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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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GNU/Linux: rubbery figures don't help the cause

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Over the last 10 days there has been a spate of reports all based on some surprising statistics titled "Operating System Market Share" put out by a company named Net Applications.

The Sad Truth: Ubuntu Not As Fast As They Say…

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcauldron.com: I am writing this not to simply disagree with Ubuntu in a general sense, but to back it up with experience. I have long since loved Ubuntu for its “just works” philosophy. However, after using Linux for many years, I have seen Ubuntu start to annoy me in key areas.

A visit with Arch

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Originally I installed Arch over the Crux installation on my Thinkpad because I needed some sort of outside reference as to why I kept seeing noise floor calibration errors with my ath_5k-driven wireless card.

Kuki 3.0 Pre Release 1.7 for the AA1

Filed under
Linux

linuxd.wordpress: I’ve been trying a lot of distros on the aa1 recently, I’ve tried all Ubuntus from 8.04 till 9.04, sidux, slitaz, madbox, and now Kuki Linux.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Tuxradar: Podcast Season 1 Episode 8

  • Linux Outlaws 91 - Outlaws Don't Accept the CoC
  • KDE 4.3 Beta 1 Signals Beginning of Bug Hunting Season
  • Power Saving Software for Linux
  • The Choice of Programming Language for Linux isn’t an Easy One
  • Extracating ourselves from the UbuntuOneUbunet mess
  • OpenOffice.org wiki overwhelmed in UI search
  • MySQL Forks
  • Intel buys Open Source firm
  • Sabayon - Rolling On
  • Sabayon 2009 Roadmap
  • Stormy's Corner: Interview w/ Zonker & Vincent Untz
  • Hilarious Linux Mastercard Spoof T-Shirt
  • With Folk Like This GNU/Linux Needs No Enemies
  • NVIDIA Releases 180.60 Linux Display Driver
  • NVIDIA Readies Its OpenCL Linux Driver
  • Switch to the Command line, Part 1
  • An OpenSource business for OpenSource funding
  • Aargh! Walk the plank ye scurvy dogs!
  • M$ not playing fair to OpenOffice
  • France forgets freedom
  • Media-ready SoHo NAS devices run Linux
  • Great Ubuntu and Linux blogs for beginners
  • Security Update for SquirrelMail
  • This Server Goes to 11 Contest

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting Familiar with Linux Logs

  • Making ‘ondemand’ CPU frequency scaling more responsive
  • Oz: Translating Python into Oz
  • Using SugarSync under Linux
  • Install the Firefox 3.5 Beta in Linux
  • Gentoo + X11 + No Mouse/Keyboard
  • Installing the Open Sound System (OSS) in Fedora
  • Command Line Basics: echo
  • A Newbie’s Getting Started Guide to Linux [PDF]
  • Install a Minimal Ubuntu Desktop
  • ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host
  • MBR (Master Boot Record) Backup & Restore

Could Adobe be open-sourcing Flash?

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: Over the years, Adobe has become more Linux friendly. First, Adobe released an excellent version of its Flash Player for Linux, and, more recently, the company launched a version of AIR (Adobe Integrated Runtime) for Linux. Now, however, with Strobe, its just announced Flash framework, Adobe looks like it may be getting more open-source friendly as well.

Slackware 12.1

Filed under
Slack

blog.jjtcomputing: Slackware has been a Linux distro I’ve never really been interested in. It is the oldest distro still going and really did show it in my opinion. It was difficult to use, unfriendly and fairly slow.

Linux and Firefox market share - the reality

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

ivan.fomentgroup.org: You may have seen that, according to NetApps Linux is used by 1% (or in words - one percent) of online users. There’s one thing to note,

Game over for Linux netbooks?

Filed under
Hardware
  • Game over for Linux netbooks?

  • Living with a netbook: Toy or tiny notebook?
  • Open Source Netbook Protection: Adeona

Microsoft uses Big Buck Bunny to Demonstrate Silverlight

Filed under
Microsoft

A couple of weeks ago I attended the yearly National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) trade show in Las Vegas. This year the show itself was a little quieter than usual - for example the RED camera circus wasn't in town, drawing hundreds, blocking aisles and making a nuisance of itself - which generally meant it was easier to walk around, talk to people and actually learn a few things.

10 Awesome Linux Applications for Your PlayStation 3

Filed under
Software

maximumpc.com: So you’ve installed that shiny Ubuntu distro onto your PlayStation 3 and finagled a couple of cool applications to boot. And yet, there’s still a lot of empty real estate on that newly formatted hard drive.

About UbuntuOne --

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.ibeentoubuntu.com: I've been waffling for a couple of days over whether to write this post or not. I finally decided to just speak my mind.

Linux certifications: Hot or not?

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: But some in the Linux community say the emergence of certifications is by no means a golden ticket for admins, and perhaps just a waste of time and money.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 71

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #71 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Get Ready for the openSUSE Community Week, Jan-Simon Möller: GSoC Introduction openSUSE @ ARM, and Katarina Machalkova: Secret AutoYaST features.

Open source shrugs at EU liability plans

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Open source writers who are also market players, like our Matt Asay and Infoworld’s Savio Rodrigues, are dumping on a European Commission (EC) proposal to make software sellers liable for the problems in their code, just as dishwasher makers are liable for problems.

The Problem With X

Filed under
Software

connectedinternet.co.uk: Xwindows is the GUI that pretty much every free and non-free unix and unix-like OS uses. Xwindows is a paradox, in that in some ways it is advanced, especially considering it’s age.

Brits to test life without Windows

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Two British IT workers are planning to spend a month without Windows, using GNU/Linux instead in a project designed to see whether "the Linux operating system is capable of delivering the function and style of delivery that an established Windows user can adapt to easily."

Ubuntu Fans Move Quickly to Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: When it comes to deploying Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope), Canonical’s installed base seems to be a loyal, eager crowd.

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Games and Emulation

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Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

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  • #1: Easy Package Registration
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  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.