.org.

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Project Releases

Security Leftovers

  • Krebs Goes Down, Opera Gets a VPN & More…
    Krebs on Security in record DDOS attack: Everybody’s go-to site for news and views of security issues, has been temporarily knocked offline in a DDOS attack for the record books. We first heard about the attack on Thursday morning after Brian Krebs reported that his site was being hit by as much as 620 Gbs, more than double the previous record which was considered to be a mind-blower back in 2013 when the anti-spam site Spamhaus was brought to its knees. Security sites such as Krebs’ that perform investigative research into security issues are often targets of the bad guys. In this latest case, Ars Technica reported the attack came after Krebs published the identity of people connected with vDOS, Israeli black hats who launched DDOS attacks for pay and took in $600,000 in two years doing so. Akamai had been donating DDoS mitigation services to Krebs, but by 4 p.m. on the day the attack began they withdrew the service, motivated by the high cost of defending against such a massive attack. At this point, Krebs decided to shut down his site.
  • Upgrade your SSH keys!
    When generating the keypair, you're asked for a passphrase to encrypt the private key with. If you will ever lose your private key it should protect others from impersonating you because it will be encrypted with the passphrase. To actually prevent this, one should make sure to prevent easy brute-forcing of the passphrase. OpenSSH key generator offers two options to resistance to brute-force password cracking: using the new OpenSSH key format and increasing the amount of key derivation function rounds. It slows down the process of unlocking the key, but this is what prevents efficient brute-forcing by a malicious user too. I'd say experiment with the amount of rounds on your system. Start at about 100 rounds. On my system it takes about one second to decrypt and load the key once per day using an agent. Very much acceptable, imo.
  • Irssi 0.8.20 Released
  • What It Costs to Run Let's Encrypt
    Today we’d like to explain what it costs to run Let’s Encrypt. We’re doing this because we strive to be a transparent organization, we want people to have some context for their contributions to the project, and because it’s interesting. Let’s Encrypt will require about $2.9M USD to operate in 2017. We believe this is an incredible value for a secure and reliable service that is capable of issuing certificates globally, to every server on the Web free of charge. We’re currently working to raise the money we need to operate through the next year. Please consider donating or becoming a sponsor if you’re able to do so! In the event that we end up being able to raise more money than we need to just keep Let’s Encrypt running we can look into adding other services to improve access to a more secure and privacy-respecting Web.
  • North Korean DNS Leak reveals North Korean websites
    One of North Korea’s top level DNS servers was mis-configured today (20th September 2016) accidentally allowing global DNS zone transfers. This allowed anyone who makes a zone transfer request (AXFR) to retrieve a copy of the nation’s top level DNS data. [...] This data showed there are 28 domains configured inside North Korea, here is the list: airkoryo.com.kp cooks.org.kp friend.com.kp gnu.rep.kp kass.org.kp kcna.kp kiyctc.com.kp knic.com.kp koredufund.org.kp korelcfund.org.kp korfilm.com.kp ma.gov.kp masikryong.com.kp naenara.com.kp nta.gov.kp portal.net.kp rcc.net.kp rep.kp rodong.rep.kp ryongnamsan.edu.kp sdprk.org.kp silibank.net.kp star-co.net.kp star-di.net.kp star.co.kp star.edu.kp star.net.kp vok.rep.kp
  • Yahoo’s Three Hacks
    As a number of outlets have reported, Yahoo has announced that 500 million of its users’ accounts got hacked in 2014 by a suspected state actor. But that massive hack is actually one of three interesting hacks of Yahoo in recent years.

Italian Military's LibreOffice Migration Underway; 100,000+ PCs To Be Migrated

As we reported exactly an year ago, Italian Military's plans to migrate its entire fleet of desktop PCs to LibreOffice is well underway and has reached its first milestone. Since the project got started about an year ago, the Italian military have switched over 8000 PC workstations to LibreOffice. Read more

Every Little Hacker needs a Little Linux Computer

I know what you’re probably all thinking, why isn’t this kid’s adorable face on every possible toddler related product currently on the market? Rest assured, I constantly remind my sister of how she could be exploiting his cuteness for millions of dollars- but I digress. Where were we? Oh right, Linux. Let’s talk hardware. If we’re building this little dude a Linux computer and we’re “ballin’ on a budget”, there’s no better choice than a Raspberry Pi. I mean he is a hacker in training, right? His typing (and well, hand coordination in general) isn’t that great yet, so we’ll need an over-sized keyboard. A big mouse pad, and a good wireless mouse will do well. Oh, and how about a VESA mount case for the Raspberry Pi so it stays out of the way? All of that should do nicely. Read more