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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Stable kernels 3.14.6, 3.10.42, and 3.4.92 Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:42pm
Story Tango Studio 2.2 Is a Distro for Musicians and Professional Studios Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:27pm
Story IT’S HERE: DOCKER 1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:21pm
Story Wireless speakers run Linux, control IoT stuff Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:13pm
Story F2FS Gets Enhanced For The Linux 3.16 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:12pm
Story Reports Cites Google Surpassing Microsoft in Browser Market Share Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:01pm
Story Superb Interstellar Marines Tactical FPS Arrives on Steam for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:41pm
Story CyanogenMod 11.0 M7 Released Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:35pm
Story GNOME Board of Directors Elections 2014 - Preliminary Results Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:30pm
Story Quick Look: Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:25pm

Take note - small is beautiful

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

irishtimes.com: THERE WAS a time when the only way to really be mobile with a computer was with a laptop. Then came what were termed sub-notebooks. But with the rise of the internet, much of the computing power we need has moved to the web, hence the emergence of the netbooks.

Upgrading Mandriva 2009.0 to CentOS 5.2

Filed under
Linux

linsec.ca/blog: Well, technically speaking, I guess this is a bit of a downgrade. But, since I’m not longer using Mandriva and need to get used to Red Hat products (Fedora, RHEL, etc.), CentOS makes sense for upgrading my internal server to.

Registering your shiny new HP Mini-Note 2133

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

lizards.opensuse: So you just got an HP Mini-Note 2133 pre-loaded with SLED 10? Great, right? If you attempt to use YaST to register you copy of SLED on the 2133, you’ll be re-directed to a “special” Novell Customer Center login. It simply refreshes the page when you click submit and sends nothing to Novell.

Smolt Desktop Profiler from Fedora

Filed under
Gentoo
Software

duckzland.ismywebsite: This is exactly one feature that gentoo should integrate in its wiki page. Smolt will get your hardware profile, profile such as what is your audio card, video card and cpu hardware.

Opera Responds to Challenges from Open Source Browsers

Filed under
Software

webworkerdaily.com: Opera has always had its own fiercely loyal set of fans, but there actually have been some recent benchmark face-offs including it, and it was starting to look like Opera is falling behind.

Open Source Advocates Alarmed By Mickos's Sun Exit

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com: The fiscal impact may come if customers conclude that his departure means there's been a significant dilution of the MySQL brain trust at Sun.

ext4: The Fourth Extended Filesystem

Filed under
Software

kyleabaker.com: The ext4 file system is to be the successor to the ext3 journaled file system. The ext4 file system is now, as of December 25, 2008, released as stable and can be used as the dominant file system without fear of data loss.

Mandriva Linux: What Windows should be

Filed under
MDV

blog.stablephp: For the last 15 or more years I have been waiting for Linux to be as user frienly as Windows. Now, I am finally satisfied.

PCLinuxOS-N1PTT-TR6 Finally Released

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos.com: The Ripper Gang is pleased to announce the first public beta ISO release of what will ultimately become PCLinuxOS 2009. This beta iso features kernel 2.6.26.8.tex3, KDE 3.5.10, Open Office 3.0, and Firefox 3.0.5.

10 obscure Linux applications you need to try

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: With thousands of Linux tools out there, it stands to reason that some of the very best ones might get lost in the crowd. Jack Wallen introduces some excellent apps that more admins should know about.

Fatal Windows 7 Flaw Will Bolster Linux Netbooks

Filed under
Microsoft

workswithu.com: I think Microsoft has done a reasonably good job developing Windows 7. Most early buzz about the operating system was positive. But when it comes to running Windows 7 on netbooks, Microsoft has made a fatal design decision that will open the door for more Linux netbooks.

You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: "You get what you pay for" is a common FUDphrase used to discredit Linux and FOSS, because so much of it is available free of cost. Which scares the purveyors of overpriced crapware, who would rather walk barefoot through broken glass and burning dung than write software that customers actually feel happy paying for.

Embracing Change: The Linux Paradigm

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: It's time to embrace change in the IT world. Linux, for many, is ushering in a new age of reason. But why the sudden move this direction? Is it a trendy move or a paradigm shift?

KDE 4 is not user ready

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: It is often said that many open-source-software is not enterprise-ready. But in order to be enterprise-ready, software must first be user-ready. I want to give you a feeling what I mean.

Why Does Everyone Heart Boxee?

Filed under
Software

gigaom.com: The buzz has been building for Boxee lately. Mainstream news outlets like The New York Times, BusinessWeek and NPR are getting hip to the little open-source media center that could quite possibly change the way you experience TV.

Linux Around the World

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: One of the coolest things about the Internet for me personally is that it lets you travel the world, yet can always bring you home in an instant. This may sound corny, but it never fails to amaze me, especially when I am far from home, as I am now.

Tiny Silent Linux PC Gets Updated

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

automatedhome.co.uk: In 2007 we ran a story on the tiny linux PC The Linutop. Now the diminutive system has hit version 2.4 and with it an official launch in the UK. The pint-sized, open source Linux PC is designed to run silently and is highly energy efficient at just 8 watts.

Damn Small indeed

Filed under
Linux

tangledbits.blogspot: Over the last several weeks I have been cleaning out my computer room. While digging through paperwork I found a pen that someone had given to me. The pen contained a 64MB USB drive. I set the pen off to the side. "Great," I thought, "now I can try to put Linux on there."

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today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.