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Friday, 06 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Top Five Microsoft U-turns

Filed under
Microsoft

theinquirer.net: Microsoft yesterday surprised many by saying it would open the books on its software, revealing and documenting critical APIs and other information. Five more technology U-turns Microsoft took are listed here:

Also:

  • Why you should care about Microsoft's open-source move

  • Microsoft openness initiative proves they still don't get it
  • World not open to Microsoft promises
  • Korean Professor Wins Patent Lawsuit Against Microsoft
  • What Microsoft is really up to

Zebuntu: Ubuntu 7.10 under disguise!

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Currently, Zebuntu is nothing else but a rebranded, BeOS-themed XFCE variant of Ubuntu 7.10, with a new control panel (MAGIC). Now what?

A Sneak Preview of Picasa 2.7 for Linux

Filed under
Software

techthrob.com: Google's Picasa software is a powerful tool for managing your photo collection. It provides a simple interface for organizing your pictures, as well as some easy-to-use, yet powerful image manipulation tools. However, until recently the Windows version of Picasa has had some features that put it above the Linux version.

DVDs and Documents

Filed under
Microsoft

Jeremy Allison: "How many Microsoft engineers does it take to change a light bulb?
None. They just declare darkness the new standard".

KDE 4.1: Visual Changelog (rev 777000)

Filed under
KDE

polishlinux.org: KDE 4.1 will be what everyone expected 4.0 to be — a fully functional revolutionary Linux desktop. I took a look at the revision 777000 of this desktop environment and what you get is a visual changelog describing the current progress in terms of look and feel and features.

Get rid of stowaway packages with GNU Stow

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: The installation instructions in most free software reviews aren't enough. If you decide a package sucks, how do you get rid of it? If a package rocks, how do you upgrade it? GNU Stow, a package manager for packages you compile and install yourself, provides an easy answer to both questions.

Linux Desktops: Real Relief for Windows Users

Filed under
Linux

reallylinux.com: What an odd thing it is to find so many people still questioning the merits of moving to a Linux Desktop. It’s almost as though those of us who have been extensively using Windows for years now have some sort of problematic memory issue. Perhaps the proper psychology term is something like ST-PiT-MR also known as Short term pain in the tush memory relapse syndrome.

Simple Firefox Tips and Tricks (Some of Which You Might Not Know…)

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: I have used Firefox browser for a long time and I always think that I know all the features inside out. When I was told of the following seemingly simple but useful tricks, I know I was wrong.

Quick and easy photo management with F-Spot

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: Photo management software for Windows makes us weep. For most people, photo management consists of loading the software (and drivers) that came from the camera manufacturer. So you've got a Nikon camera, and the photo management software is really different from your significant other's Kodak software.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OLPC: one bad idea per child

  • Tethered capture with gphoto2
  • How to install Mythbuntu 8.04 Alpha 2
  • Redux: Gentoo's top 3 issues
  • Life before Google
  • Adding System Services with Upstart
  • Func, the Fedora Unified Network Controller
  • KDE PIM Team Meets to Talk Akonadi and KDE 4.1
  • Abyss: a small, sweet Web server
  • Red Hat not impressed with Microsoft's interoperability plans
  • Open source fans offer differing views of MS move
  • Winners and losers in Microsoft open API move
  • Is Microsoft using the "anti-lock-in" argument from OSS's playbook?
  • Novell and the Community
  • Back to Gentoo
  • Miguel de Icaza talks to the INQ
  • Local Caching For Network Filesystems

Logo War: Red Hat Takes On DataPortability

Filed under
Linux

techcrunch.com: Open source giant Red Hat sent a Cease and Desist letter to the DataPortability.org group today demanding the removal of the DP logo from the group's website, saying their logo is "identical to the Fedora Infinity design logo owned by Red Hat."

Samba author: GPLv3 has further to go

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com.au: While he sees the GPLv3 as "extremely good", Andrew "Tridge" Tridgell believes that the free software licence still needs strengthening. In this video interview he said that the anti-DRM provisions didn't go far enough.

The paradox of FOSS projects supporting Windows

Filed under
OSS

bryceharrington.org: As we near in on the Inkscape 0.46 release, I've been increasingly focusing on the few remaining "critical" bugs. A lot of these are specific to the Windows port, which is a bit frustrating for those of us whose big hope in life is to *replace* Windows, not to support it.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Network Tip No.3: Global Configuration Mode

  • Network Tip No. 4: exit Command
  • to HUP or nohup?
  • Automatic tab title in gnome-terminal
  • How to install Nvidia drivers in Ubuntu Feisty or later versions
  • colordiff — a tool to colorize diff output
  • How To: Run Call of Duty 4 (COD4): Modern Combat in Linux
  • Boot Speed Ubuntu
  • Restore the Master Boot Record
  • How to install Grub from a live Ubuntu cd
  • Boot CD for Ubuntu usb flash

Ktorrent 3.0 - hello, KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

liquidat.wordpress: With Ktorrent one of the largest external KDE projects now released a first stable KDE 4 version of their product. This also shows that KDE 4 is also accepted by external developers.

It’s time to face it: Linux is not coming to the desktop. Ever.

Filed under
Ubuntu

theubuntuexperiment.wordpress: While it was great fun trying to convert my mother to Ubuntu, this experiment ended up in a complete failure. Linux is not ready for the desktop, and never will be, too.

Why I use Fedora

Filed under
Linux

felipec.wordpress: For quite some people it seems if you use Fedora you are committing an open source sin; at best it seems as if there is no good reason to use it, or so has been my experience.

Ubuntu Essentials

Filed under
Ubuntu

open-zone.com: I'm Ubuntu user for years now. I have gained a lot of knowledge on how to customize my Ubuntu box and how to make it better. This guide targets any Ubuntu user or any one is thinking about trying Ubuntu but it will be very useful for newbies.

Explore the Universe from your Desktop with Celestia

Filed under
Software

techthrob.com: While it may not let you go where no man has gone before, Celestia is an amazing desktop application that lets you travel anywhere in the known Universe.

Open source disruption realized

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: Open source fans are buzzing about Microsoft’s latest move to open its APIs, which follows along the path it has been on recently. Another announcement they may have been somewhat overshadowed is chipmaker AMD’s new open source application library project, Framewave. I would say this is just another case of companies coming around to market realities.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos