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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Chromecast devices target HDTVs and sound systems Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 11:08am
Story Hadoop/Spark Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 11:06am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 11:04am
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 11:03am
Story Linux Gaming Keeps Getting Better Rianne Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 10:53am
Story The Linux Foundation Says You Should Install Linux on Your Chromebook Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 10:32am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 10:18am
Story How Would Software Freedom Have Helped With VW? Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 9:05am
Story ScudCloud, Slack Client For Linux Install In Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora Mohd Sohail 30/09/2015 - 3:12am
Story Microsoft's “embrace, extend, extinguish” Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2015 - 1:36am

Screenshot Tour: Our Favorite New Features in Ubuntu 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

lifehacker.com: Ubuntu 10.10, due for release this Sunday, adds a lot of little things here and there to the Linux system, but also some entirely new, great stuff. Here are the most useful and impressive new features in "Maverick Meerkat."

Linux Could Be A Problem For MMO Handheld The Jungle

Filed under
Gaming

kotaku.com: Panasonic's recently unveiled portable massively multiplayer online gaming platform won't be a success, can't be a success if there are no games to play on it.

LinuxUsers kernel column #92 with Jon Masters

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: This month Linux kernel legend Jon Masters talks about the release period of 2.6.35 and the opening of the merge window. Also this month: old security vulnerabilities, AppArmor, SELinux and the ongoing suspend blockers debate continues…

5 Operating Systems Making Big Waves This Week

Filed under
OS

serverwatch.com: It's been a busy week for operating systems (OSes). Here's a rundown of what happened and the implications.

LPI and My First International Proctoring “Job”

Filed under
Linux

blog.lpi.org: One of the contributions that I have lent to LPI, and of which I am very proud, is the constant drum beat about making LPI multinational.

Debian Project News - October 4th

Filed under
Linux

Constantly Usable Testing (CUT) update, Bits from the FTP Team, Report about this year's Google Summer of Code, and Bits from the Publicity Team.

Linux Gazette October 2010 (#179):

Filed under
Linux

Henry's Techno-Musings: User Interfaces, A Nightmare on Tape Drive, Making Your Network Transparent, Time Management for System Administrators, Controlling DC Motors from your Linux Box, and Collaboration Tools for Linux.

How To Integrate ClamAV Into ProFTPd For Virus Scanning On Debian Lenny

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial explains how you can integrate ClamAV into ProFTPd for virus scanning on a Debian Lenny system. This is achieved through mod_clamav. In the end, whenever a file gets uploaded through ProFTPd, ClamAV will check the file and delete it if it is malware.

Ubuntu's Real Contribution to Free Software

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Reactions to Ubuntu are rarely balanced. Too often, people love or hate it so extravagantly that the opinions negate themselves. So exactly what does Ubuntu contribute to free software?

Windows v Linux on a new laptop

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxinexile.blogspot: So I've moved on to a different organization. Once at the new office, I received a new laptop: a Dell Latitude E6410. This is a pretty nice machine. It came from the factory with Windows Vista Basic pre-installed, but of course I wanted to put Linux on it.

Sabayon 5.4 review

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Sabayon 5.4, released at the end of last month (September, 2010), is the latest version of the Gentoo-based, multi-purpose Linux distribution.

Mandriva XFCE 2010 Spring is a big disappoinment

Filed under
Software
MDV

cellguru.co.cc: Mandriva XFCE is a lightweight distro but I don't think so because it failed to install in my PC that supports KDE 4.5, Windows 7 and Vista. then How can I say it as light weight.But it installed successfully on my friend PC who has high end Configuration.

Another Look at KDE and Amarok Part 1

Filed under
KDE
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com: As I’ve mentioned before, I used to be really excited about KDE. It’s been a while since I last looked at KDE. Well, technically, I couldn’t really do much there. But there’s this time I was able to look at it. Let me just say that I no longer agree that it’s uglier than Gnome.

Top things to do after installing Ubuntu 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

unixmen.com: The final release of Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat will be out this week, after you install or upgrade to this new release you will need to customize your ubuntu by installing all needed software, tools, games and repositories in your system.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Bradley M. Kuhn appointed Executive Director of Software Freedom Conservancy
  • The black perl -Sabayon 5.4 Screenshot Tour
  • Contributing to an open source project
  • mv, mf, Ubuntu’s “did you mean?”
  • Mutt and evolution-data-server
  • Addictive Linux Game 'Steel Storm' Released
  • TuxRadar Open Ballot: is Graham Morrison wrong?
  • Linux Action Show | s13e10: Are Big Distros Innovating?
  • Debian GNU/Linux Evolves
  • Sourceforge Project of the Month: jEdit
  • LinuxCrazy Podcast 83 Stabilization
  • VIDEO: Duke Nukem Forever Date, Live Footage

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Custom Compiz Effects configuration in Ubuntu10.10
  • How to connect to WEP encrypted wireless with wicd on Linux
  • How To Use Imdb-Thumbnailer [Version 0.8.2, Released]
  • Create OpenDocument invoices and other documents with Rexx
  • Speed up Internet access & browsing in Ubuntu by disabling ipv6
  • OpenOffice.org Draw: Objects and Their Problems
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Maverik Meerkat Install Guide
  • More Free Guides to GIMP, for Maximum Graphics Muscle
  • Copying Debian package selections to a new machine
  • Installing and using SNORT on Ubuntu
  • Gnome Partition Editor: The Dearly GParted
  • Get a Random fortune cookie using the Unix fortune command
  • DragonDisk: A Free Amazon S3 Desktop Client For Linux And Windows
  • Recover your deleted jpeg pictures - recoverjpeg
  • PAM : Pluggable Authentication Modules
  • How To Configure Ubuntu To Open The Applications Menu With Windows Key
  • Add brushes to The GIMP
  • Resizing qcow2 images
  • Canon LiDE100 scanner in Mandriva
  • HTC-style Weather Clock for your desktop
  • How to take screencast on Linux ffmpeg
  • Do Secure Delete Tools work with Journaled Filesystems?
  • The Ultimate Linux Soft and Hard Link Guide (10 Ln Command Examples)
  • Elegant Gnome Pack-A beautiful most complete dark theme for Gnome

Take this GUI and shove it

Filed under
Software
SUSE

infoworld.com: A few weeks ago, I posted a bit of advice for VMware amid speculation that the leading virtualization company might purchase Suse Linux from Novell. (As in: Don't do it.) Since then, I've taken hits in comments and in email, mostly in reponse to my criticism of the YaST tool that serves as Suse's central management console.

Red Hat settles patent case with Acacia - shares few details

Filed under
Linux
Legal

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat has settled an alleged patent infringement case with IP firm Acacia Research Corporation around U.S. Patent #6,163,776. That particular case was pending in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, Civil Action No: 6:09-cv-00097-LED.

Simon Phipps unbound

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com: One of the great pleasures I experienced at last week’s Open World Forum in Paris was to see Simon Phipps unbound.

Penguins Old, Penguins New, Penguins Battered and Penguins Blue

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Moving from Windows to Linux takes more than commitment -- "it takes understanding both systems well and how to rethink the network in the event of such a move. I usually tell people that successful migrations are done slowly over five to seven years, and that anything faster than that is always very painful."

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME Development and Events

  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0
    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work. However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.
  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar
    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.
  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await
    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.
  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)
    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!
  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid
    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.
  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros
    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30. Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes: - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

KDE: Plasma Widgets, PIM Update and More

  • 3 Students Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2018
    Since 2006, we have had the opportunity for Google to sponsor students to help out with Krita. For 2018 we have 3 talented students working over the summer. Over the next few months they will be getting more familiar with the Krita code base and working on their projects. They will be blogging about their experience and what they are learning along the way. We will be sure to share any progress or information along the way. Here is a summary of their projects and what they hope to achieve.
  • Plasma widgets – Beltway Bandit Unlimited
    The concept of addons is an interesting one. At some point over the past decade or two, companies developing (successful) software realized that bundling an ever-growing code base into their products in order to meet the spiraling tower of requests from their users would result in unsustainable bloat and complexity that would not warrant the new functionality. And so, the idea of addons was born. Addons come in many flavors – extensions, plugins, applets, scripts, and of course, widgets. A large number of popular programs have incorporated them, and when done with style, the extra functionality becomes as important as the core application itself. Examples that come to mind: Firefox, Notepad++, VLC, Blender. And then, there’s the Plasma desktop environment. Since inception, KDE has prided itself on offering complete solutions, and the last incarnation of its UI framework is no different. Which begs the question, what, how and why would anyone need Plasma widgets? We explore. [...] Conclusion A good mean needs no seasoning, indeed. And Plasma is a proof of that, with the widgets the best example. Remarkably, this desktop environment manages to juggle the million different usage needs and create a balanced compromise that offers pretty much everything without over-simplifying the usage in any particular category. It’s a really amazing achievement, because normally, the sum of all requests is a boring, useless muddle. Plasma’s default showing is rich, layered, complex yet accessible, and consistent. And that means it does not really need any widgets. This shows. The extras are largely redundant, with some brilliant occasional usage models here and there, but nothing drastic or critical that you don’t get out of the box. This makes Plasma different from most other addons-blessed frameworks, as they do significantly benefit from the extras, and in some cases, the extensions and plugins are critical in supplementing the missing basics. And so, if you wonder, whether you’ll embark on a wonderful journey of discovery and fun with Plasma widgets, the answer is no. Plasma offers 99% of everything you may need right there, and the extras are more to keep people busy rather than give you anything cardinal. After all, if it’s missing, it should be an integral part of the desktop environment, and the KDE folks know this. So if you’re disappointed with this article, don’t be. It means the baseline is solid, and that’s where you journey of wonders and adventure should and will be focused. 
  • My KDE PIM Update
    This blog post is long overdue, but now that I’m back home from the KDE PIM Sprint in Toulouse, which took place last weekend, there’s some more news to report.
  • KDAB at QtDay 2018
    QtDay is the yearly Italian conference about Qt and Qt-related technologies. Its 2018 edition (the seventh so far!) will be once more in the beautiful city of Florence, on May 23 and 24. And, once more, KDAB will be there.
  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with KDE
    It’s been 2 days since the GSoC accepted student list was announced and I’m still getting goosebumps thinking about the moment I saw my name on the website. I started contributing to open source after attending a GSoC session in our college by one of our senior and a previous GSoC student with KDE: Aroonav Mishra. I was very inspired by the program and that defined the turning point of my life. [...] Then I came across GCompris and it caught my eye. I started contributing to it and the mentors are really very helpful and supportive. They always guided me whenever I needed any help  or was stuck at anything. Under their guidance, I learnt many things during the period of my contributions. I had never thought I would get this far.

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