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Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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4 Ways To Make Linux Compatible With Even More Software

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Perhaps the best part of using Linux is the massive amount of free software you have access to. Yet for some this isn’t enough. Happily, it’s not all you have access to.

Novell revenues drop as board seeks sale

Filed under
SUSE
  • Novell revenues drop as board seeks sale
  • OpenSUSE 11.2 Review – GNOME Desktop Environment
  • openSUSE 11.3 Almost Without 3G Support
  • Installing software in OpenSuSE with YaST

Ubuntu 10.04 brings Linux closer to the mainstream

Filed under
Ubuntu

washingtonpost.com: No Windows viruses. Free. Any questions? Of course. Start with this one: How can an operating system with those virtues, the open-source Linux, remain confined to a tiny minority of desktop and laptop computers at home?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Radeon "R600g" Gallium3D Driver Merged To Master
  • Running Gentoo Linux on HP Pavilion dm1-1110ev – Result: Success
  • Key WebOS developer jumps ship to Team Android
  • The quiet Ubuntu Netbook revolution
  • Apple files for WebKit browser trademark
  • Five Reasons Willow Garage is Going to Succeed
  • TuxRadar Podcast s2e9: Google Gaggle
  • The Linux Link Tech Show #355 May 26
  • View3ds, viewer for 3D Studio files and V4L Loopback Device
  • Open source pays off for TimeTrex
  • Does Linux Do Enough for Programmers?
  • One Laptop Per Child Revamps Tablet Plans
  • Sabayon 5.3 Progress, Get Involved with Testing, Bumps
  • PCLinuxOS

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Remove Repositories In Ubuntu
  • Hassle-free Backup with Déjà Dup
  • Detailed tutorial about AppArmor for ubuntu users
  • Manual disk partitioning guide for Linux Mint 9 and Ubuntu 10.04
  • Making Movies in Linux with Kdenlive, part 2
  • A Collection of Silly Little Perl Snippets
  • generate and update ODF spreadsheets without OpenOffice
  • The command line PostScript swiss knife: a2ps
  • How to Install Sun Java on Ubuntu 10.04
  • How to mount samba share on Linux client
  • Install Compiz Fusion and Emerald in Fedora 13
  • Dependency-based & Event-based init daemons and launchd
  • The top 10 tricks of Perl one-liners

What is "open source"?

Filed under
OSS
  • What is "open source"? (And why should you care?)
  • What Should be Expected of FLOSS Contributors?
  • Welcome to the world of open source software
  • Why Open Source Makes Sense: Scientifically Proven
  • Google demands more openness from the Open Source Initiative
  • A Thriving FOSS Community on the North
  • An Open Source Principle: One Good Thing Leads To Another

KDE 4.5 beta brings window tiling, new notifications

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: The developers behind the KDE desktop environment have released the first beta of version 4.5. Although the major focus during this development cycle is stability, the release also brings some nice new features and user interface improvements.

Mozilla trying to build VP8 into HTML5 video

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla trying to build VP8 into HTML5 video
  • VLC 1.1.0 Release Candidate supports WebM / VP8
  • WebM - The New Open Source Codec on the Block

Impressions of the latest MeeGo release

Filed under
Linux

blog.nixternal.com: So, I have been spending some time playing around with various netbook operating systems lately, trying to find that perfect one. I have a Dell Mini 10v netbook without bluetooth and with the stock battery. Now on to MeeGo!

Launchy vs. GNOME Do vs. Kupfer

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Today we’ll compare three of the better known launchers for Linux – Launchy, GNOME Do, and Kupfer. While they all have roughly the same function, each has a different take on how it should be done, and the configuration capabilities vary greatly from one to the next. Here, you’ll see what makes each one unique.

Application Menu (Global Menu) For Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 Is Available For Testing

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Global Menu for Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.10 has just been uploaded to a PPA. The new "global menu" is called "Application Menu" and it can be installed in Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx already (both in GNOME and KDE). Here's how.

[Rest here]

MeeGo Netbook Performance: It's Beating Ubuntu & Co

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The last time we ran a performance comparison of different Linux distributions on netbooks was in late November, but now we have a new set of Linux distributions out there, so we have carried out a new comparison. In particular, we are looking closely at how the MeeGo distribution --

Just released Qimo 2.0

Filed under
Linux

qimo4kids.com: It has been a little over a year since I put Qimo 1.0 together using little more than a Wiki page and long sessions of trial and error. Now, using a few more resources and a little better planning, I’ve been able to release version 2.0.

YaST: Yet Another Setup Tool

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Continuing with our look into OpenSuSE, we examine YaST. One of the best things going for OpenSuSE (and SuSE as well) is their take on the tried and true “control panal” YaST. YaST is, quite literally, a one-stop-shop for configuring Linux.

Crebs: The ULTIMATE Wallpaper Slideshow application

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: A few days ago we blogged about a simple wallpaper slideshow generator called, somewhat un-surprisingly, ‘wallpaper slideshow’. Well… forget that.

Measuring the popularity of distros – Part 2 Google Trends

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxblog.net: Yesterday I did a post about using the Distrowatch rankings to measure the popularity of various distros. Today I’m going to use another tool, Google Trends.

Mandriva 2010 Spring background contest winners

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: Here are the results of the contest Mandriva launched one month ago. Thanks everybody for your interest and for contributing, we had almost 150 photos submitted.

Fedora 13: Boring yet Good

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: It’s hard to believe that Fedora is already at it’s thirteenth version. As usual, I decided to test Fedora 13 on my Dell Latitude D630 laptop, which gets by with its 2ghz processor, and its decent 4GB of RAM and integrated Intel graphics.

The developer obsession with code names, 114 interesting examples

Filed under
OS
Linux
Software

royal.pingdom.com: Code names have been around for a long time. Remember the Manhattan project in the 1940s? That turned out to be the atomic bomb. Thankfully, not all code names hide such sinister projects. So what kind of code names are developers out there coming up with?

World's Funniest Windows Error Messages

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

junauza.com: We all know how it sucks to see error messages. If you have been using Windows all your life, you have probably seen lots of them already.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal
    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.
  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux
    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.
  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms
    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on. Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.
  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively
    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’. The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS. The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes
    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes. If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!
  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland
    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor. Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.
  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD
    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release. In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis
    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.
  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora
    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May. The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem. Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.