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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Camera Pi – How Raspberry Pi can see Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:38pm
Story The Companies That Support Linux: SanDisk Advances Storage Industry Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:35pm
Story Make Firefox for Android Yours: Switch Languages Easily, Customize Home Screens and Clear History Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:22pm
Story Android 4.4 mini-PC packs 64-bit quad-core Atom punch Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:17pm
Story boycott systemd Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:14pm
Story Sharing work is easier with an Open Document Format Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:01pm
Story Tails 1.1.1 is out Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 1:36pm
Story Healthdirect Australia sees value in open source for security solution Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 1:19pm
Story Ubuntu Installer Bug Can Delete Your Hard Drive and All Other OSes Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 1:17pm
Story You have your Windows in my Linux Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 1:16pm

Ubuntu One: Future of Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxhaxor.net: Ubuntu One (pro service) is more expensive than Dropbox and the fact that dropbox client already supports Linux very well that it makes little sense to use Ubuntu One as an online storage service. Unless you consider these facts:

A Quick Tour of GNOME Shell

Filed under
Software

lizards.opensuse.org: I did decide to do a quick tour of the GNOME Shell, one of the integral parts of the GNOME 3 series, scheduled to be coming out in 2010 or so.

Kids belong on Linux netbooks

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Recently, fellow Computerworld blogger, Preston Gralla wrote about a Lenovo analyst who felt that Windows 7 will dominate netbooks, and Linux will fade away. Of course, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols responded that Linux does have a future on netbooks

Open-Source Speech Recognition Platform – Simon Unveiled

Filed under
Software

tmcnet.com: An open-source speech recognition platform called ‘Simon’ has been developed under the General Public License (GPL), in order to serve people with locomotor and cognitive dysfunctions with an advanced speech recognition system (SRC).

Packaging standards, again

Filed under
Software

happyassassin.net: I don’t understand why this debate won’t go away and die already, because it’s fundamentally silly, as anyone who’s actually bothered doing any packaging knows. Why don’t we have a common packaging format? Because we don’t have a common distribution.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mozilla marks June for Firefox 3.5 release candidate

  • openSUSE Weekly News - openSUSE Community Week special edition
  • Konsole Fonts
  • Telethon Taps Open Source to Save on Costs
  • Vincent Danen: My first 90 days at Red Hat
  • Linux development service cracks DaVinci code
  • The Linux VGA Arbiter Has Been Revived
  • R.I.P. Fravia
  • #! CrunchBang Linux Review
  • Testing out Arch Linux
  • Take-Two sues over death of Duke Nukem Forever
  • Fedora Art Team becomes Fedora Design Team
  • Activists push city endorsements of open source
  • Landscape 1.3 released for Ubuntu management
  • KDE 4.3 Beta 1 - looking pretty
  • Ten key web-based Linux tools
  • SimplyMEPIS 8.0 on Toshiba Satellite
  • The EU Parliament still sticks with Microsoft. Here’s why.
  • Elug and SA Linux join forces
  • Ubuntu One; what's in a name?
  • Red Hat 'inevitably' a target -- stock jumps 8%

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using the Bash complete Command

  • Count the Number of Files in a Directory in Linux
  • openSUSE NetworkManager and keyring
  • Lock screen on lid close
  • Command Line Basics: Navigating the File System
  • Browsing a FTP server in Nautilus
  • How to Use the Second Network Port on Your Computer
  • Create your own version of Fedora with Revisor
  • Creating Our First Module using Drupal 6 (Part1)
  • vnstat on openSUSE

Windows 7: 7 Reasons Not to Get too Excited

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxpromagazine.com: It’s official: Windows 7 will be on the shelves just in time for the Christmas season. From an Open Source perspective, this is nothing ground-breaking: It’s just the same old Windows.

USB display technology heading for Linux

Filed under
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: Linux users should soon be able to use USB-connected monitors that incorporate DisplayLink's chips. DisplayLink has released Linux versions of its USB monitor source code under LGPL, and has partnered with Novell and the Linux Driver Project to develop drivers for desktops and mobile devices.

Open Source You Can Use, May 2009 Edition

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com/blog: Sound, video, distros and programming all figure into this month's roundup of open source goodies.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.30 - Storage improvements

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The next kernel version is to provide all that's necessary to convert, for example, a RAID 5 into a RAID 6 and vice versa. There are changes to the block layer designed to speed up the system, and new and improved drivers will offer better SAS support.

Linux Distros That Don’t Suck

Filed under
Linux

tech.nocr.at: I have had many people email me about the best distro out there. The only answer I have for them is “depends on what you want to do”.

When Will it Really Be the Year of Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: It already is. It already has been. It will continue for the forseeable future.

Indamixx Linux Netbook Aims to Be Your Open Source Recording Studio

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com/blog: As noted on the Musician's Friend site, Linux fans with musical abilities may want to take note of the new $499 Indamixx Netbook MKII. It runs a Linux multimedia operating system called Transmission 3.0 that has a set of applications for editing, mixing, and recording music.

Intel, Nokia team on Linux-based phone OS

Filed under
Linux

electronista.com: Intel and Nokia have been discovered as teaming on a new, Linux-based operating system for mobile phones. Labeled as the oFono project, the effort is separate from both companies' usual Linux projects.

Look out IE, Firefox, Chrome is getting much better

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I love Google Chrome. It's faster than fast and I really like the clean, but still helpful, interface.

Fedora considering mailing list moderation

Filed under
Linux

lwn.net: It seems that some folks in the Fedora community are getting tired of the tone of the discussion on the project's mailing lists. Thus this proposal from the Fedora board:

Ubuntu 9.04 is as slick as Windows 7 and Mac OS X

Filed under
Ubuntu

webdotdev.com: Just like Microsoft has taken the blowtorch to Vista to produce the lightning- quick Windows 7 ... Ubuntu has picked up its own game

Linux Poem Contest–Write and Win $5

Filed under
Linux

2indya.com: If you are a Linux enthusiast and love to use open-source, this should excite you. I am a published poet and want to blend this two issues together. I intend to give $5 for the best poem written for Linux.

Security - It's Not Just For Geeks

raiden.net: Ars Technica has an excellent series of articles about user security and why it's important for you to take security seriously, and why it's not just one of those "silly little things" that you leave for the geeks to worry about.

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More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Cheese Talks: Star Wars Games
    This is a collection of excerpts from my recent Cheese Talks project on the history of Star Wars games focusing on titles that are available on Linux in some form or another.
  • A Game Boy emulator for the Apple Watch, RPG Maker comes to Linux, and more gaming news
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  • CrossOver 16.2 Supports Microsoft Outlook 2013, Improves Windows Compatibility
    CodeWeavers' Josh DuBois informed us via an email announcement that the CrossOver 16.2.0 commercial graphical user interface for Wine is now available for GNU/Linux and macOS operating systems. CrossOver 16.2.0 is not a major release of the application that lets Linux and Mac users install and use various apps and games designed for Microsoft Windows, but only a maintenance update that promises to further improve the core Windows compatibility layer, as well as to add better support for some popular applications.

Microsoft v GNU/Linux

  • Illinois residents sue Microsoft over forced Windows 10 upgrades

    The lawyers who have acted on behalf of the trio are looking to have the case expanded to a class action covering every person who has been affected by a forced upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10. They allege that there are thousands of such cases.

    The trio claim that Microsoft uses various tactics to get users to upgrade and does not give them a chance to refuse.

  • New Windows 10 courts govt deals

    The system was developed by its joint venture with China Electronics Technology Group Corp, a State-owned company. Equipped with tailor-made security {sic} features, it is expected to allow the US tech giant to regain access to China's lucrative government software procurement market.

  • Microsoft One Drive Bug In Chrome OS And Linux Fixed

Linux Mint KDE Review: Easy And Beautiful

Linux mint, the most popular Linux distribution is recommended by almost all Linux users for newbies. By default, Linux mint is released with cinnamon. But thanks to the Kubuntu team, we now have a KDE edition. Well, new users are probably wondering what all this KDE thing is? KDE is a community. KDE is a compilation of software. We will look at it in more detail on the way. Mint is a whole distro, so we will look at some specific aspects, But KDE is more than just a DE and we cannot review all of its features here. I will try to cover as much as possible in limited space. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Wins Best DevOps Tool for Open Source at the 2017 DevOps Excellence Awards
  • The goal of HP's radical The Machine: Reshaping computing around memory
    Not every computer owner would be as pleased as Andrew Wheeler that their new machine could run "all weekend" without crashing. But not everyone's machine is "The Machine," an attempt to redefine a relationship between memory and processor that has held since the earliest days of parallel computing. Wheeler is a vice president and deputy labs director at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. He's at the Cebit trade show in Hanover, Germany, to tell people about The Machine, a key part of which is on display in HPE's booth. [...] HPE has tweaked the Linux operating system and other software to take advantage of The Machine's unusual architecture, and released its changes under open source licenses, making it possible for others to simulate the performance of their applications in the new memory fabric.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    Welcome to another very semi-irregular update from the Eudyptula Challenge.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    The Eudyptula Challenge is a series of programming exercises for the Linux kernel. It starts from a very basic "Hello world" kernel module, moves up in complexity to getting patches accepted into the main kernel. The challenge will be closed to new participants in a few months, when 20,000 people have signed up.
  • Daimler Jumps on Linux Bandwagon
    Not long ago, if a major corporation were to take out membership in an open source project, that would be big news -- doubly so for a company whose primary business isn't tech related. Times have changed. These days the corporate world's involvement in open source is taken for granted, even for companies whose business isn't computer related. Actually, there's really no such thing anymore. One way or another, computer technology is at the core of nearly every product on the market. So it wasn't surprising that hardly anyone noticed earlier this month when Daimler AG, maker of Mercedes-Benz and the world's largest manufacturer of commercial vehicles, announced it had joined the Open Invention Network (OIN), an organization that seeks to protect open source projects from patent litigation. According to a quick and unscientific search of Google, only one tech site covered the news, and that didn't come until a full 10 days after the announcement was made.
  • ONAP: Raising the Standard for NFV/SDN Telecom Networks [Ed: Amdocs pays the Linux Foundation for editorial control and puff pieces]
    This article is paid for by Amdocs...
  • Plamo 6.2 リリース
    Plamo 6.2 をリリースしました。
  • Dominique Leuenberger: [Tumbleweed] Review of the week 2017/12
    What a week! Tumbleweed once again is the first (to my knowledge) to ship the just released GNOME 3.24.0 as part of its main repository. Being shipped to the users in less than 48 hours since the official release announcement is something we can only do thanks to all the automatic building and testing AND the efforts put into the packages! If packagers would not be at the ball the whole time, this would not be possible. Even though the week has seen ‘only’ 4 snapshots (0317, 0318, 0320 and 0322) the changes delivered to the user base is enormous.
  • VMware Workstation 12.x.x for latest openSUSE Tumbleweed
  • Zero Terminal Mini Linux Laptop Created Using Raspberry Pi Zero W And Smartphone Keyboard
  • Zero Terminal: A DIY handheld Linux PC made from a Raspberry Pi and a cheap iPhone keyboard accessory