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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Has Linux lost the desktop battle?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Even I have done it. I don't think you can be a Linux blogger without having done at least one post about how this year is the year the Linux desktop will take over the world. However, no matter how many people seem to write about it. The year the Linux desktop takes over the world always seems to fall through the cracks.

Zenwalk 6.4: Simple yet Awesome

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: It’s been a long time since I last took a look at Zenwalk. I’ve always had a sweet spot for it, though I haven’t had a chance to really give it a full spin in quite some time. Although I am primarily a KDE user, there’s something about Zenwalk that always keeps my attention: It’s simple, fast, and gets the job done.

openSUSE 11.3 is here!

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the release of the latest incarnation of openSUSE, with support for 32-bit and 64-bit systems. openSUSE 11.3 is packed with new features and updates.

Using Compiz As A Windows Management Tool

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: You’ve seen the wobbly windows, you’ve seen the cube, you’ve seen the raindrops. Compiz is just a bunch of useless eye candy right? Wrong.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • screen’s competition: tmux
  • Using Camera RAW with Linux
  • Large Text File (logs) viewer - Rowscope
  • Find the Python shell of your dreams in DreamPie
  • Ubuntu Manual Project core philosophy
  • Android 2.2 (FroYo) review
  • How Many Types of Linux Do We Need?
  • Here's The 3dfx Banshee, Voodoo DRM/KMS Driver
  • Pr09studio Introduces Probably The Best Collection of Ubuntu Wallpapers Ever
  • Probably The Best 5 GnoMenu Themes
  • Linux: No bloatware, popups, and annoyances
  • fedora branding fonts
  • DebConf10: the Debian Project
  • FLOSS Weekly 127: Guillermo Amaral

Two Problems with Free

Filed under
OSS
  • Two Problems with Free
  • The Open source legal maze: an open trap?
  • Open Source Cornerstones
  • Portugal: Nearly all school children getting familiar with open source
  • Net Neutrality is a double edged sword
  • Is open source ready for business prime time?
  • Open-source hardware standards formally issued
  • Open Source Hardware (OSHW) Draft Definition version 0.3

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • PDF Manipulations And Conversions From Linux Command Prompt
  • UNIX / Linux Basics: Part VIII
  • Unix How-To: Tricks for Working with Filenames
  • Beautify your GNOME desktop
  • Migrate / Move MySQL Database And Users To New Server
  • Change a MySQL Table from MyISAM to InnoDB
  • Getting to Grips with GRUB 2
  • HOWTO: Cross compiling the kernel for the Mini2440
  • The Ultimate Logrotate Command Tutorial with 10 Examples
  • Running Linux on new OpenRisc simulator or1ksim 0.4.0
  • How to install Nanny on Mint 9 and Ubuntu 10.04

Installing applications in Linux with a double click

ghacks.net: For many, the biggest barrier to adopting Linux is the challenge of having to use the command line for too many tasks. One of these tasks, it is though, is the installation of applications.

Portable Linux Apps - Fun Fav Apps from any Linux w/ USB

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: Ever wanted to run your favourite Linux applications from a USB sticks on ANY major Linux distribution with the need to install anything? Then prepare to say hello to Portable Linux Applications.

Get ready for a whole new forge

Filed under
OSS
Web

sourceforge.net: Today SourceForge is announcing an open beta period for a new set of tools for developers. Specifically, our engineers have begun work on new and better tools for project members who want to use our tracker, wiki, and source code management.

Pidgin's Buddy pounce, a powerful Notification Feature

Filed under
Software

linuxers.org: Consider this scenario - you want to have an imp. discussion with someone on your chat list and the person is marked away. You are wondering if there is any way you could be notified when he returns.

Unigine Is Working On A Strategy Game

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Earlier this month the developers behind the Unigine Engine shared their latest update on this advanced 3D engine that's fully supported under Linux.

Top Solaris developer flees Oracle

theregister.co.uk: Greg Lavender, the lead developer in charge of the Solaris operating system at Oracle, has left the company.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.35 (Part 2) - File systems and storage

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Direct I/O and improved out-of-space handling for Btrfs, optimisations for XFS and OCFS2, major restructuring measures for the Libata driver and extended RAID migration options are among the most important changes in Linux 2.6.35.

Fedora 14 Theme Preview

Filed under
Linux

mairin.wordpress: At last week’s design team meeting, we made a decision about the direction of the overall theme for Fedora 14′s artwork, which will affect – among other things – the default wallpaper.

Happy birthday, Open Source - you're legal now

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: Today is a landmark in open source history, the unofficial birthday of the movement. On this day, in 1992, version 0.1 of 386BSD (you might know it as Jolix) was released.

My Favorite 4 RSS Feed Readers

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: A quick collection of my favorite RSS feed reader applications for Ubuntu desktop. Even though it is totally out of place in my Gnome desktop, Akregator is my favorite among the lot. But after exploring a bit further, I found feed readers like Yarssr really good and easy to use. So here is my list.

Open source celebrity to visit Oz

Filed under
OSS

Spotlight on Linux: Pardus Linux 2009.2

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Pardus Linux is one of those distributions that doesn't get the attention it probably deserves. Pardus makes a wonderful desktop system for those that prefer ease of use. Available as an install image or live CD, it ships with lots of great applications, multimedia support, and browser plugins.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.