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Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Top Ten Steam for Linux Best-Selling List – Rust Is the King Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 2:53pm
Story We’re a partner in the industrialization of IT, says Red Hat CEO | #RHSummit Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 2:20pm
Story Getting started with Linux Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 12:46pm
Story Open Source: Getting Angry, Getting Better Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 10:39am
Story Mozilla Names Andreas Gal New CTO Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 9:33am
Story Gnome 3.14 Stable Will Be Released In September 2014, Coming With Both Better Wayland Support And Some New Apps Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 9:27am
Story 9-Way April 2014 Linux Distribution Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 9:04am
Story New course to cater to Linux newbies Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 8:28am
Story Ubuntu Trusty Tahr: More Yawns, More Polish Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 8:11am
Story Does Linux Mint exist? Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2014 - 6:50am

Interview with Sjoerd Simons of Empathy

Filed under
Software
Interviews

gnomedesktop.org: This is the third in a series of interviews about open source multimedia. For this interview we check in with Sjoerd Simons who works on the Empathy client, an which combines instant messaging, video conferencing and voice over IP into one application. Sjoerd will talk to us about the current status of Empathy and where it is going.

20 bizarre and funny ways people have broken their computers

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom: We here at Pingdom have gone through those press releases and handpicked the funniest and most bizarre incidents, for your reading pleasure.

Why Linux owes (part of) its success to Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the things that characterizes humanity is our ability to adapt quickly to external change - it’s the key reason, for example, that humans aren’t confined to one climatic zone on the planet.

Fedora Outage Notification: Koji, Wiki, Smolt, Transifex

Filed under
Linux
Web

lwn.net: Fedora has an unplanned outage which began at 2008-12-16 08:10 UTC. There is currently no ETA for resolving the issues which are disk related. Services affected are Koji, Wiki, Smolt and Transifex.

Also: Announcing Omega 10

Mandriva Linux Attracts 2,000 Partners

Filed under
MDV

thevarguy.com: When it comes to Linux, most U.S. headlines involve Canonical, Novell or Red Hat. But another Linux distribution — from Mandriva S.A. of Paris, France — is making a name for itself in the global IT channel.

Fine tunning your Linux hardware Systems

Filed under
Linux

Learn how to tune and troubleshoot your Linux hardware

Opera 9.63 Released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Hei! We released 9.63 today, which addresses quite some security issues. This release is a recommended security upgrade for all those running the latest stable releases.

Perl 5.8.9 released

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Perl 5.8.9 has been released as the latest and probably last significant release of the Perl 5.8 series. Future releases of the Perl 5.8 series are expected to only deal with security and platform build issues.

The HeHe2-ness Holiday Linux Gift Guide 2008

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Doing some shopping for your technical friends this year? Or just following the Golden Rule of Giving? That is, Give Something That You Yourself Would Like In Case They Don’t Get Around To Using It. Either way, we’ve shifted through a wide range of gifts to come up with suggestions and ideas in hopes that we can help you expand your range of gift giving.

Open source isn't free software

Filed under
OSS

blogs.computerworld: There's a long standing argument over the differences between "open-source" software and "free software. But, a more common error outside of software ideology circles is that you can use open-source software anyway you please. Nope. Wrong.

A Readers Digest History of Linux

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxblog.com: Linux as we know it was developed in 1991 by Linux Torvalds based upon the GNU code written by, or at least announced by, Richard Stallman in 1983. Just knowing that dispels the myth that Linux is based upon Unix as GNU stands for “Gnu is Not Unix.” This often leads to the use of the term GNU/LINUX.

The OpenSuse FAQ touched me in a bad place

Filed under
SUSE

meandubuntu.wordpress: Today, I was reading Slashdot coverage on the new release of OpenSUSE. Surfing from there led me from one place to another, eventually ending up on the OpenSUSE FAQ:Novell-MS. There was a particular statement that bothered me enough to make this blog entry.

Going Loco Over the Ubuntu Logo

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: Ubuntu is undoubtedly the most popular Linux distribution at the moment. It has millions of passionate users and tons of dynamic community members that can prove it. Let the following images that I’m going to show to you illustrate this phenomenon.

Amarok2.0 Part Two: Continued failure

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: First thing I saw is that Amarok couldn't playback files but didn't give me any error message. After some thinking I remembered that Ubuntu doesn't install codecs by default but Amarok just silently failed.

Open-source Software Security Vendor Praises 25 Projects

Filed under
OSS

pcworld.com (IDG): Palamida, a vendor that sells software and services around open-source software security and legal compliance, has named 25 open-source projects companies should not hesitate to use.

What’s new in Linux Mint 6 Felicia?

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulook.com: Based on Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, Linux 2.6.27, Gnome 2.24 and Xorg 7.4, Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” comes with a brand new “Software Manager”, FTP support in mintUpload, proxy support and history of updates in mintUpdate, mint4win (a Linux Mint installer for Microsoft Windows), tabbed browsing in Nautilus and a lot of other improvements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Metro 1.2 Released

  • tor2web brings anonymous Tor sites to the "regular" web
  • My Netbook Took Me Back To Windows
  • ASUS Eee PC 1000HA Netbook
  • The LTSP adds thin-client support to a Linux server
  • Semantic Sense for the Desktop
  • Bringing WINE Into Ubuntu Main
  • 7 Free Open Source Video Editors For Linux
  • Switching to KDE
  • Giving KDE a second chance
  • Intel 2.6 RC1 X.Org Driver Brings DRI2, XvMC
  • Back to Windows
  • Can Wine make Ubuntu better for Ed Tech?
  • Ubuntu EEE's New Name
  • OpenSUSE Linux 11.1 Fans are Jumping the Gun
  • One Linux to Rule Them All?
  • Linux Outlaws 68 - The Episode of the Beast

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Five Firefox Shortcuts You Need to Learn Right Now

  • Managing startup services
  • Monitor your server with Monitorix
  • Converting JPG Files to PDF
  • Condensing with Open Text Summarizer
  • Video Tutorial - Sync Sunbird with Google Calendar
  • Basic features of GIMP
  • Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part II: repeat.vim
  • How to create and extract zip, tar, tar.gz and tar.bz2 files in Linux

Care for some WINE?

Ah the taste of victory. It is sweet. Smile Especially if it is an immense victory over Microsoft.

Market Share of Operating Systems

Filed under
Linux

ultimalinux.com: This chart displays the approximate market share of Windows, Mac, and each of the 312 active Linux distributions as of December 15, 2008. Market share for each of the three major operating systems (Windows, Mac, and Linux) was taken from HitsLink, and is based on data from November 2008.

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More in Tux Machines

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Understanding SELinux Roles
    I received a container bugzilla today for someone who was attempting to assign a container process to the object_r role. Hopefully this blog will help explain how roles work with SELinux. When we describe SELinux we often concentrate on Type Enforcement, which is the most important and most used feature of SELinux. This is what describe in the SELinux Coloring book as Dogs and Cats. We also describe MLS/MCS Separation in the coloring book.
  • The Internet Society is unhappy about security – pretty much all of it
    The Internet Society (ISOC) is the latest organisation saying, in essence, “security is rubbish – fix it”. Years of big data breaches are having their impact, it seems: in its report released last week, it quotes a 54-country, 24,000-respondent survey reporting a long-term end user trend to become more fearful in using the Internet (by Ipsos on behalf of the Centre for International Governance Innovation). Report author, economist and ISOC fellow Michael Kende, reckons companies aren't doing enough to control breaches. “According to the Online Trust Alliance, 93 per cent of breaches are preventable” he said, but “steps to mitigate the cost of breaches that do occur are not taken – attackers cannot steal data that is not stored, and cannot use data that is encrypted.”
  • UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor
    Among the many unpleasant things in the Investigatory Powers Act that was officially signed into law this week, one that has not gained as much attention is the apparent ability for the UK government to undermine encryption and demand surveillance backdoors. As the bill was passing through Parliament, several organizations noted their alarm at section 217 which obliged ISPs, telcos and other communications providers to let the government know in advance of any new products and services being deployed and allow the government to demand "technical" changes to software and systems.
  • EU budget creates bug bounty programme to improve cybersecurity
    Today the European Parliament approved the EU Budget for 2017. The budget sets aside 1.9 million euros in order to improve the EU's IT infrastructure by extending the free software audit programme (FOSSA) that MEPs Max Anderson and Julia Reda initiated two years ago, and by including a bug bounty approach in the programme that was proposed by MEP Marietje Schaake.
  • Qubes OS Begins Commercialization and Community Funding Efforts
    Since the initial launch of Qubes OS back in April 2010, work on Qubes has been funded in several different ways. Originally a pet project, it was first supported by Invisible Things Lab (ITL) out of the money we earned on various R&D and consulting contracts. Later, we decided that we should try to commercialize it. Our idea, back then, was to commercialize Windows AppVM support. Unlike the rest of Qubes OS, which is licensed under GPLv2, we thought we would offer Windows AppVM support under a proprietary license. Even though we made a lot of progress on both the business and technical sides of this endeavor, it ultimately failed. Luckily, we got a helping hand from the Open Technology Fund (OTF), which has supported the project for the past two years. While not a large sum of money in itself, it did help us a lot, especially with all the work necessary to improve Qubes’ user interface, documentation, and outreach to new communities. Indeed, the (estimated) Qubes user base has grown significantly over that period. Thank you, OTF!
  • Linux Security Basics: What System Administrators Need to Know
    Every new Linux system administrator needs to learn a few core concepts before delving into the operating system and its applications. This short guide gives a summary of some of the essential security measures that every root user must know. All advice given follows the best security practices that are mandated by the community and the industry.
  • BitUnmap: Attacking Android Ashmem
    The law of leaky abstractions states that “all non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky”. In this blog post we’ll explore the ashmem shared memory interface provided by Android and see how false assumptions about its internal operation can result in security vulnerabilities affecting core system code.

GNU/FSF

  • The Three Software Freedoms
    The government can help us by making software companies distribute the source code. They can say it's "in the interest of national security". And they can sort out the patent system (there are various problems with how the patent system handles software which are out of the scope of this article). So when you chat to your MP please mention this.
  • Leapfrog Honoring the GPL
  • A discussion on GPL compliance
    Among its many activities, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) is one of the few organizations that does any work on enforcing the GPL when other compliance efforts have failed. A suggestion by SFC executive director Karen Sandler to have a Q&A session about compliance and enforcement at this year's Kernel Summit led to a prolonged discussion, but not to such a session being added to the agenda. However, the co-located Linux Plumbers Conference set up a "birds of a feather" (BoF) session so that interested developers could hear more about the SFC's efforts, get their questions answered, and provide feedback. Sandler and SFC director of strategic initiatives Brett Smith hosted the discussion, which was quite well-attended—roughly 70 people were there at a 6pm BoF on November 3.
  • Join us as a member to give back for the free software you use
    At the FSF, we run our own infrastructure using only free software, which makes us stand out from nearly every other nonprofit organization. Virtually all others rely on outside providers and use a significant amount of nonfree software. With your support, we set an example proving that a nonprofit can follow best practices while running only free software.
  • The Free Software Foundation is in need of members

today's howtos