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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Delhi government to switch to free software Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2014 - 2:44am
Story Spark.io Hackers Make An Open-Source Nest Thermostat Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 10:36pm
Story Debian May Be Leaning Towards Systemd Over Upstart Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 10:17pm
Story Raspberry Pi hands-on: PiHub and Bluetooth Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 10:09pm
Story Google's Nest Acquisition Shines a Light on Linux Home Automation Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 8:40pm
Story Mentor’s IVI stack updated with GENIVI 5.0 compliance Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 8:04pm
Story 3.5-inch i.MX6 board runs Linux at a cool 2.3 Watts Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 7:41pm
Story GNOME Shell 3.10 Lands In Ubuntu 14.04 Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 7:31pm
Story First Tizen OS smartphone canceled in Japan Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 7:20pm
Story China reveals own mobile operating system Rianne Schestowitz 17/01/2014 - 7:08pm

C vs Python: Speed

Filed under
Software

theunixgeek.blogspot: Python is a very popular interpreted scripting language. C is a very popular compiled language. Due to its compiled nature, C is generally faster than Python, but is lower-level, making Python programming quicker and easier than C programming.

The Next Paradigm Shift: Open Source Everything

brighthand.com: In the past year, open source software and development models have come to the forefront of mobile computing. The shift isn't just a move to mobile devices, but a move to a different way of doing business with computing. And this one is more profound than just simply cloud computing or moof-ing.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Gentoo: Spellchecking in GTK Applications

  • Virus scanning with F-Secure Rescue CD 3.00
  • How To Change File Type Associations
  • Extract tarballs in Ubuntu
  • Getting wireless to work in Ubuntu on a Lenovo ThinkPad X200
  • #ubuntu Q and A Vol.1 - Hardware
  • 10G database on Ubuntu 8.04
  • How to setup Boot Password (Grub)
  • Unix 101: Manipulating files - Copying, moving, deleting
  • wl wireless driver in Intrepid
  • nvidia geforce fx5500 on Ubuntu 8.04.1

5 reasons to upgrade from Windows Vista to Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Windows Vista has been out for almost two years now but it still suffers from stability and compatibility issues, let alone an insatiable desire for beefier hardware. You don't have to live with it; here are five reasons why Linux makes a better choice for your computer.

opensuse-tutorials is up online

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: There are fedora-tutorials, ubuntu-futorials website on the web, for anyone who envies, of course, we have opensuse-tutorials either.

Best GNU/Linux Desktops Of 2008

Filed under
Linux

cyber-geeks.net: Here i have got some awesome desktop views of various linux editions. So i thought it would be a better idea to publish all these under the title "Best GNU/linux desktops of 2008."

OpenSUSE Linux 11.0, MacOS X Leopard, and Windows Vista

Filed under
OS

suseblog.com: I thought I’d take on the challenge of doing a triple-boot setup on my laptop. Windows Vista, MacOS X Leopard, and OpenSUSE 11.0 all on the same non-Mac machine. A machine much like my Dell Inspiron E1705.

Interview: JOLIE and Service-Oriented Computing Explained

Filed under
Interviews

dot.kde.org: During Akademy 2008, we sat down with Fabrizio Montesi who's working on JOLIE integration in KDE (and Plasma in particular). He explained the mechanics of the technology and what it can do for KDE.

odds & ends

Filed under
Linux
  • mrxvt: Fast, light multitabbed terminal emulator

  • Dangerous Linux Feature?
  • The Amazing Artwork of Fedora 10
  • Lightweight GNU/Linux web browsers
  • Linux Foundation to host End User Collaboration Summit
  • How to install and Configure Hamachi in Ubuntu

How to Perfectly Kill a Perfect Distribution

Filed under
PCLOS

lazytechguy.com: PCLinuxOS was the perfect distribution in 2007. It had all the bells and whistles to be an excellent Windows XP alternative. However, this is 2008 and almost end of 2008. A lot has changed since then.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 37

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #37 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: Hack Week III Judging, Novell OpenPR Blog: Zonker Blogs, and Board election.

Reject Closed Source Mathematical and Scientific Programs

Filed under
OSS

kdubois.net: The modern scientific and mathematical community relies heavily on mathematical software for research and computations of pretty much everything. Unfortunately, from what I’ve seen, most of these tools seem to be closed source.

New startups explore new niches for open source

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Over the weekend two new open-source startups caught my eye (and my inbox): OrecX and Transverse. The first is notable for its demonstration that open source is ready for niche applications. The second? Well, the second is notable because after reading through its website I still have no idea what it does.

Playing Windows Games on Linux: What are your options

Filed under
Gaming

blogs.howtogeek.com: If you're a gamer or a recent linux switcher you probably think you can't play Windows games on your linux box - or that they will run very slow and crash because they are emulating the Windows DirectX API. That's not the case anymore.

Mombuntu - Ubuntu For Your Mom

Filed under
Ubuntu

helpforlinux.blogspot: You might be wondering why I am suggesting an Linux distro for your mom. Well Linux is no longer the stronghold of geeks. Distros like Ubuntu have made using Linux as simple as using Windows.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Resetting the root password on Ubuntu Linux

  • Firefox 3: Getting rid of the drop-downs
  • /etc/grub.conf explained
  • Photo KDE Tutorial 1-4: Brightness/Contrast/Gamma + Hue/Saturation/Lightness
  • Puppet - Centralised configuration management for networks
  • HOW TO: Remove the annoying KDE error when unmounting usb device
  • Ksensors: An Application To Monitor Your Computer’s Temperature

Dell Mini 9....

Filed under
Just talk

So, September the 4th saw the launch of the new Dell Mini 9 PC, which I placed and order on Dells website, paid my money, and even had a dell official call me at work, to check m Work address was where i wanted the device delivered to.. All very good service, and its at this point, over here in the UK, I see problems occuing.

10 Fine-looking Icon Sets for KDE Desktop

Filed under
KDE

junauza.com: Since plenty of you love our collection of icon sets for Ubuntu/GNOME Desktop, I'll be sharing to you all yet another set of my favorite desktop icons. This time, I'll try to cheer up some KDE.

2000 Caldera-Microsoft Settlement Surfaces in Novell v. Microsoft Antitrust Lawsuit

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: The Novell/Canopy/Caldera/DR DOS story continues, and Novell and Microsoft are in the middle of it all, battling in discovery in the Novell v. Microsoft antitrust litigation -- that is the litigation over WordPerfect currently before the US District Court in Maryland in pretrial discovery.

openSUSE Board Election Comments

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The first openSUSE board has been appointed a year ago and now the elections are starting. We have formed an election committee that is organising it.

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More in Tux Machines

New Releases

  • Security-Oriented Qubes OS 3.2 Improves the Integrated Management Infrastructure
    Today, September 29, 2016, Joanna Rutkowska announced the general availability of the second point release of the Qubes OS 3 stable series of the security-oriented and open-source Linux-based computer operating system. Qubes OS 3.2 is a maintenance release, which means that it mostly adds general fixes and improvements to various of the distribution's core components and functionalities, including the integrated management infrastructure that was introduced as part of the previous update, Qubes 3.1, allowing users to also manage the "insides" of a virtual machine.
  • Alpine Linux 3.4.4 Is Out, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.22 LTS, OpenSSL Patches
    Today, September 28, 2016, Alpine Linux creator and lead developer Natanael Cop has the pleasure of announcing the release of the fourth maintenance update to the latest stable Alpine Linux 3.4 server-oriented operating system series. Alpine Linux 3.4.4 is out as the most advanced version, powered by the recently released, long-term supported Linux 4.4.22 kernel and bringing up-to-date components to make your Alpine Linux-based server(s) more stable and reliable than ever. Most of the core components have been updated, but the most important one is OpenSSL 1.0.2j, which received the latest security fixes, just like in the rest of the GNU/Linux distros.

Leftovers: Software

  • Web Publishing and Development: Free Tools Abound
    Are you involved in DevOps and web development, or are you aiming to be? If so, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find our latest roundup of free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6.1 Released
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 Adds a Dark Theme, Notification Muting
  • GNOME Calendar Pencils In Great New Features
    GNOME Calendar is one of the few decent desktop calendaring apps available on Linux — and it's going to get better.
  • The future of GNOME Calendar
    Today, the Calendar Team had the first meeting in history. Isaque, Lapo, Renata, Vamsi and I attended it, and the meeting was extremely productive! In fact, we were able to sketch out the general direction that GNOME Calendar will head towards.

More Android Leftovers

  • ​Google beats back Oracle again in Java Android case
    To recap, Oracle claimed the 37 Java application programming interface (API) packages Google used to develop Android are covered by copyright. Of course, that's not really the issue. True, the the US Federal Circuit Court of Appeals foolishly ruled that APIs could be copyrighted. But the US District Court for the Northern District of California ruled in May 2016 that Google's use of the Java APIs were not subject to copyright licensing fees. Instead, Android's use of the APIs was covered by "fair use."
  • Google’s Open Source Fuchsia OS: The Mystery Linux Distro
    Few things are more tantalizing than a good mystery, and Google is making waves for an open source-centric mystery that may end up having profound implications. It all started in August when an extensive and unusual code repository for a new operating system called Fuchsia was discovered online, and now the growing source code set is on GitHub. Thus far, Google officials have been mostly mum on the aim of this operating system, although they have made a few things clear in chat forums. Two developers listed on Fuchsia's GitHub page — Christopher Anderson and Brian Swetland — are known for their work with embedded systems. The Verge, among other sites, has made a few logical deductions about the possible embedded systems focus for Fuchsia: “Looking into Fuchsia's code points gives us a few clues. For example, the OS is built on Magenta, a “medium-sized microkernel” that is itself based on a project called LittleKernel, which is designed to be used in embedded systems,” the site reports. The GitHub postings that confirm that Fuchsia is based on Magenta are particularly notable because Magenta has had applications in the embedded systems space. Here are some direct quotes: "Magenta is a new kernel that powers the Fuchsia OS. Magenta is composed of a microkernel as well as a small set of userspace services, drivers, and libraries necessary for the system to boot, talk to hardware, load userspace processes and run them, etc. Fuchsia builds a much larger OS on top of this foundation."
  • As Blackberry pulls out of handset business it has some big patent strategy calls to make

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Budgie-Remix Makes Progress With Ubuntu 16.10 Base, Beta 2 Released
    Budgie-Remix, the unofficial Ubuntu spin making use of the Budgie Desktop, has released its 16.10 Beta 2 milestone following this week's Yakkety Yak Beta 2 release. Budgie-Remix is re-based to the latest Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety package changes. In addition, a number of the Budgie-0Remix packages have been working their way into Debian proper and thus are available to Ubuntu 16.10 users via the official channels. Now available this way is the budgie-desktop package, Moka icon theme, Faba icon theme, and the Arc theme. The Ubuntu repository has also pulled in the Budgie artwork and wallpaper packages too.
  • Yakkety Yak Final Beta Released
  • Canonical Launches Commercial Support for Kubernetes
    Canonical, the lead commercial vendor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, is getting into the Kubernetes market. Canonical now offers a freely available implementation of Kubernetes as well as commercial-support options. "I have no doubt that Kubernetes will be one of the major container co-ordination systems," Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, told ServerWatch.
  • [How To] Build an Ubuntu Controlled Sous-Vide Cooker
    I’ll be honest with you from the off: I had zero idea what sous-vide cooking was before I started writing this post. Wikipedia dutifully informs me that’s Sous-Vide is a style of cooking that involves a vacuum, bags, and steam.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro Linux Mini PC Launches For $395
    This week a new version of the popular Mintbox Mini Linux PC has been launched for $395 in the form of the Mintbox Mini Pro which is now equipped with 120 GB of SSD mSATA together with 64-bit AMD A10-Micro6700T system-on-a-chip with Radeon R6 graphics and features 8GB of DDR3L. The latest Mintbox Mini Pro is shipped preloaded with the awesome Linux Mint 18 operating system and includes a microSD card slot a serial port, and a micro SIM card reader. The new Mintbox Mini Pro is the same size as the original and measures 4.3 x 3.3 x 0.9 inches in size and weighs in at around 255g. The Linux mini PC incorporates a fanless design and features an all-metal case made of aluminium and zinc.