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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Windows Guy Tries Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux

10minutetech.net: After our initial foray into the Linux world with openSuse 11, my plan had been to try Mandriva Spring 2008. It’s still in the cards, but based on the overwhelming support that Linux Mint got in the comment section, I decided that maybe that should be my next Distro to examine.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • With Linux, Even Rootkits Are Open Source

  • openSuSe - A Linux Distro worth setting your eye on
  • Linux Void Episode 6
  • Akademy 2008 was Amazing
  • Open Document Formats finally default for Yale Law School A2K Conference
  • Zonker: Picking the Fleas from Community
  • On Alphas and Betas
  • Open source and military procurement don’t mix
  • Acer Perspire One
  • Red Hat: The hypervisor will be free
  • Community service for free software users
  • Finding Linux Systems Where They Never Were Found Before
  • 'The WFTL Show', Episode 3
  • Released GoblinX XFlash 2008.2
  • Ubuntu 8.10: Compuz-Fusion Cube Deformation

Opera 9.6 beta released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: We released Opera 9.6 beta today. We fixed 2 issues after the RC and added Ukranian language file. Fixed: Sessions broken after crash and FCKeditor Demo didn't load (broke alot of other stuff as well).

GNU Planet!

Filed under
Web

fsf.org/blogs: You can keep up to date with all your favorite GNU projects, via their individual RSS news feeds, but if you'd prefer to see a wider view, be sure to check out the new GNU Planet.

To All Chicago Cubs and Linux Fans: A Tale of Two Analyst Perspectives

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin: This week week we saw news centered around two studies on desktop computing trends: one from Forrester Research and one from IDC. Both reports come from highly regarded firms and both seem to point to contradictory trends.

The Market Loves Linux (That's Why It's Thriving)

Filed under
Linux

lewrockwell.com: My wife often rolls her eyes at me, because once I find a new hobby I latch onto it as though life depended on it. The more arbitrary the nature of the hobby, the less she's impressed with it. So imagine her immense delight when, a year ago, the only thing I would talk about with her was Linux.

NEBC Bio-Linux distro falls short

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: As the fields of computational biology and bioinformatics become more important, not only to the economy, but to our understanding of the natural world and ourselves, Linux is becoming a better platform on which to build and deploy the software scientists will rely on. A few groups have even gone so far as to create entire distributions geared for computational biolog. One of the more prominent comes from Oxford's National Environmental Research Council's (NERC) Environmental Bioinformatics Centre (NEBC). Bio-Linux does not sell itself as your average distribution, but it does not measure up to an average distribution either.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Creating business cards the easy way (Linux)

  • Howto: Accessing VirtualBox VDI Disks on the Host Computer
  • Tracking your tasks at the command line
  • Changing Your User Information in Ubuntu Linux
  • How-To: Install Video Codecs and DVD Support in Ubuntu/Kubuntu 8.04
  • Optimize Firefox’s memory usage by tweaking session preferences
  • Turn your machine into enterprise storage with Openfiler
  • How to Run Linux from an USB Flash Drive In 5 minutes!

Grumpy Gnome-Hater Almost Changes Mind

Filed under
Software

Carla Schroder: I used to think that Gnome 1.4 was the Last Good Gnome. Because when Gnome 2.0 came along, everything I liked was gone. It was dumbed-down to the point of unusability, and the roadmap called for yet more dumbing-down. So I switched to KDE.

Second Life recognizes open source community with 2008 awards

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Linden Lab, creator of the online virtual space Second Life, recognized the accomplishments of outstanding individuals in its open source community this week at its Linden Lab Innovation Awards. Seven winners were announced at a "mixed reality" ceremony held both at a convention center in Florida and simultaneously within the Second Life system.

Large Hadron Collider - powered by Linux

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

blog.internetnews.com: The most powerful physics project in the history of the known universe - The $10 Billion Large Hadron Collider (LHC)- shot its first light speed beam this morning around its 27 km circuit. Beyond the 20 years it took to build and half of all the world's astrophysicists, it also takes another key ingredient to make LHC work -- Linux.

$98 Linux laptop makes Netbooks look pricey

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

cnet.com: Move aside OLPCs and Intel Classmate PCs, there's a new cheapo notebook in town. For a mere $98, Chinese manufacturer HiVision is offering a Linux-based laptop, the NB0700, which makes even Netbook buyers look like big spenders.

Me and My Cowon iAudio D2

kdubois.net: So I’ve never really owned an mp3 player before, however, with my Openmoko Freerunner being unusable as a media player*, I decided to go and buy a real mp3 player. Here’s my impressions from using it for a week.

Ubuntu Saves Compaq Presario 2100 From Death and Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Ubuntu Linux saved a Compaq Presario 2100 from certain death last weekend. Here’s the horror story and the happy outcome. For all of you with aging, slow-running Windows systems, I hope this quick blog post inspires you to breathe new life into the system by installing Ubuntu.

Survey: 96 percent of enterprises not deploying Ubuntu server

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matt Asay: Goldman Sachs September 2008 IT spending survey delivers a sobering blow to suggestions of the rise of Ubuntu: The enterprise isn't seeing it yet.

Faster application launching with GNOME-Do and GNOME Deskbar

Filed under
Software

linux.com: GNOME enthusiasts have a couple of good options when it comes to searching, launching, and otherwise manipulating and accessing files, applications, and information right from the desktop: GNOME-Do, and the GNOME Deskbar applet.

The Ubuntu Look Can be Changed, but Linux CAN NOT have a “Look”.

Filed under
Linux

internetling.com: A Linux distro is basically someone saying: here’s a collection of packages that works well together, now keep it or change it as you wish. Oh I get it, if GNU/Linux can’t make the user drool when he sees a Linux desktop, we’ll never get a large userbase. Here’s what I think.

5 Best Free and Open-source Real-time Strategy Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.com: Recently, I have tried a few free and open-source RTS games and was really impressed with some of them. The best thing is that I can play them instantly on my Linux box without the need for Wine and without having to spend a single dime.

How Linux is keeping Microsoft honest

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Imagine a world without Linux. There'd be no cute Tux penguin or any notion of software freedom day. Netbooks would not have come about. But more strikingly, there wouldn't be the modern powerful tools that Windows systems administrators have come to love. That's right; Linux is keeping Microsoft honest.

Fedora 8 and 9 updates re-enabled

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: In a few hours, updates for Fedora 8 and Fedora 9 will start hitting mirrors. These updates are designed to transition users from our old repo locations to new locations that have all our updates re-signed with a new set of keys.

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More in Tux Machines

New Releases

  • Security-Oriented Qubes OS 3.2 Improves the Integrated Management Infrastructure
    Today, September 29, 2016, Joanna Rutkowska announced the general availability of the second point release of the Qubes OS 3 stable series of the security-oriented and open-source Linux-based computer operating system. Qubes OS 3.2 is a maintenance release, which means that it mostly adds general fixes and improvements to various of the distribution's core components and functionalities, including the integrated management infrastructure that was introduced as part of the previous update, Qubes 3.1, allowing users to also manage the "insides" of a virtual machine.
  • Alpine Linux 3.4.4 Is Out, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.22 LTS, OpenSSL Patches
    Today, September 28, 2016, Alpine Linux creator and lead developer Natanael Cop has the pleasure of announcing the release of the fourth maintenance update to the latest stable Alpine Linux 3.4 server-oriented operating system series. Alpine Linux 3.4.4 is out as the most advanced version, powered by the recently released, long-term supported Linux 4.4.22 kernel and bringing up-to-date components to make your Alpine Linux-based server(s) more stable and reliable than ever. Most of the core components have been updated, but the most important one is OpenSSL 1.0.2j, which received the latest security fixes, just like in the rest of the GNU/Linux distros.

Leftovers: Software

  • Web Publishing and Development: Free Tools Abound
    Are you involved in DevOps and web development, or are you aiming to be? If so, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find our latest roundup of free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6.1 Released
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 Adds a Dark Theme, Notification Muting
  • GNOME Calendar Pencils In Great New Features
    GNOME Calendar is one of the few decent desktop calendaring apps available on Linux — and it's going to get better.
  • The future of GNOME Calendar
    Today, the Calendar Team had the first meeting in history. Isaque, Lapo, Renata, Vamsi and I attended it, and the meeting was extremely productive! In fact, we were able to sketch out the general direction that GNOME Calendar will head towards.

More Android Leftovers

  • ​Google beats back Oracle again in Java Android case
    To recap, Oracle claimed the 37 Java application programming interface (API) packages Google used to develop Android are covered by copyright. Of course, that's not really the issue. True, the the US Federal Circuit Court of Appeals foolishly ruled that APIs could be copyrighted. But the US District Court for the Northern District of California ruled in May 2016 that Google's use of the Java APIs were not subject to copyright licensing fees. Instead, Android's use of the APIs was covered by "fair use."
  • Google’s Open Source Fuchsia OS: The Mystery Linux Distro
    Few things are more tantalizing than a good mystery, and Google is making waves for an open source-centric mystery that may end up having profound implications. It all started in August when an extensive and unusual code repository for a new operating system called Fuchsia was discovered online, and now the growing source code set is on GitHub. Thus far, Google officials have been mostly mum on the aim of this operating system, although they have made a few things clear in chat forums. Two developers listed on Fuchsia's GitHub page — Christopher Anderson and Brian Swetland — are known for their work with embedded systems. The Verge, among other sites, has made a few logical deductions about the possible embedded systems focus for Fuchsia: “Looking into Fuchsia's code points gives us a few clues. For example, the OS is built on Magenta, a “medium-sized microkernel” that is itself based on a project called LittleKernel, which is designed to be used in embedded systems,” the site reports. The GitHub postings that confirm that Fuchsia is based on Magenta are particularly notable because Magenta has had applications in the embedded systems space. Here are some direct quotes: "Magenta is a new kernel that powers the Fuchsia OS. Magenta is composed of a microkernel as well as a small set of userspace services, drivers, and libraries necessary for the system to boot, talk to hardware, load userspace processes and run them, etc. Fuchsia builds a much larger OS on top of this foundation."
  • As Blackberry pulls out of handset business it has some big patent strategy calls to make

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Budgie-Remix Makes Progress With Ubuntu 16.10 Base, Beta 2 Released
    Budgie-Remix, the unofficial Ubuntu spin making use of the Budgie Desktop, has released its 16.10 Beta 2 milestone following this week's Yakkety Yak Beta 2 release. Budgie-Remix is re-based to the latest Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety package changes. In addition, a number of the Budgie-0Remix packages have been working their way into Debian proper and thus are available to Ubuntu 16.10 users via the official channels. Now available this way is the budgie-desktop package, Moka icon theme, Faba icon theme, and the Arc theme. The Ubuntu repository has also pulled in the Budgie artwork and wallpaper packages too.
  • Yakkety Yak Final Beta Released
  • Canonical Launches Commercial Support for Kubernetes
    Canonical, the lead commercial vendor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, is getting into the Kubernetes market. Canonical now offers a freely available implementation of Kubernetes as well as commercial-support options. "I have no doubt that Kubernetes will be one of the major container co-ordination systems," Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, told ServerWatch.
  • [How To] Build an Ubuntu Controlled Sous-Vide Cooker
    I’ll be honest with you from the off: I had zero idea what sous-vide cooking was before I started writing this post. Wikipedia dutifully informs me that’s Sous-Vide is a style of cooking that involves a vacuum, bags, and steam.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro Linux Mini PC Launches For $395
    This week a new version of the popular Mintbox Mini Linux PC has been launched for $395 in the form of the Mintbox Mini Pro which is now equipped with 120 GB of SSD mSATA together with 64-bit AMD A10-Micro6700T system-on-a-chip with Radeon R6 graphics and features 8GB of DDR3L. The latest Mintbox Mini Pro is shipped preloaded with the awesome Linux Mint 18 operating system and includes a microSD card slot a serial port, and a micro SIM card reader. The new Mintbox Mini Pro is the same size as the original and measures 4.3 x 3.3 x 0.9 inches in size and weighs in at around 255g. The Linux mini PC incorporates a fanless design and features an all-metal case made of aluminium and zinc.