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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Taxes of the Tech World - Linux, Microsoft, and More

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

raiden.net: Recently Dell began denying purchasers of their Linux desktop machines the ability to get a refund on their "Windows Tax", the carefully hidden cost of Windows included in the price of the machine they just purchased. So why are they doing this?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Alice in Colorland: RGB vs CMYK
  • command ls -l output explained
  • Combine Dropbox with Ubuntu One
  • Kdump on openSUSE 11.2
  • Ubuntu 9.10 USB automount
  • Buck-security - Security scanner for Ubuntu Servers
  • Linux Commands: Making Bash Error Messages Friendlier
  • Encrypted USB openSUSE 11.2 Boot Disk
  • MPlayer on Fedora
  • GNOME Split File Splitter Application for Ubuntu
  • Choose Your VIM Color Scheme With Color Sampler Pack

GNOME 2.30 Released

Filed under
Software

gnome.org: The GNOME Project is proud to announce GNOME 2.30, the latest stable release of the popular Free Software desktop environment and applications suite.

Linux isn't invulnerable. Don't say it is.

Filed under
Linux
Security

thepcspy.com: Every month or so, I find some blog or forum post telling the world that because Linux is so hardcore, there's very little chance of it getting any malware. As you can probably tell from the title, I disagree and want these people to recognise why their arrogance is dangerous.

New Application Could Make All Software 'open Source'

pcworld.com: Imagine controlling Apple iTunes from inside Microsoft Word without having to switch applications. That could be possible, according to researchers at the University of Washington who are working on a project that could essentially make any proprietary software open source.

KDE picks Kim Kardashian to promote next release

Filed under
KDE
Humor

itwire.com: The KDE Desktop Project has hit upon the idea of having the American socialite Kim Kardashian promote its next release.

Legal Strings Remain in Novell-SCO Group Tussle over Unix

Filed under
SUSE

eweek.com: There are still some dangling legal strings that need to be trimmed, and those won't happen for at least a few weeks -- barring any more appeals, of course, by the Lindon, Utah-based SCO Group. One of them involves counterclaims by IBM and Red Hat.

GNU/Linux and freedom: non-free software hidden in your GNU/Linux distribution

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Most people with an interest in software freedom will turn to GNU/Linux as their operating system of choice. Few realize however, that the vast majority of GNU/Linux distros are not entirely free. Imagine migrating away from Windows, only to find that by installing GNU/Linux you are accepting a restrictive Microsoft license!

Fake outrage for Sony's moves

Filed under
Linux

blog.flameeyes.eu: March 2010 is likely to become famous in the Free Software, Open Source movements’ histories as the month of the “corporate betrayals”.

Google buys Microsoft

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Humor

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Following a spate of recent acquisitions Google's CEO Eric Schmidt announced this morning that the Mountain View-based company had bought Microsoft Corporation.

Mozilla State of the Internet Report

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Introducing the Mozilla State of the Internet Report
  • Firefox 3.5.9 and 3.0.19 security updates now available
  • Mozilla spits out last version of Firefox 3.0
  • Firefox developers block old CSS leak
  • Firefox coders propose fast-graphics deadline

SCO, Novell: Grokking Where Credit is Due

Filed under
Web

itworld.com: The next thing that ruined SCO's plans? Groklaw.

Also: Groklaw: How One Person Can Do Big Deeds. Thanks PJ.

Ubuntu Unravelled

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxuser.co.uk: I’m aware that nearly all people in the Linux ecosphere are familiar with what Ubuntu is. However, it is my impression that many people, including some Ubuntu users, do not know how the distribution is made.

Linux on Netbooks Reloads With Ubuntu-based Jolicloud

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: Linux was a resounding failure on netbooks, so what makes this French start-up firm think it can succeed with a Linux derivative?

Linux Mint 8 releases

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Mint 8 “Helena” LXDE released
  • Linux Mint 8 “Helena” Xfce released

Linux, Where Crapware Goes to Die

Filed under
Linux
Software

linuxjournal.com: Remember this cute little purple ape? If you’re a Linux user, you might not. He was one of the earliest malware/spyware/crapware programs for the Microsoft Windows platform. Why were Linux users left out in the cold during the heyday of BonziBuddy?

Thunar and Rox Filer: Mighty File Managers

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: Thunar and Rox Filer are different from the average file manager, and different from each other too. Both are powerful and flexible, offering features unavailable in other Linux file managers.

coupla interviews:

Filed under
Interviews
  • Five questions about building community with Chris Blizzard of Mozilla
  • Chris Johnston from the Ubuntu Beginners Team

Document Freedom Day

Filed under
OSS
  • Document Freedom Day - March 31st, 2010
  • Freedom! (Document-wise)
  • Document Freedom Day: Passion and politics

Cool portable linux music studio

Filed under
Hardware
Software

handlewithlinux.com: Making music on Linux used to be something for masochists. Luckily this is long something of the past, as nowadays lot's of cool Linux software and compatible hardware is available to musicians.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.6 RC, AMDGPU, and Vulkan

  • Mesa 17.2.6 release candidate
  • Mesa 17.2.6 RC Arrives With 50+ Fixes
    While Mesa 17.3 is imminent and should be released as stable within the next few days, Mesa 17.2.6 is being prepped for release as the current point release.
  • 43 More AMDGPU DC Patches Hit The Streets
    While the massive AMDGPU DC infrastructure has been merged for Linux 4.15, the flow of improvements to this display code continues and it looks like the next few kernel cycles at least could be quite busy on the AMD front.
  • A Prototype Of The Vulkan Portability Initiative: Low-Level 3D To Vulkan / D3D12 / Metal
    A Mozilla engineer has put out a prototype library in working on the Vulkan Portability Initiative for allowing low-level 3D graphics support that's backed by Vulkan / Direct3D 12 / Metal. With Apple sticking to their own Metal graphics API and Direct3D 12 still being the dominant graphics API on Windows 10, The Khronos Group has been working towards better 3D portability for where Vulkan may not be directly supported by the OS/drivers or otherwise available. They've been working to target a subset of the Vulkan API that can be efficiently mapped to these other native graphics APIs and to have the libraries and tooling for better compatibility and code re-use of these different graphics APIs.

Kernel: Linux 4.15, TLDR, and Linus Torvalds' Latest Rant

  • Linux 4.15 Adds AMD Raven Ridge Audio ID
    Not only is AMD Stoney Ridge audio (finally) being supported by the Linux 4.15 kernel, but it also looks like Raven Ridge audio should now be working too.
  • Linux 4.14.2 Fixes The BCache Corruption Bug
    Normally I don't bother mentioning new Linux kernel point releases on Phoronix unless there are some significant changes, as is the case today with Linux 4.14.2.
  • TLDR is what Linux man pages always should have been
    If you get stuck using a Linux tool, the first port of call shouldn’t be to Stack Overflow, but rather its “man pages.” Man — which is short for manual — retrieves documentation for a given program. Unfortunately, this can often be dense, hard to understand, and lacking in practical examples to help you solve your problem. TLDR is another way of looking at documentation. Rather than being a comprehensive guide to a given tool, it instead focuses on offering practical example-driven instructions of how something works.
  • Linux creator Linus Torvalds: This is what drives me nuts about IT security
    Developers are often accused of not thinking about security, but Linux kernel founder Linus Torvalds has had enough of security people who don't think about developers and end-users. After blasting some kernel developers last week for killing processes in the name of hardening the kernel, Torvalds has offered a more measured explanation for his frustration with security myopia. While he agrees that having multiple layers of security in the kernel is a good idea, certain ways of implementing it are not, in particular if it annoys users and developers by killing processes that break users' machines and wreck core kernel code. Because ultimately, if there are no users, there's not much point in having a supremely secure kernel, Torvalds contends.

Unity 7 Hoping To Become An Official Flavor For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

While Canonical abandoned their work on the Unity desktop environment in favor of the Unity-inspired customized GNOME Shell that debuted in Ubuntu 17.10, some within the community have remained interested in maintaining Unity 7 and even getting it into an official spin/flavor of Ubuntu. Posted today to the community.ubuntu.com was a Unity maintenance roadmap, reiterating the hope by some in the Ubuntu community for Ubuntu Unity to become an official LTS distribution of Ubuntu. They are hoping to make it an official flavor alongside Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Xubuntu, and others. Read more Original/direct: Unity Maintenance Roadmap

Programming/Development: Django and Google India

  • An introduction to the Django ORM
    One of the most powerful features of Django is its Object-Relational Mapper (ORM), which enables you to interact with your database, like you would with SQL. In fact, Django's ORM is just a pythonical way to create SQL to query and manipulate your database and get results in a pythonic fashion. Well, I say just a way, but it's actually really clever engineering that takes advantage of some of the more complex parts of Python to make developers' lives easier.
  • Hey, Coders! Google India Is Offering 130,000 Free Developer Scholarships — Here’s How To Apply
  • Google to prepare 1.3 lakh Indians for emerging technologies

    "The new scholarship programme is in tandem with Google's aim to train two million developers in India. The country is the second largest developer ecosystem in the world and is bound to overtake the US by 2021," William Florance, Developer Products Group and Skilling Lead for India, Google, told reporters here.