Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 24 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

KDE 4.1 release ups free desktop ante

Filed under
KDE

techworld.com.au: After six months of development since the release of the much publicized 4.0, the KDE project has unveiled version 4.1 which includes many new bug fixes and feature enhancements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Survey: Economy Pushing Users to Open Source

  • Open-source sales growing despite economy
  • What has Grandma go to do with it?
  • 10 things you didn’t know you could do in Ubuntu
  • 5 things you didn’t know about linux kernel code metrics
  • Desktop Drapes: Another GNOME Wallpaper Changer
  • How to install Launchy on Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)
  • How to speed up booting into GNOME
  • nUbuntu Development Kicking Off Again - Security LiveCD
  • The Geekiest Nighthmare
  • Rwanda: 5,000 Laptops for Students Arrive
  • Dear Mr. Shuttleworth
  • Stable kernel 2.6.25.13 Released
  • Dual Boot Ubuntu with Windows Vista/XP
  • LiMo kills Linux smartphone
  • Foxconn says ACPI issues are AMI’s fault
  • OLS 2008 wrap-up
  • Xataface lets non-technical users edit MySQL data
  • Recent customer wins for open source
  • Using Sysctl To Change Kernel Tunables On Linux
  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 07/25

No! Wha…oooh…wow. Yes!

Filed under
Linux

ubuntuproductivity.com: Using linux feels a lot like listening to an undiscovered band; it’s the new band none of my friends have listened to. When they first experience it they want it. I have it. I feel special. You know the story…

Is Microsoft really any more trustworthy?

Filed under
Microsoft

practical-tech.com: Lately, Microsoft has been trying really, really hard to appear as open source’s best friend. All I can say is: “With friends like these, who needs enemies?”

Also: Could Microsoft actually be getting an open-source clue?

Implicit Save KDE vs GNOME

Filed under
Software

obso1337.org: One of the interesting things I learned at the last Ubuntu Developer Summit was the widespread use of implicit save in the GNOME environment. In many cases, implicit save makes a lot of sense and makes the configuration and interaction with options much more natural.

VPS Setup Part 1 - Update Ubuntu and Configure iptables

Filed under
HowTos

dailycupoftech.com: Since the whole VPS (Virtual Private Server) thing is going so well for me, I thought that I would let my readers know about some of the steps that I took to set it up. In this episode I will be talking about updating the initially installed image and configuring the linux firewall using iptables.

OpenOffice.org Tips and Tricks Part I

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: This tutorial series will take you through some tips and tricks on migrating from MS Office to OpenOffice.org 2.4. You'll see how to replicate some of the functionality and features that are lacking in OpenOffice.org

Wine @ Work: Running MS Office and IE on Linux

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux-mag.com: In this article, I show you how to install Wine, Microsoft Office 2003, and Internet Explorer using my Red Hat derivative system (CentOS 5.1) as the host. You can give your system some Wine by compiling from source code, or by installing pre-compiled binaries from your distro’s repositories.

Package Management

Install extra packages on the ASUS Eee PC

  • Install extra packages on the ASUS Eee PC

  • Cracking Open the ASUS Eee 901 20G ultra-portable
  • More evidence of Microsoft "tying up" the Asus EeePC

ECS GeForce 8800GT

Filed under
Hardware
  • ECS GeForce 8800GT

  • Linux-friendly Beagle fetches $150
  • Diminutive green server for those with Linux leaning

Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

Filed under
Linux
  • Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

  • LinuxWorld 2008 features cloud, virtualization topics
  • Installfest at LinuxWorld could seed national program
  • LinuxWorld Expo Preview: Four Canonical and Ubuntu Linux Trends
  • LinuxWorld Conference & Expo Announces Finalists for Product Excellence Awards

A Quick Look at OpenOffice.org Writer 3.0 Beta 2

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta 2 is available in preparation for an official September release. Here are some quick first impressions of the Writer word-processor program.

KDE 4.1 Beta 2 on OpenSuSE 11.0

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

gordonazmo.wordpress: Decided to give OpenSuSE 11.0 a spin - wasn’t terribly amazed by the 10.3 release, but really curious to see what they did with KDE 4.x. Long story short, they did quite a nice job polishing it to look familiar to KDE 3.5.x users. Too ‘familiar’ and not enough 4.x’ish for my liking, but kudos to them - almost everything worked like you would expect it to work. Played around with it for like an hour, then decided to give KDE 4.1 Beta 2 a spin.

Will a $19.99 Ubuntu Succeed Where the Free Version Hasn’t?

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Canonical, the company behind the Linux distro Ubuntu, has collaborated with software distributor ValuSoft to sell a boxed version of Ubuntu 8.04 into Best Buy retail stores. Is $19.99 a better price point for Ubuntu than $0?

KDE 4.1: Good enough for ME

Filed under
KDE

jucato.org/blog: KDE 4.1 is coming! If all goes according to schedule, we should see it released in a day or so. I’ve migrated my main user to KDE 4 totally, except for a few KDE 3 apps here and there. I just want to share some of the things I’m loving in KDE 4 in general, and KDE 4.1 in particular. With screenshots, of course!

Economic clustering and Free Software release coordination

Mark Shuttleworth: I had the opportunity to present at the Linux Symposium on Friday, and talked further about my hope that we can improve the coordination and cadence of the entire free software stack. I tried to present both the obvious benefits and the controversies the idea has thrown up.

5 simple reasons to choose Linux over Vista

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: Linux enthusiasts have always touted for Linux to be one of the best operating systems ever. Their voice grew shriller with the advent of Microsoft Windows Vista in the market.

PCLinuxOS: Definitely “Radically Simple”

Filed under
PCLOS

blogs.techrepublic.com: The slogan for PCLinuxOS is “Radically Simple” and, as far as I can tell, it might be one of the most fitting operating system slogans I have seen. But does it apply across the board? From start to finish? I decided it had been too long since I had tried this distribution so I went about giving it a go. I have to say I was certainly impressed.

Sun dropping out of OOo wouldn't be bad

Filed under
Interviews
OOo
SUSE

derstandard.at: Novell-developer Michael Meeks finds strong words for Sun's management of the free office suite in an interview - Pushes for own OOo flavor and talks about KDE/GNOME-unification

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

“Thin Mini-ITX” Skylake board has 20mm profile

Advantech’s Linux-ready “AIMB-285” Mini-ITX board offers 6th Gen Core CPUs, a 20mm profile, mini-PCIe and PCIe, plus an optional enclosure. Advantech calls the 20mm-high AIMB-285 the first “thin Mini-ITX” board to run 6th Generation Intel Core “Skylake” processors. Intel released a “Thin Mini-ITX” spec back in 2011, with 25mm specified as the maximum board thickness including the “I/O Shield” area. Since then, we’ve only seen two other Mini-ITX boards claim a thinner, 20mm maximum thickness: Congatec’s similarly Skylake-based Conga-IC170 and Adlink’s Braswell-based AmITX-BW-I. Read more

Schools that #GoOpen should #GoOpenSource

School administrators know that traditional proprietary textbooks are expensive. Teachers in budget-strapped schools often face shortages of textbooks. Worse, print content is usually out-of-date as soon as the ink dries on the page. There has to be something better than students hauling bulbous backpacks loaded with dead knowledge stamped on dead trees. In the fall of 2015, the U.S. Department of Education launched the #GoOpen campaign, an initiative encouraging public schools to adopt openly-licensed digital educational materials to transform teaching and learning, and perhaps lighten both backpacks and textbook bills. The Department recently published the #GoOpen District Launch Packet, a useful step-by-step implementation guide for schools planning a transition from traditional textbooks to Open Educational Resources (OER). We should applaud the Department of Education's efforts to promote affordable, equitable, and quality educational materials for all schools. Their initiative empowers educators to curate, shape, and share educational content at a local level. No longer is the written word of proprietary publishers like Pearson the fountain of all classroom knowledge. Districts that choose to #GoOpen opt to honor teacher expertise, empower them to build communities of shared practice, and encourage collaboration with colleagues across counties and states. Given unfettered permission to revise, remix, and redistribute curriculum material, teachers are trusted to become active agents in the creation of high-quality learning materials. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat CEO Tells LinuxCon Crowd What Makes Linux Stand Out
    Five years ago, on the 20th anniversary of Linux, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst delivered a keynote address at LinuxCon. Today, he returned to the LinuxCon stage here to help celebrate the 25th anniversary of Linux, bringing a message not all that different from the one he shared in 2011. The Linux world, however, is a different place in 2016, with one-time mortal foe Microsoft now embracing the open-source model. Whitehurst briefly shared the keynote stage with Wim Coekaerts, corporate vice president of enterprise open source at Microsoft, which is something that wouldn't have happened five years ago. Red Hat and Microsoft today partner at multiple levels, as the message and value of open source has continued to expand. During his keynote, Whitehurst said that it's hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about the history of Linux and vice versa, as the two are very much intertwined. Back in the 1990s when Red Hat got started a few years after Linux's birth, Whitehurst said his company didn't have a great business model. At one point, Red Hat actually tried to sell shrink-wrapped boxed software at big box retailers. Around 2001, Red Hat first introduced the enterprise open-source software model that is the core of the company's business today. The basic idea is to bundle open-source software together, test and certify the software, and then provide multiple years of enterprise-grade support.
  • Option Market: Red Hat Inc Risk Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Building Fedora Rawhide Images with Imagefactory
  • Fedora 24 Release Party in Singapore
    As you might know, Fedora released its 24th version at the end of June! Recently, the Fedorans in Singapore had a party to celebrate the release. The release party was not only to celebrate its release, but also to commemorate Fedora’s open source journey so far. We invited people from different diverse background to join us for a night of fun and open conversations (Singapore is a cosmopolitan country!)

GNOME News

  • Sysprof + Builder
    After the GNOME 3.20 cycle completed I started revamping Sysprof. More here, here, and here. The development went so smoothly that I did a 3.20 release a couple of weeks later. A primary motivation of that work was rebuilding Sysprof into a set of libraries for building new tools. In particular, I wanted to integrate Sysprof with Builder as our profiler of choice. On my flight back from GUADEC I laid the groundwork to integrate these two projects. As of Builder 3.21.90 (released yesterday) you can now profile your project quite easily. There are more corner cases we need to handle but I consider those incremental bugs now.
  • GUADEC… Its been fun.
    I’m not really much of a traveler or outgoing in any way. So when I was invited to GUADEC, I wasn’t very sure about it. It took some encouragement from my mentor and a fellow GSoC mate to convince me. And… I’m glad I went! It was one of those things that I could not have experienced from my comfy chair to which I reserve myself for the greater part of my day. In fact this trip makes me feel I might be wrong about social interactions not being time well spent for me (but then again I don’t exactly buckle down into ambitious projects, so you’re free to call me ignorant).
  • gnome-boxes: GSoC Evaluation
    This post is meant to be a final self-evaluation and self-analysis of my work for gnome-boxes during the summer. The initial project idea was about implementing/fixing a bunch of SPICE-based features/bugs to/in Boxes. The list of bugs of the SPICE component has since changed, as some new bugs have been discovered and some old ones have been closed, so I made a summary of my involvement...