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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Mozilla Developers Will Unveil Some Firefox OS Based Devices At MWC 2014 Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 12:06pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.13.4 Brings ARM64 (AArch64) Improvements Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 10:02am
Story The Reason Some Games Are Delayed For Linux In Humble Indie Bundles Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 9:53am
Story Linux Advocacy - My Take Rianne Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 1:21am
Story Linux Distros Gone Today, Here Tomorrow Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2014 - 9:38pm
Story NeonView 0.8.2 Released Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2014 - 8:37pm
Story The Linux Kernel: Android? Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2014 - 8:36pm
Story Canonical to show off Mir enabled Ubuntu Touch at MWC Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2014 - 8:31pm
Story Best Android Apps For Finding and Sharing New Recipes Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2014 - 4:11pm
Story Google's Project Tango Struts Into the Spotlight Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2014 - 4:02pm

Linux News Sites Web Traffic Slowdown: Is this for real?

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Web As with the U.S. economy, it seems like the web traffic of several well-known Linux related news sites are slowing down. According to statistics from Alexa, famous sites like Slashdot,, and Linux Journal among others have a sudden decrease in site visitors.

Compiz Killed My Video Card

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Software Having recently installed a new version of Linux I thought I'd see how progress on Compiz, the compositing window manager, was going. And this is where it gets interesting.

Introducing Geode

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Moz/FF You’ve arrived in a new city, and are looking for a good place to eat. You pull out your laptop, fire up Firefox, and go to your favorite review site. It automatically serves up some delicious suggestions. But first, your browser needs to know where you are. Introducing Geode.

Become a multimedia pro with the Vector Linux Multimedia Bonus Disc

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Linux Many audio, video, and graphics professionals would like to make the switch to Linux, but don't want to deal with the hassle of figuring out multimedia on Linux or are scared off by the purported lack of such tools. I created Vector Linux Multimedia Bonus Disc (MMBD) to address this problem and perception.

Free software tools for designing productive community sites

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Software These days there’s a lot of buzz about “Web 2.0” and making websites more interactive, but what’s really going on is a reconnection to the community nature of the internet. Here’s a guide to eight technologies you should consider.

10 Handy Productivity Tools in Linux

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Software For productivity, Linux can compete with Windows and Mac as Linux has a great set of productivity applications. While some applications run on all platforms, there are others just available exclusively on Linux. Here is a list of 10.

Five outliners for Linux

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Software The first essays of the school year are coming due, and with the essays comes the need to outline and plan. GNU/Linux users are fortunate to have a number of outlining applications from which to choose.

wubi: Best Thing Since LiveCD

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Software Wubi (Windows-based Ubuntu Installer) is amazing. It’s one of those tools that should make 100s if not 1000s of people to try out Linux right away. But I am not sure if this tool is making as much noise as it should.

Untangle Joins The Linux Foundation

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Linux (PR): Open source network gateway company Untangle increases community involvement with Foundation membership; academic affiliates also join the organization.

LinuxWorld is now OpenSource World

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jeremy.linuxquestions: As a valued member of our LinuxWorld conference speaker community, we wanted you to be among the first to hear of the launch of OpenSource World Conference & Expo, a new event that will focus on open source software and all things Linux.

AMD Walks Away From Manufacturing

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  • AMD spins off plants into venture with Abu Dhabi

  • AMD Splits, Launches The Foundry Company
  • AMD and Advanced Technology Investment Company of Abu Dhabi to Create Leading-Edge Semiconductor Manufacturing Company
  • AMD: Keeping Competition Alive

New Ubuntu 8.10

Gonna be great!
52% (354 votes)
24% (163 votes)
Gonna suck!
7% (48 votes)
Won't test it.
18% (121 votes)
Total votes: 686

Listen to music with open source Banshee

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Software Perhaps one of the most popular media players for Linux currently is Amarok, a KDE-based music player. While Amarok is certainly good, for GNOME users who prefer something that looks more native, Banshee is a great alternative.

Has open source won--or has it lost?

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OSS Assessing the Open Source scorecard is complicated. A complete "state of Open Source" would fill many pages. But here are a few things that have struck me over the past year or two.

Rallying call for late Debian 5.0

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Linux GNU/Linux Debian 5.0, "Lenny" has missed its originally proposed September release because of too many critical bugs. The developers have now issued a rallying call to Debian maintainers and users to encourage them to work on the next major release of Debian, with the aim of getting 5.0 out before the end of 2008.

The free software ecosystem and its denizens

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mdzlog.wordpress: Free software is a remarkable phenomenon. It is a highly evolved form of collaboration: compared to other creative endeavors, free software developers all over the world are able to work together on a project with surprisingly little friction. There are many recognized roles in free software, but they can be broadly classified into three types.

OOXML: Flogging a Dead Horse

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OSS I am continually amazed by the amount of time, energy and expense that the ISO are going to to support the standard that nobody really wants or believes (in except for one corporation and it’s paid lackeys of course). Yes, it’s IS29500 (OOXML to you and me).

Installing Xbox Media Center (XBMC) On Ubuntu 8.04

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The Xbox Media Center (XBMC) is a media center application for Linux, Mac, and Windows that allows you to manage/watch/listen to/view your videos, music, and pictures. It has a nice interface, can be controlled from the desktop or a remote control or via its built-in web interface, and it can be extended by custom scripts.

PC-BSD 7 is a mixed bag

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BSD FreeBSD is a Unix-like open source operating system that can trace its ancestry back to the original Unix. It's well known and well respected in the server marketplace, but until recently FreeBSD lacked an easy-to-use desktop version. In 2005 the PC-BSD project was started to provide just that. This month PC-BSD version 7 was released.

8 Ways to Maintain a Clean, Lean Ubuntu Machine

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Ubuntu Once in a while, you may want to do some maintenance on your Ubuntu machine and clean up unnecessary files that are chunking up large storage space in your hard disk. Here are 8 ways that you can use to clean up your Ubuntu:

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Zorin OS 12 Beta - Flat white, no sugar

I did not do any other testing, no extensive tweaking, no customization. I felt no need or desire to do so. Now, do remember Zorin OS 12 is still in beta, so we can excuse some of the problems we see here. But others are purely Ubuntu, and have been ported over from the parent distro without any discrimination or any improvements and fixes introduced in the last six months. The big offenders include: multimedia and smartphone support, poor software management, and then the somewhat heavy utilization and slow performance. Zorin is quite pretty but weary on the eyes, it tries perhaps too hard to be more than it is, and overall, the value it brings is negatively offset by the myriad papercuts of its design and the implementation of its unique style, plus the failings of the Ubuntu family. It's an okay choice, if you will, but there's nothing too special about it anymore. It's not as fun as it used to be. Gone is the character, gone is the glamor. This aligns well with the overall despair in the Linux desktop world. Maybe the official release will be better, but I doubt it. Why would suddenly one distro excel where 50 others of the same crop had failed with the exact same problems? Final grade, 5/10. Test if you like the looks, other than that, there's no incentive in really using Zorin. Oh how the mighty have fallen. Read more

PlayStation 4 hacked again? Linux shown running on 4.01 firmware

Hackers attending the GeekPwn conference in Shanghai have revealed a new exploit for PlayStation 4 running on the 4.01 firmware. In a live demo you can see below, once again the Webkit browser is utilised in order to inject the exploit, which - after a conspicuous cut in the edit - jumps to a command line prompt, after which Linux is booted. NES emulation hilarity courtesy of Super Mario Bros duly follows. Assuming the hack is authentic - and showcasing it at GeekPwn makes the odds here likely - it's the first time we've seen the PlayStation 4's system software security compromised since previous holes in the older 1.76 firmware came to light, utilised by noted hacker group fail0verflow in the first PS4 Linux demo, shown in January this year. Read more Also: 'Deus Ex: Mankind Divided' Coming To Linux In November, Mac Port On Hold

pcDuino goes quad-core, swaps Arduino for RPi compatibility

LinkSprite’s $25, 64 x 50mm “pcDuino4 Nano” SBC is a re-spin of FriendlyARM’s NanoPi M1, offering a quad-core H3, Raspberry Pi expansion, and 3x USB ports. Can you be a pcDuino without the Duino? For its latest open source pcDuino board, LinkSprite has switched from Arduino compatibility to a 40-pin Raspberry Pi expansion interface, breaking the mold of the three pcDuino SBCs, and five models total, that made it into our June HackerBoard SBC survey. The new pcDuino4 Nano, which is on pre-sale for $25, follows the $40 pcDuino3 Nano, which fell directly in the middle of the pack of our reader rankings of community-backed SBCs, but was the most popular of the pcDuino models overall. Read more