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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 2:01pm
Story Great News for Start of the Week: The H is Back! Roy Schestowitz 5 19/02/2014 - 1:49pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 1:47pm
Story The quest for the perfect Twitter client on Linux Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:55am
Story A Nicely-Built 40-Core Raspberry Pi Cluster Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:38am
Story Classic Desktops, KDE Changes, and Photoshop Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:37am
Story Usability and Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:29am
Story Dear Adobe: Make Software for Linux Too Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:16am
Story Sony Xperia Z2 tablet specs leaked Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:05am
Story Evolve OS - an Upcoming Linux Distribution Featuring a New Desktop Environment Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 12:07am

Distro Review: OpenSUSE 11

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SUSE I left openSUSE 3 years ago, and for good reason, it sucked. It was buggy, bloated, slow, and horribly unfriendly to use. So let's skip ahead 3 years to the present, openSUSE 11.0 is out and I'm ready to forgive past mistakes and give them another shot.

The Purpose of the Fifth Amendment to the Bill of Rights

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Legal I'm thinking that we need a few fun classes on the Bill of Rights to the US Constitution. No. Really. If you'll try to pay attention, I'll try to make it enjoyable.

The need to know: Documentation in Linux

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Linux Documenting the development of open source software is key to keeping it easy to use, but some disagree on its necessity. More often than not, documentation is an afterthought, and is what happens when the interesting bits of a software project are over and done.

What Are My Favorite Linux & OSS Websites?

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Web A couple of weeks ago I made a deal with Susan Linton of Lisa and I will write a two part article on why we're using Linux and why we've chosen the distros we use in return for having Susan write the Linux section of our ezine for one (possibly two) issues.

5 Best Free/Open-source Turn-based Strategy Games for Linux

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Gaming After recommending those excellent real-time strategy (RTS) games for Linux, let's move on to this other type of strategic gaming referred to as turn-based.

Ubuntu Lunacy

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Ubuntu We’re all pretty familiar with the how popular Ubuntu has become since it first started, but believe it or not there are actually still some people out there who choose to instead bash it because their distro flat out sucks. I’m not going to go into any of the names of the distro’s.

Elive The Age Of Enlightenment

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Linux ELIVE is a live Linux CD showcasing the Enlightenment window manager/desktop shell. The Belgian project's slogan, "Where Debian Meets Enlightenment", provides us with an early hint that here is a Linux distribution built on very strong, very deep foundations.

GIMP 2.6.0 Released

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GIMP The GIMP developers are proud to release GIMP 2.6.0 today. GIMP 2.6 is an important release from a development point of view. It features changes to the user interface addressing some often received complaints, and a tentative integration of GEGL, the graph based image processing library that will eventually bring high bit-depth and non-destructive editing to GIMP.

few howtos:

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  • Vim Tips

  • Linux RAR/7z/ZIP Cracking
  • FreeBSD: Load Kernel Module at Runtime
  • Simplify system security with the Uncomplicated Firewall
  • Patch me gently
  • Get things rolling with GUI
  • Ubuntu 8.04 Persistent Install To USB Stick
  • HOWTO : Home made NAS server with Ubuntu 8.04.1 – Part VII
  • Gnome system wide shortcut keys
  • Getting a Hand With Bash
  • managing mysql binary logs
  • Adding a new hard disk to Linux, and why the Linux filesystem trounces Windows' butt

Book Review: Linux in Easy Steps

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Linux I recently went looking for a good beginner’s resource for a budding Linux user, and came across Linux in Easy Steps by Mike McGrath. It’s an excellent primer for the new Linux user. Focused on the Ubuntu Linux distribution, Linux in Easy Steps covers installation, desktop configuration, and basic command line use in a slim volume with plenty of screenshots.

Are Microsoft's open source actions enough?

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OSS The world's biggest software company is best known for its proprietary technologies, but a technology center opened this year may contribute to enterprise interoperability. And yet the skepticism remains

Simply Mepis 8 is Looking Good

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preacherpen.wordpress: Linux is what my computers run on, and Simply Mepis is the particular distribution. I have been using Simply Mepis for a number of years, and have been extremely pleased with it. I have version 7.9.8 beta installed on my laptop, and couldn’t be happier with what I see.

The State of Kernel Mode-Setting

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Linux Earlier this year Fedora 9 was the first distribution providing kernel-based mode-setting (or KMS for short). At the time there was only a kernel mode-setting driver for Intel hardware and it ended up being disabled. With months having passed since our first article and Red Hat engineers working aggressively on KMS improvements for Fedora 10, we are providing another look at this technology and some of the recent advancements.

Is the Cloud Stupid? Count me among those less than intelligent by Stallman’s reckoning individuals that considers cloud computing inevitable. I’ll go further and argue that’s it’s not inevitable, it’s done. Already.

Kernel Log: 2.6.27 nearing completion; Btrfs to be added to the kernel?

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Linux Linus Torvalds hinted that the eighth release candidate (RC) of Linux 2.6.27, would be the last RC prior to release of the next major kernel. Usually, once such a hint is dropped, it takes one to two weeks for the next version to be released.

Review: SimplyMEPIS 8.0 Beta 2

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Linux SimplyMEPIS was, believe it or not, my main distribution back in 2005 and used it with minimal complaints for a number of years. Then I moved away from Mepis and never returned - until now (/dramatic music).

OLPC / Amazon preparing to bring G1G1 to Europe?

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OLPC There were 4 big questions when it was first revealed that Amazon would be running this year's edition of the Give 1 Get 1 program. 3 out of these 4 questions have been answered so what about the last one? Well, for the first time there are some indications that OLPC and Amazon are preparing to bring G1G1 v2 to Canada and Europe.

Rule #1: Hold On Loosely

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In the proprietary production world, what matters about a copyright is who owns it. In the free production world, however, who owns a copyright is relatively unimportant. What matters is what license it is offered under. There is a very simple rule of thumb about the best license to use: use a “free, copyleft license”.

today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu Server: Canonical's Third Way to the Enterprise

  • Office 2007 docx to ODF Conversion
  • Video tour: Bluefish editor
  • Chávez chavs get Linux Classmates
  • Mandriva 2009 RC2 KDE4
  • ClickJacking! Nooooooooo!
  • Setting up your own certificate authority with gnoMint
  • Make Linux: Harder - Better - Faster
  • Ubuntu: Not A Small Business Server Replacement (Yet)
  • Running git-daemon under an unprivileged user
  • libZYpp, torrents and metalinks
  • The Conundrum of Choices and the Linux Learning Curve
  • Go Forward The Message
  • Pandora pre-orders go live
  • about:mozilla - Mobile Firefox, Weave, Data, Logos, FAQs and more…
  • “Linux Ahead” - - a new video podcast show on FOSS news
  • Critical hole in Mplayer
  • Open Source Census Tracks Enterprise Use of Open Source Globally

Open Source Census Finds FOSS Everywhere

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OSS The Open Source Census, which I mentioned back in April, just dropped a press release this morning about the data it's been collecting. I chatted the day before with Kim Weins, senior VP of OpenLogic, a key co-sponsor of the census, and how they found a few ... surprises in the results.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.