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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Is Linux right for you? Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2015 - 7:49am
Story 4MLinux 13.0 Allinone Edition and 4MLinux 13.0 Enter Beta with GCC 5.1 Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 11:19pm
Story MakuluLinux Aero Released ! Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 11:17pm
Story Basic code completion for Rust in KDE's Kate (and later KDevelop) Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 11:15pm
Story Welcome to Parsix GNU/Linux 7.5r0 Release Notes Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 11:13pm
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 7.5r0 Released with Linux Kernel 3.14.41 LTS and GNOME 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 11:08pm
Story Tiny Core Linux 6.3 Release Candidate 1 Now Ready for Testing Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 11:04pm
Story Linux 4.0.4 Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 10:57pm
Story Linux Mint Debian Users Can Now Upgrade to Linux Mint Debian 2 Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 8:45pm
Story Meizu Announces Ubuntu MX4 for Developers Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2015 - 8:28pm

Freenode Fails.

bheekly.blogspot: Those who use freenode regularly must've been around when for 2-3 days, we all faced massive netsplits due to javascript spam. Funnily enough, the solution for that problem was bloody easy. Dudes. WTF?

rPath Joins Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: The Linux Foundation today announced that rPath is its newest member.

Google promises Chrome is not phoning home with your Web data

Filed under
Google

blogs.techrepublic.com: Despite the fact that I really like the Google Chrome Web browser, I gave up using it last month around the same I gave up Coke Zero. I gave up Coke Zero simply because of the caffeine. My reason for giving up Chrome was a little more complicated.

RIP Palm: it's over, and here's why

Filed under
Hardware

arstechnica.com: So what happened? Wasn't webOS the greatest thing since the original iPhone OS? Wasn't the Pre a great phone? How did Palm blow it so badly?

Making a copyright system that works

Filed under
Legal

FAside from a few vested interests in the entertainment industry, nearly everyone hates the system we’ve got — it’s clearly overreaching and ill-adapted to the electronic world of the internet. But what sort of system would we like?

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Compiz Fusion Status Update
  • 5 Open Source music sharing sites worth knowing
  • 256 colors terminal with tmux and urxvt
  • Installing Ubuntu Linux on a Netbook
  • Fix for - Amarok won't play audio files on Ubuntu
  • Five nice opensource games for Linux
  • Ubuntu loses the human aspect
  • Build a lighter Gnome in Ubuntu
  • DtO: When Alternative Platforms Meet
  • view the performance details of individual CPUs in top
  • Optimise your photos before you send them
  • Convert URLs into links in Gedit with Snippets
  • Latin America leads in school laptops

Commodore 64 Awakes From Slumber With Makeover

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: The vintage Commodore 64 personal computer is getting a makeover, with a new design and the latest version of Ubuntu Linux.

5 Questions for Novell CEO

Filed under
SUSE
  • 5 Questions for Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian
  • Novell Rejects Takeover Bid… But Welcomes Other Bidders
  • More SUSE Linux Appliances Boot Up at Novell BrainShare

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #185

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is Issue #185 for the week March 14th - March 20th, 2010.

KOffice 2.2 Beta 1 Released

Filed under
Software

kdenews.org: The KOffice team is happy to announce the first beta of the upcoming 2.2 release of KOffice. Release 2.2 will be the first release where external companies and organizations have made significant contributions to development.

Q7z: Front end for Linux 7-Zip

Filed under
Software
HowTos

ghacks.net: Compression is compression is compression. Right? Wrong.

Top 10 computer games of all time

Filed under
Gaming

pcauthority.com.au: You know what they say about all work and no play. So this week we've decided to count down the best computer games of all time.

KDE 4.3.4 is lighter than Gnome

Filed under
KDE

linux2u.co.cc: Strange na but its reality KDE 4.3.4 is lighter than Gnome 2.28.I am going to prove it.

Lancleot Part applet is dead…

Filed under
Software

ivan.fomentgroup.org/blog: There were two main problems with the Lancelot Part applet. The first was the name. The second problem was that a lot of users thought that Lancelot Part does nothing.

Giving Samba its due

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: I think I can say this pretty simply: If not for Samba, Linux wouldn’t be where it is today.

Interview: CrunchBang Creator Explains Switch to Debian Sources

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: Regulars on the CrunchBang forum have known for some time that distro leader Philip Newborough was considering ending his creation's Ubuntu foundations, moving instead to being built from Debian. As a Debian fan I'm excited by this change, but I wanted to know a little more.

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS “Lucid Lynx” Preview

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04 LTS “Lucid Lynx” Preview
  • Ubuntu Linux- In need of a unique identity
  • Build a lightweight graphical system in Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.10 Desktop switch with mouse wheel
  • Ubuntu drifting away from open source?
  • How to remove social network features but keep sound applet
  • Use your favorite video as an animated background in Ubuntu
  • Data loss after update

Virtualization With VirtualBox 3.1.x On A Headless Mandriva 2010.0 Server

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This guide explains how you can run virtual machines with Sun VirtualBox 3.1.x on a headless Mandriva 2010.0 server. Normally you use the VirtualBox GUI to manage your virtual machines, but a server does not have a desktop environment. Fortunately, VirtualBox comes with a tool called VBoxHeadless that allows you to connect to the virtual machines over a remote desktop connection, so there's no need for the VirtualBox GUI.

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Hidden Linux : Installing groups of software
  • How To allow access to IMs through Squid Proxy
  • Set up a keyboard layout for Xorg
  • Mozilla Engineer Writes Steve Ballmer to take Foot Out Of Mouth
  • Check that a physical link is up with the proper speed
  • Quake 2 on netbook with custom resolution, finally!
  • LCA 2010 Videos available
  • Fedora Constantine, SYSRQ and needless swapping
  • lbzip2: parallel bzip2 utility
  • How to install perl module without root or super user
  • How to recover from corrupt rpm database on RHEL/CentOS/Fedora
  • KDE at Solutions Linux 2010
  • Google Gets Into The 3D Driver Game
  • disable the “Your battery may be old or broken” notification
  • How to configure the network connection on Mandriva 2010

GIMP 2.8 development still under control

Filed under
GIMP

chromecode.com: A while back I announced the creation of a schedule for GIMP 2.8 development. I've made sure to keep this schedule up to date, and after a bunch of initial adjustments such as postponing some feature and adding others, the schedule has now stabilized a bit.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

Servers and Red Hat