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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Announcing Rust 1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 9:54pm
Story Meizu to Announce Ubuntu Phone on May 18 - Rumor Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 9:24pm
Story Latest Atheros IoT SoCs include OpenWRT-friendly model Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 8:50pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 4:31pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 4:31pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 4:30pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots and Screencasts Roy Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 4:29pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 4:28pm
Story Ubuntu MATE 15.04 Arrives With MATE Desktop 1.8.2 and MATE Tweak Roy Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 4:15pm
Story Top tips for finding free software Roy Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 4:06pm

German goverment to users: Stop using Firefox!

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: The German government has issued a stern warning to telling them not to use Firefox because the browser contains a critical security vulnerability.

Free software's second era: The rise and fall of MySQL

Filed under
OSS

h-online.com: If the first era of free software was about the creation of the fully-rounded GNU/Linux operating system, the second saw a generation of key enterprise applications being written to run on that foundation.

Would Linux Be Better Off Without the FSF?

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Suppose the FOSS community wanted to hire a group to serve as its public relations department -- would the Free Software Foundation be right for the job?

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 346

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: System rescue and virus scanning with Dr.Web LiveCD
  • News: Ubuntu stirs debates over button placement, CrunchBang switches base, Debian presents DPL candidates, LiMux explains migration status, state of four distributions
  • Questions and answers: Restoring deleted files
  • Released last week: Mandriva Enterprise Server 5.1, SystemRescueCd 1.5.0, Parted Magic 4.9
  • Upcoming releases: FreeBSD 7.3, SliTaz GNU/Linux 3.0, Mandriva Linux 2010.1 Beta 1
  • New additions: GhostBSD, Ylmf OS
  • New distributions: infinityOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Freenode Fails.

bheekly.blogspot: Those who use freenode regularly must've been around when for 2-3 days, we all faced massive netsplits due to javascript spam. Funnily enough, the solution for that problem was bloody easy. Dudes. WTF?

rPath Joins Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: The Linux Foundation today announced that rPath is its newest member.

Google promises Chrome is not phoning home with your Web data

Filed under
Google

blogs.techrepublic.com: Despite the fact that I really like the Google Chrome Web browser, I gave up using it last month around the same I gave up Coke Zero. I gave up Coke Zero simply because of the caffeine. My reason for giving up Chrome was a little more complicated.

RIP Palm: it's over, and here's why

Filed under
Hardware

arstechnica.com: So what happened? Wasn't webOS the greatest thing since the original iPhone OS? Wasn't the Pre a great phone? How did Palm blow it so badly?

Making a copyright system that works

Filed under
Legal

FAside from a few vested interests in the entertainment industry, nearly everyone hates the system we’ve got — it’s clearly overreaching and ill-adapted to the electronic world of the internet. But what sort of system would we like?

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Compiz Fusion Status Update
  • 5 Open Source music sharing sites worth knowing
  • 256 colors terminal with tmux and urxvt
  • Installing Ubuntu Linux on a Netbook
  • Fix for - Amarok won't play audio files on Ubuntu
  • Five nice opensource games for Linux
  • Ubuntu loses the human aspect
  • Build a lighter Gnome in Ubuntu
  • DtO: When Alternative Platforms Meet
  • view the performance details of individual CPUs in top
  • Optimise your photos before you send them
  • Convert URLs into links in Gedit with Snippets
  • Latin America leads in school laptops

Commodore 64 Awakes From Slumber With Makeover

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: The vintage Commodore 64 personal computer is getting a makeover, with a new design and the latest version of Ubuntu Linux.

5 Questions for Novell CEO

Filed under
SUSE
  • 5 Questions for Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian
  • Novell Rejects Takeover Bid… But Welcomes Other Bidders
  • More SUSE Linux Appliances Boot Up at Novell BrainShare

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #185

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is Issue #185 for the week March 14th - March 20th, 2010.

KOffice 2.2 Beta 1 Released

Filed under
Software

kdenews.org: The KOffice team is happy to announce the first beta of the upcoming 2.2 release of KOffice. Release 2.2 will be the first release where external companies and organizations have made significant contributions to development.

Q7z: Front end for Linux 7-Zip

Filed under
Software
HowTos

ghacks.net: Compression is compression is compression. Right? Wrong.

Top 10 computer games of all time

Filed under
Gaming

pcauthority.com.au: You know what they say about all work and no play. So this week we've decided to count down the best computer games of all time.

KDE 4.3.4 is lighter than Gnome

Filed under
KDE

linux2u.co.cc: Strange na but its reality KDE 4.3.4 is lighter than Gnome 2.28.I am going to prove it.

Lancleot Part applet is dead…

Filed under
Software

ivan.fomentgroup.org/blog: There were two main problems with the Lancelot Part applet. The first was the name. The second problem was that a lot of users thought that Lancelot Part does nothing.

Giving Samba its due

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: I think I can say this pretty simply: If not for Samba, Linux wouldn’t be where it is today.

Interview: CrunchBang Creator Explains Switch to Debian Sources

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: Regulars on the CrunchBang forum have known for some time that distro leader Philip Newborough was considering ending his creation's Ubuntu foundations, moving instead to being built from Debian. As a Debian fan I'm excited by this change, but I wanted to know a little more.

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More in Tux Machines

LVFS makes Linux firmware updates easier

Traditionally, updating a BIOS or a network card's firmware in Linux meant booting into Microsoft Windows or preparing a MS-DOS floppy disk and hoping everything would work correctly after the update. Periodically searching a vendor website for updates is a manual and error-prone task and not something we should ask users to do. A firmware update service makes it simpler for end users to implement hardware updates. Read more

Mark McIntyre: How Do You Fedora?

Mark McIntyre is a geek by birth and Linux by choice. “I started coding at the early age of 13 learning BASIC on my own and finding the excitement of programming which led me down a path of becoming a professional coder,” he says. McIntyre and his niece are big fans of pizza. “My niece and I started a quest last fall to try as many of the pizza joints in Knoxville. You can read about our progress at https://knox-pizza-quest.blogspot.com/” Mark is also an amateur photographer and publishes his images on Flickr. Read more

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.