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Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 4:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 11:49am
Story OpenDaylight: One open source SDN controller to rule them all? Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 7:50am
Story A KDecoration2 update Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 7:33am
Story Sleep tracker, Deepin Linux Roy Schestowitz 27/07/2014 - 7:20am
Story Open Source and the Challenge of Making Money Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 8:29pm
Story The Power Consumption & Efficiency Of Open-Source Linux GPU Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 8:24pm
Story OnePlus coming to India! Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 8:23pm
Story Ripe Linux Nits To Pick Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 8:06pm
Story GCC Receives ACM’s 2014 Programming Languages Software Award Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:32pm

Etch Is Still Better

Filed under
Linux

jehurst.wordpress: I’m not sure why, but after testing Lenny several different ways, Etch is still better. In fact, Lenny is downright inferior.

Review: Battle for Wesnoth 1.6

Filed under
Gaming

tuxarena.blogspot: After more than a year of constant development, The Battle for Wesnoth 1.6 was put out on March 22. This release comes with new graphics and unit portraits, a new campaign, called 'Legend of Wesmere', the possibility to log into the multiplayer with the forum account, and many, many other improvements.

First Look: Parsix 2.0r0

Filed under
Linux

news.softpedia.com: With the spring settling in more and more everyday and flowers blooming all over the place, we thought it would be appropriate to take a first look at the Persian flower distribution that goes by the name of Parsix 2.0r0.

Do Linux users pay a "Microsoft tax?"

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Steve Ballmer recently caught flack for essentially saying that Apple users pay an Apple tax of $500 for buying Macs compared to PCs. Does that mean that Linux users are forced to pay a Microsoft tax every time they buy a PC with Microsoft software on it?

Getting Rid of Nasty Flash Cookies on Linux

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Flash cookies are the secret nasties of using the Flash player on any platform. These are somewhat like the ordinary HTTP cookies that Web sites infest on our systems. Some HTTP cookies have useful purpose, but the majority of HTTP cookies are tracking cookies.

OpenGL 3.1 Released Plus New Audio Standard

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Nine months ago the Khronos Group released the specification to OpenGL 3.0. OpenGL 3.0 brought version 1.30 of the GL Shading Language, the introduction of Vertex Array Objects, texture arrays, more flexible frame-buffer objects, and a number of other graphical features.

Next GNOME Foundation Elections

Filed under
Software

vuntz.net: I's time for people to start thinking hard if they want to run for the elections. People usually don't think they can run for the elections; maybe they feel they're not involved enough in GNOME, or they don't feel like they are able to help, or there's some other random reason to not run.

Choosing Your Window Manager and Desktop Environment

Filed under
Software

maximumpc.com: The Linux graphical user interface (GUI) system may be very different from what you are used to if you are coming from a Windows or Mac OS X background. This guide will help you to choose a window manager/desktop environment by introducing you to several of them and addressing their strengths and weaknesses.

Chrome for Linux may shake up Firefox

Filed under
Software

mybroadband.co.za: Linux users can now get an early taste of Google's Chrome browser through the Chromium project. Although not an official Chrome release Chromium is an open source project on which the official Chrome browser is based.

Creative Labs Continues To Shaft Linux

phoronix.com: It has been a while since last mentioning the Creative X-Fi sound cards at Phoronix, but it's not because the Linux support is all nice and working now that Creative open-sourced their X-Fi driver, but rather things have stalled.

The First Linux Botnet

Filed under
Software

eweek.com: It never made sense that you could make a botnet out of Linux desktop users, but the people who built psyb0t knew its users don't pay attention to it.

Linux versus Windows - the truth

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

devoracles.com: Oh, here we go, yet another “is Linux better than windows”. The internet is full of this discussion, but sick of reading biased opinions I thought it was time to make an unbiased one!

GoblinX Releases G:Mini 3.0.rc01

Filed under
News

The GoblinX Project just announced the release of the G:Mini 3.0.rc01 (2.9.90).

A Short Introduction To Apt-Pinning

Filed under
HowTos

This article is a short overview of how to use apt-pinning on Debian and Debian-based distributions (like Ubuntu). Apt-Pinning allows you to use multiple releases (e.g. stable, testing, and unstable) on your system and to specify when to install a package from which release.

Inside Microsoft's landmark Novell deal

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

news.cnet.com: Just two days before Microsoft and Novell signed a controversial deal in 2006, the two sides still hadn't figured out a way to make peace over Linux without violating the licensing terms that govern the open-source operating system.

Taking your first Linux baby steps

Filed under
Linux

examiner.com: There is a wide range of distros for just about every conceivable purpose. Linux Mint is built to be very user friendly. It comes with great software for just about any task, codecs for multimedia enjoyments, and browser plugins for full Web participation.

Zenwalk 6.0: Not Quite Ready

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: In this Ubuntu world, distributions such as Zenwalk go relatively unnoticed, yet offer great features to those that know about them.

Test-Driving KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

workswithu.com: For three years, I’ve been a happy Gnome user. I’m still a happy Gnome user, but I’ve heard some buzz about KDE 4 lately and figured I’d give it a try.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more

Braswell based Pico-ITX SBC offers multiple expansion options

Axiomtek’s PICO300 is a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel Braswell, SATA-600, extended temperature support, and both a mini-PCIe and homegrown expansion connector. Axiomtek has launched a variation on its recently announced Intel Apollo Lake based PICO312 SBC that switches to the older Intel Braswell generation and offers a slightly reduced feature set. The board layout has also changed somewhat, with LVDS, SATA, and USB ports all changing location. Read more