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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A developer’s story about passion for Open Source and Security Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 7:19pm
Story Fedora 20 "Heisenbug" goes beta Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 7:14pm
Story 13-Way AMD GPU Open-Source Linux Driver Comparison On The Source Engine Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 7:12pm
Story Pear OS 8: Linux-based software for tablets, desktops (inspired by iOS) Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 6:24pm
Story You Can Trick Steam for Linux to Think It's Running in SteamOS Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 6:15pm
Story Android Pushes Past 80% Market Share Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 6:11pm
Story Download The Android 4.4 KitKat Quick Start Guide for Free Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 5:33pm
Story Quake Live won't support Linux Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 5:29pm
Story Building Ubuntu for the Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 4:46pm
Story Today's Howtos and Software Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 11:21am

Sun dropping out of OOo wouldn't be bad

Filed under
Interviews
OOo
SUSE

derstandard.at: Novell-developer Michael Meeks finds strong words for Sun's management of the free office suite in an interview - Pushes for own OOo flavor and talks about KDE/GNOME-unification

World's cheapest laptop' now available

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxworld.com (IDG): A company is now selling what it calls the "world's cheapest laptop," which at $130, is not a bad deal if you can bear some hardware limitations.

A Non-insider's Guide to Free and Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

sharplinux.blogspot: For years I have been using and, in some cases, promoting "open source" software, but until a few months ago, I really couldn't have told you what is really behind that idea. I knew vaguely, but since neither I nor anyone I know actually would delve into the source code (at least not at this point), what does it matter?

Microsoft Joins the ASF: Can They Be Trusted?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

ostatic.com: Microsoft announced on Friday that it would be joining the Apache Software Foundation, which costs $100,000/year and is the highest level of sponsorship that the foundation offers. Bruce Perens, a well-known open-source advocate, cautioned on Slashdot that "there's much reason for caution."

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 263

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Guest Review: NimbleX 2008

  • News: Mandriva's 10th Birthday, Fedora 9 Re-Spins, openSUSE PromoDVD, and Foxconn Crippled BIOS
  • Released last week: NimbleX 2008, Foresight 2.0.4, and DragonFly BSD 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Musix 2008-7, sidux 2008-03, and Draco 0.3.2
  • Mini Review: Parted Magic 3.0
  • Reviewed last week: NimbleX 2008, Vector 5.9 SOHO
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly...

Novell's OpenSUSE Version 11 is definitely stacked--maybe too much

Filed under
SUSE

crn.com: Ubuntu 8.04 and Fedora 9 have made great strides in making desktop Linux more user-friendly and technologically advanced. With OpenSUSE 11, Novell Inc. can match them feature for feature.

Traveling Success with Linux

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I have spent the past four days on a short vacation in the Piedmont area of northwest Italy. This has given me the opportunity to make a "traveling test" of Linux on both of my laptops. During this trip I have tried Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Mandriva.

today's leftovers (part deux)

Filed under
News
  • Cloud Computing Could Invite Data Lock-In

  • Run Linux? Save the World, Please.
  • disabling the annoying system beep in linux
  • Make Your Ubuntu Desktop Rotate As a Cylinder/Sphere
  • Sun releases web stack

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 28 July 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org/news: Welcome to the July issue of the Gentoo monthly newsletter! Since our last issue, Gentoo Linux 2008.0 has been released and the Gentoo Security Team held a meeting on July 14, 2008. In howtos: this guide will show you a method for trying to recover just about any deleted file.

openSUSE at OSCON

Filed under
SUSE

zonker.opensuse.org: I can’t believe OSCON is over already. It seems like the week flew by, probably because there was almost zero downtime from the time I arrived in Portland until the time I went to the airport.

Foxconn, ACPI fail, and leaving money on the table

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Matthew Garrett writes, "Linux hasn't claimed to be Linux in response to OSI queries since 2.6.24." With the current kernel.org Linux pretending to be Windows 2000, XP, Server 2003, or Vista, as a motherboard vendor you could just "not support Linux." What a mess. Why support Linux at all?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Running Quicken Premier 2008 on Linux with Wine

  • How to configure DSL in Fedora Linux
  • Eye Candy in Ubuntu 8.04 - Hardy Heron
  • Our LTSP hackfest effort: KIWI-LTSP 0.4.3 with Live USB and CD support
  • mkinitrd for XFS
  • Google Earth on Gentoo (inspite of Digest error)
  • Open Web Foundation to Play Freedom Cop for Net Specs
  • Videos: Dolphin, Gwenview & More in KDE 4.1
  • Ubuntu on Atom: coming soon to a subnotebook near you

OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS

blog-linux.com: Until now I worked exclusively with Linux, I had no experience with other UNIX operating systems. At the weekend I had a bit of time and I decided to make a little experiment - install Open Solaris on my desktop computer.

How to: Installing and running Ubuntu on the Eee PC

Filed under
HowTos

arstechnica.com: When the Asus Eee PC came out last year, we found that the eeextremely eeenticing subnotebook had the potential to be a real game-changer. Indeed, the diminutive wonder has spawned countless imitation products from a wide range of other vendors.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix on the Asus EEE PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

greenhughes.com: I finally took the plunge the other day and decided to wipe the operating system that came with my EEE PC and install Ubuntu Netbook Remix, and I'm very glad I did! I've been using it for a few days now and am really pleased with it.

Linus Torvalds on Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

oreilly.com: 10 days ago Linux creator Linus Torvalds gave an interview in which he talked about what he likes and doesn't like in a Linux distribution:

An Introduction to the Linux Command Line

Filed under
Linux

makeuseof.com: A command line is a method of interacting with your computer that involves typing commands (that is, words and phrases that have meaning to the computer) to make it do things. Command line interfaces replaced punch card systems back in the 1950’s and subsequently made room for GUIs.

X3 Game For Linux Still In Development

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix: Since January of 2007, Linux Game Publishing (LGP) has been working on porting X3: Reunion over to Linux. This game is the sequel to X2: The Threat, which was ported by this Linux game company already. X3: Reunion was scheduled to be released a year ago on the 1st of August.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #101

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 101 for the weeks July 20th - July 26th, 2008 is now available. In this issue: Intrepid Alpha 3 released, Ubuntu Screencasts, and Ubuntu Stats, and much, much more!

Fedora NA - Regional Ambassadors

Filed under
Linux

fedoratutorials.com: One of the things I’ve been working pretty heavily on the past couple weeks is getting more involved in the Fedora Ambassador program. And let’s just say its been a blast. I love the new direction of the North American Ambassador program and am excited to be a part of the newly rejuvenated program.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box