Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

9 Ways to Make Linux More Secure

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com: The Linux operating system has already been proven to be very reliable and secure. It is often the most popular operating system found on web servers largely accredited to its track record in security, but can it be improved?

Boycott Novell attacks itself to get attention

Filed under
Web

adterrasperaspera.com: Am I the only one out there who thinks this is an admission that Boycott Novell did it to themselves to get attention? Several blogs out there have already started talking about it so it seems to have worked.

8 Essential OpenOffice Extensions

Filed under
OOo

junauza.com: OpenOffice is already a complete desktop office suite that is at par in terms of features with the proprietary Microsoft Office. However, its functionality can still be improved by utilizing useful extensions that are easily available.

Review: gNewSense Version 2.2

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: The gNewSense project today announced version 2.2 of its free GNU/Linux distribution. This is the second point update to the release codenamed 'deltah'. We're especially excited to see that, as a result of the cooperation between SGI and the FSF to relicense the core 3D library code as free software, today's release re-introduces GLX.

The Merits of Control-Alt-Backspace, or Geeks vs. Reality

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: For the release of Jaunty, the Ubuntu developers decided to disable the control-alt-backspace shortcut for killing the graphical X session. This move prompted a lot of complaining from advanced users.

Wireless Linux group chalks out ambitious plans

Filed under
Linux

reuters.com: Open-source wireless Linux foundation LiMo aims to grow its share of the mobile phone operating system market, dominated by Nokia, by adding about 10 members and launching 20 new models this year.

Why are we pinning Linux desktop hopes on netbooks

Filed under
Linux

infoworld.com: Consumers already have a user experience in mind when using a device focused on personal computing tasks. That experience is largely Microsoft Windows-based.

Ubuntu - Embed a Terminal into Your Desktop using Compiz [Howto]

Filed under
Ubuntu

I guess you could use a screenlet or something similar to embed a terminal into your desktop, but I want to have it transparent, with no titlebar or border and basically to look like my wallpaper has a terminal. For that, i used Compiz and this is what it looks like:

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.8 released

  • I Can Name That Distro in Two Notes
  • Flash isn't going open source, but it may already be more open than Moonlight
  • State IT Agency to host FOSS vendor day
  • Linux Netbooks: What's the Secret Sauce for Sales?
  • How the Debian OpenSSL bug almost spawned a disaster
  • Microsoft’s Linux Rivals Try to Head Off Acrimony
  • Comux 010101
  • The Future Of Gnome DE Looks Promising
  • How Old is that Data on the Hard Drive?
  • The Battle for ODF Interoperability
  • The best Linux disk cloning software - Mephisto Backup 1.5
  • What kept me from sticking to Ubuntu as a desktop solution
  • redhat.com - 2nd round
  • World’s Smallest Computer Runs on Ubuntu
  • ODF Alliance Finds Serious Shortcomings Office 2007 SP2 ODF
  • Video: Open source government
  • Leading Voices - Michael Tiemann, VP of Open Source Affairs at Red Hat
  • Drupal is a Webware 100 winner for the third year in a row
  • about:mozilla 05/19

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Convert Any Video File Format Under Linux

  • Fix Slow Or Hanging Thunderbird Email Client
  • How to install Chromium (Google Chome) on Gentoo Linux
  • Gedit won't save to SSHFS mount, cured
  • Get to know Linux: Removing files
  • How to setup and use YUM on Fedora Linux
  • How to get ath5k working on Jaunty
  • Jargon Jam - Repo
  • Comandline 101: Aliases for Common Commands
  • Debian Lenny 5.0.1 PXE initrd update

The KDE 4.3 beta: KDE Returns to Incremental Releases

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: With the release of the KDE 4.3 beta, the project is returning to incremental releases, and concentrating on customization and ease of use on the desktop, the panel, and system settings.

Musix To My Ears

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: Musix is a Live CD/DVD Linux operating system that is based on the popular Debian distro. Musix focuses on the x86 processor and contains many audio production, graphic design, and general applications.

Hands-on: Intel brings rich UI to Moblin Linux platform

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: Intel has unveiled the next-generation user interface of Moblin, the company's open source Linux platform for netbooks and mobile Internet devices. We tested it on real netbook hardware so that we could give you a detailed hands-on look.

Lundumb

Filed under
OSS

blogbeebe.blogspot: Coward? You're calling Linux Hater a coward? Do you know who the real coward in the Linux community is? Her name is Pamela Jones. Yeah, that Pamela Jones, keeper of Groklaw.

My good ol’ friend PC-BSD 7.1

Filed under
BSD

blog.hydrasystemsllc: While I continue to use GNU/Linux, I still hold an emotional tie to BSD-based operating systems. It was not until recently that I had decided to give the latest version of PC-BSD a try.

Desktop Linux: it ain't a better Windows

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: One debate which the FOSS community will never give up on is the one about GNU/Linux on the desktop. No matter that the two big companies which were once interested in putting GNU/Linux on the desktop have now officially given up.

Linux Hater is an Excuse Lover

Filed under
Linux

lunduke.com: Oh good. Linux Hater has replied to my challenge to stop being anonymous and debate me. And, look at that, it is a numbered list of excuses why he isn’t going to man up.

One week slip of Fedora 11 Release

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: In a meeting today between Release Engineering, QA, and various team leads, we decided to enact a 7 day slip of the Fedora 11 release date.

Slackware64 -current made public!

Filed under
Slack

slackware.com: Ready or not, Slackware has now gone 64-bit with an official x86_64 port being maintained in-sync with the regular x86 -current branch.

Using PHP directly from the command line on Linux and UNIX

Filed under
Linux

Learn how to use PHP directly from the command line on Linux, BSD, Mac OS X (running BSD) or some other flavor of UNIX

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Canonical and Ubuntu

  • RADV & ANV Vulkan Drivers Are One Command Away On Ubuntu 17.04
    Similar to Ubuntu 16.10, the Mesa Vulkan drivers are not present by default on new Ubuntu installations. But to get the packaged Vulkan drivers, simply sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers. When running some tests on Ubuntu 17.04 this weekend, I was a bit surprised to see that Mesa's Intel ANV and Radeon RADV drivers aren't present by default -- since it's been one year since the Vulkan 1.0 debut and the ANV/RADV drivers have matured a lot during this time. There's also more and more software becoming available that can make use of Vulkan while personally wishing for more Linux desktops to push Vulkan. But it's easy to install the Vulkan drivers as mentioned. Similarly, vulkan-utils isn't installed by default.
  • Wishful Thinking Of Non-Free Software Makers
    Regardless of my personal problems with non-Free software, the world has largely accepted FLOSS to SAS’s chagrin. I guess Canonical should be glad except they barely mention “Linux” on their site. What’s with that? They are like some purveyors of non-Free software that talk about the benefits of their products without even mentioning what the software actually does as if that’s best kept secret…
  • 2017: Should Linux Benchmarking Still Be Mostly Done With Ubuntu?
    Every year or so it comes up how some users believe that at Phoronix we should be benchmarking with Antergos/Arch, Debian, or [insert here any other distribution] instead of mostly using Ubuntu for our Linux benchmarking. That discussion has come back up in recent days. In our forums and Twitter the past few days, that discussion seems to have come up by some users requesting I use a different Linux distribution than Ubuntu as the main test platform for all of our benchmarking. As I've said before, Ubuntu is used given it's the most popular when it comes to Linux desktop usage as well as significant usage of it on servers / workstations / cloud. But I have no tie to it beyond focusing upon using the Linux distribution that's used by the most folks for obtaining the maximum relevance to users, gamers, and enthusiasts reading said articles. And for allowing easy comparisons / out-of-the-box expectations. On my main production system I still use Fedora Workstation as my personal favorite and in the basement server room there are a variety of operating systems -- both BSDs and Linux and from Antergos to openSUSE and Debian.

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole