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Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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First LibreOffice Stable Release Nears: What Now?

Filed under
LibO

linux-mag.com: LibreOffice’s first release is near, but what comes next? It’s time for LibreOffice to distinguish itself as more than a clone of Microsoft Office or OpenOffice.org.

How to convert people to Linux

Filed under
Linux
Humor

dedoimedo.com: Now and then, you come across an almost evangelistic article explaining why Linux is the answer to life, the universe and everything, and then elaborating on the methods to borgify the plebes into the collective.

Open Source Landmark

Filed under
Linux

bisnow.com: Red Hat will likely make history this year, becoming the first open source vendor to crack the $1 billion annual revenue mark. Yesterday, we sat down with VP and General Manager Paul Smith, who has grown the company’s federal business from three employees to more than 120 in six years. He tells us this is the golden age for open source in the federal government.

Review: Trisquel 4.0.1 LTS "Taranis"

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: I've read a couple of reviews of Trisquel GNU/Linux, an Ubuntu-based distribution which aims to remove as much non-free (i.e. proprietary) software from the kernel and distribution as possible.

Linux 2.6.38

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 2.6.38 eliminates last main global lock, improving performance
  • Main development phase of Linux kernel 2.6.38 completed

The last 12 months in Ubuntu (and a brief look ahead)

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxuser.co.uk: This has been an interesting year for Ubuntu with two on-schedule releases. Ubuntu community leader, Ubuntu Developer and general a good egg Dave Walker takes a look back at the last 12 months of Ubuntu…

Yet another 5 Ubuntu addictive games

Filed under
Gaming

houcemhachicha.blogspot: My last post about Ubuntu gaming generated alot of interest, and I was kindly asked to write about more cool Ubuntu games. So, here you go, another five Ubuntu games for your pleasure Smile

GNOME 3 website now live, tries a bit too hard to be cool, looks like Unity

Filed under
Software
Web

switched.com: New, clean-and-simple HTML5 websites are obviously in this week: GNOME, one of the most popular desktop environments for Linux, has just released a new website to celebrate the features of version 3, which will be released in April.

Scan Tailor: A Fussy Yet Effective Scan Scrubber

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: It seems that no matter how many times you wipe down the glass on a scanner, the resulting image still has specs, flecks and imperfections galore. That's tolerable for some tasks, but when Linux users want a squeaky-clean scan, Scan Tailor is at their service.

Pinguy OS - An Ubuntu Based Linux Distribution On Steroids

Filed under
Linux

linuxhelp.blogspot: Pinguy OS is targeted at lay persons - people who are going to use Linux for the first time, or those who want an out-of-box working OS. Put in one word - Fabulous!

Forget GNOME and KDE, Xfce 4.8 Runs Simpler and Faster

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: A few times each month, I tire of the complexities of GNOME and KDE. Then I turn to a simpler, faster desktop for a couple of days or a week -- and that desktop, more often than not, is Xfce. No other desktop I’m aware of balances convenience and speed half so well.

Host Based Intrusion Detection - Samhain

Filed under
HowTos

This article describes in some detail how to install Samhain, the host based intrusion detection system. I am not going to ramble on about what host based intrusion detection is or why to use it, as there are plenty of articles already covering those subjects. This article is just to show you how to get Samhain up and running in a client / server configuration with a couple bells and whistles thrown in for fun.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Red Hat Updates RHEL 5 with More Hardware, Software Support
  • The OMG! Ubuntu! Guide to must-have indicator applets
  • lca2011 venue update
  • aseigo: Qt acceptance growing, next: colaboration process?
  • If it sounds mad
  • Debugging ADSL connectivity
  • Open Source in GSM Could Breed Mobile Mayhem
  • Five open source network management projects to watch
  • Free as in Freedom, Episode 0x07
  • Debian Squeeze 6.0 installation screen shots and review
  • SuperTux - A Super Mario Bros Clone
  • RuneScape – Return of Free Trade & The Wilderness
  • Hello English OS! for Learning English.
  • Intel's Linux Sandy Bridge Graphics Still Troubling
  • ODF Interoperability: Maidenhead ODF Plugfest
  • Mandriva and Mythware team up to offer a complete educational solution for OEMs and Schools
  • Why the FSFE is concerned about the sale of Novell’s patents
  • Close To The 50 Day - Red Hat
  • Linux Outlaws 186 - Be Like Dan

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Add transitions with OpenShot Video Editor
  • 3 Command line tool to test bandwidth between 2 servers
  • the Joy of Programming—Penny wise and pound foolish
  • See the value of all your shell's environment variables using env command
  • Convert a Unicode Character into its Hex Codepoint
  • Expect Script Tutorial: Expressions, If Conditions, For Loop, and While Loop Examples
  • What you need to know about OpenSSH key management
  • Create a grunge business card using the Gimp
  • 10 (More) Unknown but Useful Linux Terminal Commands
  • Split And Merge PDF Files With PDF-Shuffler
  • Sending a job to the background and back to the foreground
  • Installing Access Control Lists
  • SpeedUp Ubuntu Unity on Netbooks
  • Create an Eye Catching Energy Drink Advertisement in Blender
  • After Using apt-get Install , Where .deb files are stored?

Exploring Software—Understanding a Netbook Desktop

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Software
Ubuntu

linuxforu.com: Desktop environments are wonderful in the way they just work. The complexity of what is happening ‘below the hood’ is well hidden from us. Looking at the various netbook options, I was curious to understand what it involved to create or modify a netbook desktop experience.

On the Road to Modern OpenGL (ES)

Filed under
KDE
Software

martin-graesslin.com: With KWin GLES shortly before the merge into workspace master (after git transition), it’s time to look back what I promised to deliver half a year ago, when I first talked about the idea of porting KWin to OpenGL ES at Akademy.

50 Open Source Replacements for Storage Software

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Software

earthweb.com: Enterprises and small business don't have to spend a lot of money on their storage solutions. A number of open source projects offer backup, network attached storage (NAS), data warehouse, compression, encryption and other storage-related capabilities. Here are 50.

Interesting Twist in the openSUSE Board Elections

Filed under
SUSE
  • Interesting Twist in the openSUSE Board Elections
  • Novell Files Definitive Proxy Statement: Someone May Be Interested in the Patents and "Maybe More"
  • OBS Books Project

Exclusive interview with Unity’s Technical Lead Neil Patel

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu
  • Exclusive interview with Unity’s Technical Lead Neil Patel
  • News of 'Natty Narwhal' Preview What's Next For Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu's latest OS dissected for the Linux-curious
  • This is one gorgeous Narwhal themed, Natty coloured wallpaper

Open-Source Projects Are Getting Ripped On Amazon

Filed under
Software
  • Open-Source Projects Are Getting Ripped On Amazon
  • The Butterfly-Amazon Open-Source Saga Continues
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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Motion, Contributors, Testday, ActivityMonitor, San Francisco Oxidation

  • Firefox has a motion team?! Yes we do!
    Motion may sometimes feel like an afterthought or worse yet “polish”. For the release of Firefox Quantum (one of our most significant releases to date), we wanted to ensure that motion was not a second class citizen and that it would play an important role in how users perceived performance in the browser. We (Amy & Eric) make up the UX side of the “motion team” for Firefox. We say this in air quotes because the motion team was essentially formed based on our shared belief that motion design is important in Firefox. With a major release planned, we thought this would be the perfect opportunity to have a team working on motion.
  • Firefox 61 new contributors
    With the upcoming release of Firefox 61, we are pleased to welcome the 59 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 53 of whom were brand new volunteers!
  • QMO: Firefox 61 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – June 15th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 61 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place!
  • IOActivityMonitor in Gecko
    This is a first blog post of a series on Gecko, since I am doing a lot of C++ work in Firefox these days. My current focus is on adding tools in Firefox to try to detect what's going on when something goes rogue in the browser and starts to drain your battery life. We have many ideas on how to do this at the developer/user level, but in order to do it properly, we need to have accurate ways to measure what's going on when the browser runs. One thing is I/O activity. For instance, a WebExtension worker that performs a lot of disk writes is something we want to find out about, and we had nothing to track all I/O activities in Firefox, without running the profiler. When Firefox OS was developed, a small feature was added in the Gecko network lib, called NetworkActivityMonitor.
  • San Francisco Oxidation meeting notes
    At last week’s Mozilla All Hands meeting in San Francisco we had an Oxidation meeting about the use of Rust in Firefox. It was low-key, being mostly about status and progress. The notes are here for those who are interested.

Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users
    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots. Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.
  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base
    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.
  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support
    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.
  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux
    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta. I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

"Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp."

  • Mixed Reaction
  • After Github purchase, Microsoft remains a relatively untrusted open source player to some
  • What is GitHub?
    GitHub is now the de facto home of open-source software. But Microsoft’s acquisition reignited a debate over the platform’s centrality. Microsoft assures users the service is safe under its stewardship, but many are wary. When Mr Ballmer spoke of developers, he had a specific sort in mind: those using Microsoft’s tools to build projects for Microsoft products. He once called open-source Linux a “cancer”, which would spread uncontrollably. In a sense, his words proved prophetic: today, open-source software is everywhere, from websites to financial markets to self-driving cars. Under Mr Nadella’s leadership, Microsoft has embraced open-source development. In buying GitHub it hopes to gain the trust of developers it once spurned. But some wonder if the change is complete, or if Microsoft will use its newly bought dominance of open-source hosting to push its own products. Alternatives to GitHub—some themselves open-source—wait in the wings. If it is not careful, Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp.

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now
    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive. If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.
  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing
    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant. It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.