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Monday, 25 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Ubuntu Aims to Make Open-Source Development ‘Personal’

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Aims to Make Open-Source Development ‘Personal’
  • unity places files/applications is back, changes to ubuntu classic desktop [natty updates]
  • File and Application places land in Ubuntu 11.04
  • Natty sound menu adds playlist support
  • Create Your Own Ubuntu Packages with GiftWrap

Debian Project News - January 31st

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's second issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include:

An anthropologist's view of an open source community

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • An anthropologist's view of an open source community
  • FUDcon Tempe Day 2
  • FUDcon Tempe Day 1
  • Fudcon 2011: Day 2

Guide to CMus - Music Player for Your Terminal

Filed under
HowTos

CMus is a free, powerful, terminal-based music player using the ncurses toolkit. CMus supports various audio formats, including Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, MP3, WAV, Musepack, WavPack, WMA, AAC and MP4. Although CMus is not the only good player for the shell (alternatives like MOC, Herrie or mp3blaster are also available), I prefer it due to its unique keyboard shortcuts and feature completeness.

Why We Insist on Linux on the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

linuxlock.blogspot: We insist on installing Linux with every computer we give away. Sure, there are the philosophical reasons. As well, there are financial incentives to do so, but in my world...in the world of 1-3 computer installs every day of the week...

Mandriva 2011 Delayed Due to Major Changes

Filed under
MDV

ostatic.com: Mandriva 2011 has been delayed primarily because of the team's major change to RPM5. Because a preview was promised today, a Mandriva Technology Preview is being released to showcase some of the newest changes.

An Update On Reiser4 For The Mainline Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: In November of 2009 we reported that the Reiser4 file-system may go into the mainline Linux kernel in late 2010. We're now into 2011 with the merge window having closed earlier this month for the Linux 2.6.38 kernel and there's no sign of this open-source file-system designed to succeed the popular ReiserFS. So what gives?

Open source group preps Linux computer for Lunar X-Prize glory

Filed under
Linux

linuxfordevices.com: At the Linux.conf.au conference, an Australian-based "Lunar Numbat" project presented its plan for a Linux-based flight control computer for a lunar spacecraft.

11 Killer Features That Make Ubuntu 11.04 Worth the Wait

Filed under
Ubuntu

hubpages.com: Here are 11 features that will make Ubuntu 11.04 worth the long wait.

A Linux Compiler Deathmatch: GCC, LLVM, DragonEgg, Open64, Etc...

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Started by one of our readers more than a week ago was a compiler deathmatch for comparing the performance of GCC, LLVM Clang, PCC (the Portable C Compiler), TCC (Tiny C Compiler), and Intel's C Compiler under Arch Linux. This user did not stop there with compiling these different x86_64 code compilers, but he also went on to look at the compiler performance with different compiler flags, among other options.

Welcome to Linux city

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com: Modern cities have a supporting structure to be able to handle such a large number of people. This infrastructure is both visible, eg. bus and train networks and invisible, eg, water and sewerage. Without these important networks in place or if they are inadequate then the city comes to a standstill.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 390

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First impressions of Chakra GNU/Linux 0.3.1
  • News: openSUSE initiates a cross-disro application installer, Fedora developers gather at FUDCon, Debian talk at LCA
  • Questions and answers: Using chroot
  • Released last week: Distribution Release: Sabayon Linux 5.5, ArchBang Linux 2011.01
  • Upcoming releases: Debian GNU/Linux 6.0, Ubuntu 11.04 Alpha 2, FreeBSD 8.2-RC3
  • New additions: Turnkey Linux
  • New distributions: Parabola GNU/Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Patrons vexed by glitches in new library software

Filed under
OSS

nwsource.com: For thousands of library patrons for whom using the online catalog became painfully slow, who couldn't log on at all or who could no longer pay fines electronically, the switch to the new system has been an exercise in frustration.

London Stock Exchange 'under major cyberattack' during Linux switch

Filed under
Linux
Security

computerworlduk.com: The London Stock Exchange’s new open source trading system may have been hacked last year, according to a report.

PirateBox: an "artistic provocation" in lunchbox form

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

arstechnica.com: Inside the PirateBox sits a Free Agent Dockstar, an Asus WL330GE wireless router, and a SanDisk 16GB flash drive. The software, including Debian Linux and the DD-WRT open-source router firmware, is all free. The total build cost is under $100.

Debian 6.0: Stability and Power to the People

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Debian official releases are more rare than releases of other distributions, but tend to matter less to users. Judging by the second release candidate, Debian 6.0 will be no exception.

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • how to install oxygen-transparent style in ubuntu [kde]
  • Open source access unchanged under revised Oz law
  • Portable C Compiler Is Building FreeBSD, Nearing v1.0
  • Make Your Own Stop-Motion Animation Using Stopmotion
  • Kernel C Extras in a Linux Driver
  • How To Help & Support Linux, Open-Source?
  • Linux Remote Support Software - Bomgar
  • How to install Libre Office in Mandriva 2010.2
  • Alternate Characters from Keyboard
  • The True Spirit of Open Source
  • Linux Outlaws 188 - Minix Lint
  • Fixing /var/lib/dpkg/status corruption
  • Mozilla pays out US$40,000 for web bugs
  • Pesce sorry for raunchy pics at Linux.conf.au
  • Opensuse11.4 - Apache - Access Forbidden 404| FAQs

Review: Sabayon 5.5 KDE

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: If you are a regular reader of this blog, Sabayon needs no introduction. Suffice it to say that version 5.5 has been released, and as has become tradition for me (so to speak), I am testing the KDE version of this new release.

35 Great Open Web Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • 35 Great Open Web Games
  • The Legend of Edgar 0.76 Released
  • Linux Games Icon Pack

WordNet+Artha: A great Linux thesaurus combo

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: I write loads of technical documentation as well as novels. Because of my trade I am always seeking out tools to aid in my own process. And although the web has made everything so much easier, it is still good to have a few dedicated tools around to make everything easier. One of the tools I take advantage of is a thesaurus.

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More in Tux Machines

Review: BunsenLabs Helium

I have got a bit of soft spot for Openbox. I like how minimalist it is and how it hardly uses any system resources - according to my Conky panel BunsenLabs was using just over 200MB of RAM when idle. BunsenLabs provides a system that is usable out of the box but which can be tweaked any way you want. For this review I made the system cleaner and leaner but I could have gone in the opposite direction and create a desktop with conkies, panels and docks all over the place. DistroWatch's slogan, "put the fun back into computing", very much applies to BunsenLabs. In short, this is a distro I could easily use as my daily driver. My only concern would be the project's long term future. BunsenLabs Helium was released almost a year after Debian Stretch was released and then there is the worrying fact that Openbox doesn't work under Wayland, which is getting ever closer to replacing Xorg. BunsenLabs has got a sound community though, so I very much hope this distro will be around for many years to come. Read more

KaOS 2018.06

Just days after Plasma 5.13.1 was announced can you already see it on this new release. Highlights of Plasma 5.13 include optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance, and less memory consumption. System Settings with KDE’s Kirigami framework gives the pages a slick new look. KWin gained much-improved effects for blur and desktop switching. Wayland work continued, with the return of window rules, the use of high priority EGL Contexts, and initial support for screencasts and desktop sharing. And a tech preview of GTK global menu integration. Read more

8 reasons to use the Xfce Linux desktop environment

The Xfce desktop is thin and fast with an overall elegance that makes it easy to figure out how to do things. Its lightweight construction conserves both memory and CPU cycles. This makes it ideal for older hosts with few resources to spare for a desktop. However, Xfce is flexible and powerful enough to satisfy my needs as a power user. I've learned that changing to a new Linux desktop can take some work to configure it as I want—with all of my favorite application launchers on the panel, my preferred wallpaper, and much more. I have changed to new desktops or updates of old ones many times over the years. It takes some time and a bit of patience. I think of it like when I've moved cubicles or offices at work. Someone carries my stuff from the old office to the new one, and I connect my computer, unpack the boxes, and place their contents in appropriate locations in my new office. Moving into the Xfce desktop was the easiest move I have ever made. Read more

Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
    During the process of testing, bugs are reported to the development team. Quality assurance testers describe the bug in as much detail as possible, reporting on their system state, the processes they were undertaking, and how the bug manifested itself. Despite this, some bugs are never confirmed; they may be reported in testing but can never be reproduced in a controlled environment. In such cases they may not be resolved but are instead closed. It can be difficult to confirm a computer bug due to the wide array of platforms in use and the many different types of user behavior. Some bugs only occur intermittently or under very specific situations, and others may occur seemingly at random. Many people use and interact with open source software, and many bugs and issues may be non-repeatable or may not be adequately described. Still, because every user and developer also plays the role of quality assurance tester, at least in part, there is a good chance that bugs will be revealed.
  • LLVM's OpenMP Offloads Liboffload Into Oblivion
    The liboffload library has been dropped from LLVM's OpenMP repository. Liboffload is/was the Intel runtime library for offloading and geared for supporting the Xeon Phi co-processors. But liboffload within LLVM hasn't been receiving updates, it wasn't properly integrated within the LLVM build system, and unfortunately Xeon Phi co-processors appear to be discontinued. The liboffload library has also confused some with LLVM's libomptarget library for OpenMP support that is in much better shape.