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Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.4.0 released... Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 1:21pm
Story Keys to turn your open source project into a business Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 1:03pm
Story UbuTricks 14.10.08 Released Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:49pm
Story OpenStack Juno Races to Completion as RC2s are Released Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:43pm
Story GNOME on Wayland in Fedora 21 Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:43pm
Story Is This How Mozilla Could Change the World? Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:34pm
Story openSUSE 13.2 RC1 is now out, hands on Rianne Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:29pm
Story What's CoreOS? An existential threat to Linux vendors Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:19pm
Story Linux Foundation Expands International Membership Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:09pm
Story Advice for front-end developers from Adrian Pomilio of Teradata Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:03pm

Yakuake - Great Quake-Like Terminal Application for KDE4

Filed under
Reviews

A while ago I wrote an article called 13 Terminal Emulators for Linux, where I briefly reviewed all those popular shell-like applications and a few flavours of xterm or rxvt. In this article I will talk about Yakuake, a powerful terminal application for Linux, and also the KDE counterpart of Tilda in GNOME.

Eschalon Review - Commercial Role-Playing Game for Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Eschalon is a turn-based RPG (role-playing game), which tries to reproduce the feeling of classic RPG games. It's closed-source, available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, and it comes with a demo too. The full version is available as a download for $19.95.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Humorous Linux Posters - Part One

  • MS makes everybody happy
  • KOffice 2 Receives its First Update
  • FreeTumble 1.0 released
  • Music Slight of Hand
  • The pros and "conns" of Intel's ConnMan for Linux
  • New gentoo stuff, good stuff
  • Why is Ubuntu’s KDE 4 so bait – No really why?
  • My MacBook Pro (V5,3) And Gentoo Prefix
  • OLPC testing saturday && sugar on ubuntu
  • Mac4lin - Give that Mac OS X look to Linux
  • Why Oracle will continue to win
  • Five straightforward steps to vanquish Mono
  • Informercial Pitchman Billy Mays Dies at 50

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to listen to your music on hold, Asterisk

  • How to run KDE on Windows
  • Songbird addon for Ubuntu notification system
  • How to Completely Remove Mono on Ubuntu
  • Error Reporting in PHP
  • The Terminal: I/O Redirection
  • Fixing OpenDocument MIME magic on Linux
  • HOWTO : NTop on Ubuntu 9.04 Server
  • How to extract images from a word document using OpenOffice
  • Gentoo Openbox3 Configuration HOWTO
  • Mercurial, Apache, and OpenSuse 11.1

Is There a Perfect Linux Filesystem?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: Most often, when someone talks about a filesystem or file system, they're referring to disk filesystems such as NTFS, FAT, ext2, ext3, ext4, ISO 9660 and many others but can also refer to network file systems such as CIFS and NFS. But, is there a perfect filesystem?

GNOME 3.0 may have more Mono apps

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: The next major version of the GNOME desktop environment, version 3.0, may contain more than the one Mono-dependent application than it currently does, according to GNOME Foundation member Dave Neary.

10 Signs You Are Ready For Linux

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: The title of this post is a search which came into my site, verbatim. It's a good way of looking at things for a change. So much ink is devoted to "Linux is ready for the desktop", that we tend to forget to view things from the other angle - what kind of user is right for Linux?

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #148

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #148 for the week June 21st - June 27th, 2009 is available.

nullmailer: simple send-only mail transport agent

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Nullmailer is a minimal MTA (Mail Transport Agent) that provides mail delivery services to programs (cron jobs, system integrity checkers, log inspectors, etc.) in a host that otherwise does not require a full MTA like Exim or Postfix.

2 Minutes for Ubuntu Eye Candy

Filed under
Software
HowTos

buntfu.com: When taking a look at "CompizConfig Settings Manager" in Ubuntu it can be a little overwhelming when considering all the possible combinations available to us.

The Terminal: chown, chgrp, and chmod

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HowTos

thatlinuxguy.wordpress: Multiple people can be be doing several things each, all while logged into a single machine. With the rise of multi-user systems came a growing need for security and privacy.

Blogging with Blogger from your desktop with BloGTK

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Software

ghacks.net: BloGTK is an application that allows you to easily blog from the comfort of your own desktop. With BloGTK you can blog off line, save drafts, have multiple accounts, and more.

Full Circle Magazine Issue 26 has arrived

Filed under
Ubuntu

Issue 26 has arrived of Full Circle Magazine has been released. This month Command and Conquer – MOC & IRSSI, My Story – Why I Converted To Linux, and Top 5 – Linux-powered Devices.

Best Linux Notetaking Application

Filed under
Software

sharms.org/blog: I know a lot of people out there like to take notes with Linux, and probably didn’t come across this program yet, as it look me a bit googling to find it again. The program is called KeepNote.

First paper cut milestone reached

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.davebsd.com: The first One Hundred Paper Cuts milestone was completed on time! Ten Ubuntu paper cuts and one Kubuntu paper cut were fixed.

Hidden Linux : File mysteries

Filed under
Linux

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Here's a little mystery for you. Imagine you have three files on a Windows machine called

KDE 4 – Third Time’s the Charm?

Filed under
KDE

meandubuntu.wordpress: Having recently upgraded to Jaunty, I thought it might be time to give KDE another try. I have been a little tough on KDE in the past, but I have always maintained it has potential. Time to see if 4.2 can finally deliver!

GNOME makes Linux look bad?

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

ubunite.com: So I recently did a small test to see what my family and friends would think about Ubuntu or any distro that uses GNOME, the results all favor one common thing; the UI SUCKS, as in how it looks.

A brand new look for KDE Community forums

Filed under
KDE
Web

dennogumi.org: Today, a major upgrade of the KDE Community Forums took place. The change brings quite a number of changes to the forums themselves, and it’s a further step towards providing a better experience for KDE users.

How to Enable Surround Sound in Ubuntu (for PulseAudio)

Filed under
Ubuntu

By default, PulseAudio in Ubuntu up to Jaunty is set to work with 2 speakers (front channels). This tutorial explains how to enable more than 2 audio channels (5.1, 6.1 and so on). Full story

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming