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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why I prefer KDE over GNOME

Filed under
KDE

temporaryland.wordpress: In my early days of using Linux (around 2000) I used to always install GNOME as well as KDE. I wanted to be proficient in both and had no bias to either one. But then the GNOME developers decided to force everyone

Opera is THE BEST BROWSER for Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Software

daveshields.wordpress: I have been using Firefox for years, but I noticed the Ubuntu version was a bit sluggish, so I decided to try Opera a couple of days ago. I have found Opera to be much faster than Firefox.

Beginning GIMP: From Novice to Professional

Filed under
Reviews
GIMP

books.slashdot.org: While many professionals would opt for the paid programs, there is a free alternative: GIMP (Gnu Image Manipulation Program). The only stumbling block is learning how to use it properly. That is where Beginning GIMP: From Novice to Professional, Second Edition by Akkana Peck comes in

My Latest Linux Experiment

Filed under
Linux
PCLOS

lockergnome.com/blade: As I mentioned last week, I was going to give Linux another try to see what some of the latest new distributions have to offer.

Open Solaris 2008.11 - A step in the right direction, but

Filed under
OS

dedoimedo.com: My review of Open Solaris 2008.05 was a rant of a dissatisfied Linux user, who found the fresh new Open Solaris desktop edition to be too messy and difficult for daily usage. I decided to try the latest release, Open Solaris 2008.11.

The different between Ubuntu Desktop, Alternate CD and server CD

Filed under
Ubuntu

samiux.wordpress: Newbies of Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Edubuntu will be confused by the name of her official released CDs - Desktop Live CD, Alternate CD and Server CD. Why she makes these different CDs?

The Linux Staging Tree, what it is and is not.

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: The Linux Staging tree (or just "staging" from now on) is used to hold stand-alone drivers and filesystems that are not ready to be merged into the main portion of the Linux kernel tree at this point in time for various technical reasons.

Realistic netbook expectations

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Will half-baked Ubuntu Linux netbooks ruin the OS for consumers?

  • The quiet Ubuntu netbook revolution
  • Realistic netbook expectations
  • Netbooks, Linux and the Lenovo S10
  • No SUSE Linux for ARM netbooks: Novell
  • Linux on netbooks to fall below 10% in 2009
  • Linux losing ground on netbooks

6 Ways Learning Linux Can Help You in 2009

Filed under
Linux

openmode.ca: By taking steps to learn about Linux, and using it at home, you are actually investing your time by making a good investment in solid skills and that you will gain perspectives that will help you for the future.

First Look: OpenGEU 8.10

Filed under
Linux

news.softpedia.com: Another week, another First Look and yet another Enlightenment-using distribution came knocking at our doors. It's OpenGEU this time around and it has reached version 8.10.

50 ways to impress your geeky linux friends

Filed under
Linux

laptoplogic.com: Our own Geek Queen Blair Mathis is back with 50 ways to increase your Linux knowledge and help you along the way to true geekdom.

“Oh, well allow me to retort.”

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: Red Hat VP and Assistant General Counsel, wrote about Red Hat’s patent policy in response to some stories in the “press” spreading FUD about some AMQP-related patents, and (non sequitur alert) the recent virtualization agreement with Microsoft.

What the IBM-Sun talk means for open source

Filed under
OSS
  • What the IBM-Sun talk means for open source

  • An IBM Acquisition May Be Good for Sun, But it's Still Worrisome
  • The rise of the Blue Sun, IBM and Sun
  • IBM and Sun? What's In It For Linux?
  • IBM Looks to Buy Sun: Further Proof It's Darkest Just Before Dawn

The Squirrel portable shell and scripting language

Filed under
Linux

The Squirrel Shell provides an advanced, object-oriented scripting language that works equally well in UNIX, Linux, Mac OS X

Review: PcLinuxOS 2009.1

Filed under
PCLOS

raiden.net: In 2007 as one of our first Linux distro reviews, we took a peak at PcLinuxOS 2007 (aka PCLOS) and found it at the time to be a stellar product for it's time, stable, clean, easy to use and enjoyable. Will 2009 still retain it's former glory, or has the new version ended up as a fizzling dud?

Linux is more than just a Novel Concept

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: Linux is characteristically found to be one of the most unswerving, stable, secure, cost effective and well-organized system.

Easystroke

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: Easystroke is an application for X that allows you to specify mouse gestures to invoke actions.

Kernel Log - What's new in 2.6.29: Part 8

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: A glance at the changed files and code makes it clear how hard the kernel hackers have been working on 2.6.29, with more new lines of code added over the current development cycle than ever before.

Unreleased ATI Catalyst Driver Appears In Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Last year when Ubuntu 8.10 was released it had shipped with an unpublished ATI Catalyst driver since the proprietary ATI drivers available to the public were not compatible with X Server 1.5. Now with Ubuntu 9.04 we have run into a similar situation.

On Configuring The Linux Kernel For Debugging

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: In this blog let’s look at something simple, yet apparently, not used nearly enough. Let’s look at configuring the Linux kernel with various options for debugging.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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