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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Battle of the Thumb Drive Linux Systems

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Linux These days, it only takes an increasingly-cheap USB thumb drive and a program like UNetbootin to create a portable Linux desktop you can run on any computer that can boot from a USB port. But check out the list of distributions UNetbootin can download and install—it's huge.

Four layout extensions for Writer

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OOo Writer is as much a desktop publishing program as a word processor. That fact, however, has yet to have much influence on the extensions created for Writer -- perhaps because most users prefer manual formatting to organizing themselves with page styles, templates, and other elements of document design. Still, extensions for layout are starting to appear.

Would The Internet Exist Without Linux?

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Linux The internet as we know it today predominantly runs on Linux. There’s an extremely high probability that the internet connection you’re using right now is connected thru a Linux server - and routed thru many other Linux servers along the way.

The Philosophy and Features of Ubuntu 8.10

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Ubuntu Last week, I had the pleasure of getting some unique insight into the Ubuntu 8.10 release ("Intrepid Ibex") from Canonical's marketing manager, Gerry Carr. The finalized server and desktop editions of the 8.10 release will be available for download October 30th, and host a variety of new tools and features.

few more odds & ends

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  • Ubuntu® 8.10 Press Release Already

  • Ubuntu Linux: 8 Million Users and Growing
  • Ubuntu for Business
  • Speed up your Linux Boot and normal use (openSUSE)
  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 10/24
  • Open Season is now Open Sources... Episode 1
  • Open-Source Wireless Routing

odds & ends

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  • The dark (theme) side of Firefox

  • New feature for game developers coming to Jaunty
  • Lack of interest forces cancellation of Open Standards conference
  • Stable kernel
  • Kernel prepatch 2.6.28-rc2
  • Get Your Local TV Listings From The Bash Command Line
  • Preview: Ubuntu/Kubuntu 8.10 “Intrepid Ibex”
  • Geek War: Mac vs. PC vs. Linux
  • Deleting whole words on a bash command line
  • SplashTop Security Hole Still Exists
  • The Linux Action Show! Season 9 Episode 7
  • Naples goes Open Source
  • Australians Demand Linux Netbooks
  • Unmask packages in Gentoo
  • Piracy Hurts Open Source Also
  • Linus' Blog: Candyland

some ubuntu stuff

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  • Dell Inspiron Mini 12 First Impressions; The $600 MacBook Air??

  • Ubuntu Hard Drive Logos
  • Five Tips to Prepare for Release Day!
  • Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex - You can Tell Release is Approaching
  • Easy way to install libdvdcss2 and w62codecs for Ubuntu 8.10 AMD-64 bit
  • Ubuntu 8.04
  • Installing Wine in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex
  • The upgrade to Ubuntu 8.10

Basket: Open Source replacement for Microsoft OneNote

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Software Recently a client of mine came to me with a request: Find an open source replacement for Microsoft OneNote. I had actually never heard of OneNote, so when he told me what OneNote did I was pretty confident I could find something for the Linux operating system that could do the same things.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #114

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Ubuntu The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #114 for the week of October 19th - October 25th, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: * Ubuntu 8.10 RC released, * Intrepid Release Parties, and * Pre-order Intrepid CDs.

Battle for Wesnoth - Awesome Turn-Based Strategy Game

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tuxarena.blogspot: Battle for Wesnoth is one of the most popular and played turn-based strategy (TBS) games on Linux, if not the most popular. It's a free, open-source community-driven project which has done some amazing improvements since its initial release.

My Intrepid Desktop

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Ubuntu I couldn’t wait any longer so I did a 100% new install of Intrepid yesterday. I decided that is was time for an entirely new install. It takes a lot of faith to wipe out 200GB of data. However, I’m happy to report that my new Intrepid desktop is running beautifully and all my data survived, I hope.

My Firefox 3 experience

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myviewmytake.wordpress: A few months ago, I wrote an article entitled Opera 9.5–My browser of choice. Since Firefox 3 has been released, I have used it more often than I have used Opera 9.5, mainly due to the way it works with WordPress.

How long until Apple is bigger than Microsoft?

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Mac While Microsoft executives like to talk about Apple as an insignificant company with less than 5% of the worldwide market share of all PCs and servers sold, the Mac maker now has more cash than Microsoft and earns more than half of its profits and over three fourths its revenues.

Features I’d Like to See in Ubuntu 9.04

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Ubuntu There are so many things I’d like to change in Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex (it is still a great Linux OS), but don’t have the time/knowledge to do. I am very active in promotion, but maybe someone who knows his stuff will read this list of ideas for inspiration.

Dolphin Features for KDE 4.2

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ppenz.blogspot: The feature freeze for KDE 4.2 starts on the November the 17th. Time again for a summary of the features that made it into Dolphin since KDE 4.1...

Fedora 10 Prepares For Development Freeze

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Linux The release date for Fedora 10 (codenamed Cambridge) is less than one month away and as a result this Red Hat distribution will go into a development freeze beginning Tuesday. The new desktop background in Fedora 10 is part of their solar theme. Some of the packages currently in Fedora 10 / Rawhide are GNOME 2.24.1, the Linux 2.6.27 kernel, X Server 1.5.2, 3.0, Firefox 3.0, and GIMP 2.6.1.

Linux Provides a Secure Hierarchical Filesystem

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computingtech.blogspot: A file is a collection of information, such as text for a memo or report, an accumulation of sales figures, an image, a song, or an executable program. The Linux filesystem provides a structure whereby files are arranged under directories, which are like folders or boxes.

Rename music files through Ex Falso

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Software If you have a huge collection of music files already, sometimes you realize that you were too lazy to add tags and/or descriptive file names to them. It’s a mess! But no need to worry! Ex Falso will help you organize your files.

rdiff-backup: Easy incremental backups from the command line

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Software Storage is becoming cheaper and cheaper: you can find hard drives that cost less than a dollar per GiB. Buying an external hard drive to make backups (or even having a backup server) is a must if you value your work and what you have stored in your computer. However, doing backups should be easy enough to be done on a regular basis. The more automated, the better.

First-Person Shooter Games for Linux II: Nexuiz and OpenArena

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tuxarena.blogspot: Today I will continue with two other first-person shooter (FPS) games, natively available for Linux: Nexuiz and OpenArena. They both are currently maintained and the wonderful thing about them is that they all are completely open-source, free and usually available in all the major distributions.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.