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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Latest Ubuntu SDK Release Drops All Qt Dependencies, Supports Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 10:11am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 10:10am
Story Keeping the peace: KDE board chair's recipe Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 9:56am
Story Debian daddy Murdock joins the unstoppable Docker crusade Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 9:52am
Story The Linux Setup - Sean Davis, Xubuntu Lead Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 9:50am
Story SIVEO joins the Mageia community to boost the development of the PULSE software Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 9:49am
Story Refined player: Fedora 23's workin' it like Monday morning Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 9:47am
Story DockerCon and Servers Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 9:42am
Story Bodhi 3.1.1 Released, Fedora 21 EOL, Mint 17.3 Betas Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 2:21am
Story MagicStick and More Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 2:07am

Can Linux Open-Xchange Replace Microsoft Exchange?

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Whether you're replacing Microsoft Exchange or just looking for a competent groupware suite, Open-Xchange is one of the leading contenders for Linux. How does it rate? Very well, with a few caveats.

Another Ubuntu-powered tablet appears

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: GizChina have posted news of another new (albeit dual-booting) Ubuntu tablet.

Another Look At The Latest Nouveau Gallium3D Driver

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this month I reported on good and bad news for the Nouveau Gallium3D driver with the good news being that for the hardware that played well with this reverse-engineered open-source driver, the OpenGL performance was not too bad in most instances compared to NVIDIA's official proprietary driver.

The Perfect PC

Filed under
Linux
Software

thefridayblog.com: A couple of weeks ago I rebuilt my writing PC using Debian Squeeze and lxde. I wrote about it here and mentioned that I was so impressed with the performance that I was thinking about rebuilding my current main PC in the same way.

First experiences with the OpenSUSE Build Service

Filed under
SUSE

blixtra.org/blog: As part of my Openismus training, I was recently tasked with packaging a Qt application using the OpenSUSE Build Service (OBS). Here I’ll try to note my first impressions as well as offer some solutions to problems I encountered.

3 Photo collage programs on Linux

Filed under
Software

linuxaria.com: It happens every now and then you have a set of photos and you want to do with them a background image with a collage of them, or perhaps a mosaic, it’s possible in Linux?

Live Out Adventure and Conquest In the Battle for Wesnoth

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: Years ago, when I was in high school, I remember getting very addicted to turn-based adventure strategy games like the popular Ultima series.

Tux Planet, an awesome source for Linux wallpapers

Filed under
Software

cristalinux.blogspot: I recently stumbled with this great French site, which contains some of the most amazing Linux wallpapers I have found. Many Linux distributions are featured, including the usual suspects, like Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Fedora, but also some other distros.

Bodhi Linux is Blossoming

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Not even three months ago Bodhi Linux was nothing more than a thought in my mind. Today Bodhi is a thriving young project. If you have visited our team page lately or seen our news posts then you know our small team has been steadily growing.

A second Opera 11.00 final build for Linux/FreeBSD

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: We have just pushed a new Opera 11.00 release for Linux and FreeBSD to our ftp, deb and download servers. The reason we're doing this is that we just realized that the signing key for Debian packages expires the 23rd this month.

Hell Freezes Over: First Debian 6, Now...

Filed under
Gaming
  • Duke Nukem Forever to ship May 3
  • Duke Nukem Forever release date revealed
  • Duke Nukem Forever gets a release date

Why I Use Gentoo Linux

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.calindora.com: I’ll admit it right here: Gentoo is my primary operating system and remains my favorite distribution of Linux. That’s not to say I haven’t experimented with others. Arch, Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu have all been installed on my machines at one point or another. I’ve used Exherbo, and I think it has a lot of promise. Even so, I’ve always ended up back using Gentoo. What keeps drawing me back?

Openfire: Excellent, free open source chat server

Filed under
Software

infoworld.com: Easy install, easy administration, and ease-of-use make Jabber-based Openfire an ideal choice for small deployments

Sun's open source legacy

Filed under
OSS

h-online.com: The aftermath of Oracle's purchase of Sun and the subsequent forking of a number of open source projects, has highlighted the necessity to protect the integrity of the commons and to keep commercially sponsored open source projects honest, and true to the principles of free and open source software.

The openSUSE column #96 with Jos Poortvliet

Filed under
SUSE

linuxuser.co.uk: openSUSE community manager, Jos Poortvliet, talks about the latest in openSUSE projects and developments since the successful openSUSE Conference last October…

yesterday's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Revisited: 3 Newbie-Friendly KDE Distributions
  • Hacking, Old-School
  • So long, Drupal 5.x (End of Life Announcement)
  • How to Install VirtualBox 4.0.2 on Ubuntu 10.10
  • Easily Search And Manage PPAs With Y PPA Manager
  • There's No FUD Like an Old FUD
  • Installing a Debian GNU/Linux test server with VirtualBox
  • Expect Script Tutorial: Expressions, If Conditions, For Loop, and While Loop
  • How to make a great pattern in GIMP
  • Creating dynamic volumes with loop devices
  • How to Advertise your FOSS game
  • Add titles to OpenShot Video Editor projects
  • MySQL: Drive Your Performance Problems Away!
  • Diff with vimdiff
  • Text Watermarking and Watermark Recovery - Snowdrop
  • MintCast Interview
  • Radio Tray 0.6.2 comes with resume parameter, application indicator
  • Stuck in Windows
  • Moving duplicity (and Deja-Dup) backups
  • Ubuntu Laptop How to save current screen brightness settings
  • Search is One of the Strengths of GNU/Linux
  • Shadow Clones is a Fun Alien Shooter with Nice Soundtrack
  • Use the Levels Adjustment Tool in digiKam

Icinga (Monitoring Solution) Installation And Configuration On CentOS

Filed under
HowTos

Icinga is an enterprise grade open source monitoring system which keeps watch over networks and any conceivable network resource, notifies the user of errors and recoveries and generates performance data for reporting. Scalable and extensible, Icinga can monitor complex, large environments across dispersed locations.

There's No Such Thing As Web Standards

Filed under
Software
Web
  • The Truth Comes Out: There's No Such Thing As Web Standards
  • HTML Versioning Eliminated

Introducing Andreas

Filed under
Software

press.redhat.com: Red Hat provides an industry-leading support experience for thousands of open source applications and solutions. An exciting addition to Red Hat’s Support delivery capabilities is a new fault detection framework, Andrea.

Why would anyone use vim?

Filed under
Software

mikethecoder.com: I recently switched to vim full time after years of asking myself that question. It seemed like a huge percentage of the better hackers I came across used vim, but all I could see was “no mouse, no IDE goodies, no deal.” Why would anyone subject themselves to that? Here's why:

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement
    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly. "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."
  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]
     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM
    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.
  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers
    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM. Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged
    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.
  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop
    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems. In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.
  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3
    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.
  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019
    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference. The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.
  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support
    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4. Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.

Software, KDE and GNOME Leftovers

  • Drawing Feynman Diagrams for Fun and Profit with JaxoDraw
    When first developed, theoretical physics was mostly done either with pen and paper or on a chalkboard. Not much thought was given as to how you could render these drawings within a document being written on a computer. JaxoDraw is meant to help fill in that gap in document layout and provide the ability to render these drawings correctly and give output you can use in your own documents. JaxoDraw is written in Java, so it should run under almost any operating system. Unfortunately, it isn't likely to be in the package repository for most distributions, so you'll need to download it from the project's website. But, because it's packaged as a jar file, it's relatively easy to run.
  • Kodi v18 Leia - Alpha 2
    We have been relatively quiet for a while and several months have past since the first pre-release Alpha build. Today we present you the second official Alpha build in this pre-release trilogy. It is a continuation of the first one which was released beginning of March and contains our continous battle against the dark side that consist of bugs and usability problems.
  • Kodi 18 Alpha 2 Released With Stability & Usability Improvements + New Wayland Code
    It's been a few months since the Kodi 18 Alpha while available today is the second alpha release of this major update to the open-source, cross-platform HTPC software. Kodi developers have been spending the past few months working on a range of stability and usability enhancements to this software formerly known as XBMC. Kodi 18's latest additions include live TV viewing improvements, Windows support improvements, continued Android integration enhancements, re-introducing Wayland protocol support, video player enhancements, and more.
  • LibreOffice color selector as GTK widgets
    Here's what the native GTK widget mode for the color picker looks like at the moment under Wayland. A GtkMenuButton displaying a color preview of the currently selected color and a GtkPopover containing the color selection widgetry.
  • TenFourFox FPR8 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 final is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). There are no changes from the beta except for outstanding security patches. As usual, it will go live Monday night, assuming no changes.
KDE:
  • Latte Dock, Beta 1 for v0.8 (v0.7.95)
    Hello everyone Latte Dock v0.7.95 which is the first beta of v0.8 is here. Latte v0.8 is a huge release and one of its main goals is to make the user feel with it very natural and comfortable. [...] Important for contributors: Beta1 will last 10 days, during these days translators will be able to report string improvements at bugs.kde.org. English isnt my native language, (proof reading / simpler expanations) might be necessary. When Beta2 is released around 3 to 5 July the string freeze will take place. Beta2 period will last 10 more days. So v0.8 is scheduled for 13 to 15 Jully. During all these days improvements and fixes can be landed through review process at kde phabricator.
  • Musing About Communities Size And Activity
    If you remember my previous installment I raised a couple more questions which I pointed out as tougher to address and I'd keep on the side for a while. Well, I decided to look at something simpler in the meantime... which unexpectedly took more time than expected. First I thought I'd try to reproduce the cohesion graph from Paul's Akademy 2014 talk... but it looks like we have a reproducibility issue on that one. However hard I try I don't manage to reproduce it. What I get is very different, so either there's a bug in my tentative script or there was a bug in Paul's script or somehow the input data is different. So one more mysteries to explore, I'm at a loss about what's going on with that one so far.
  • Second Post and First Weekly
    Because of the last one, I have been refactoring related code in the last month. The refactoring is generally completed, with KisDlgInternalColorSelector being the last dependency that haven’t been moved to enable KisPaletteView to be used everywhere needed.
GNOME:
  • Ubuntu Developers Working On Improvements To GNOME Software Store
    Canonical/Ubuntu developers are working on improvements to the GNOME Software "app store" and recently held an in-person design sprint along with one upstream GNOME developer for coming up with improvements. The Ubuntu developers working on improvements to GNOME Software were joined by prolific GNOME contributor Richard Hughes for brainstorming improvements to better GNOME Software over the months to come.
  • App Launching From GNOME Shell Now More Robust Under Memory Pressure & Faster
    Right now on systems with low amounts of available system memory, GNOME Shell can sometimes fail to launch applications due to an error over not being able to allocate memory in the fork process. With the latest rounds of Glib optimizations, this should no longer be the case.
  • GNOME Web Browser is Adding a Reader Mode
    An experimental reader mode will ship in the next version of GNOME Web, aka Epiphany. The feature is already available to try in the latest development builds of the GTK Webkit-based web browser, released this week as part of the GNOME 3.29.3 milestone.

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