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Thursday, 21 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 2:45pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 2:45pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 2:44pm
Story Open-Source Solutions As A Business Model Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 1:15pm
Story Review: LibreOffice 4.4 raises the bar Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 1:01pm
Story GNOME Photos Gets a Bugfix Update, Just in Time for GNOME 3.16 Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 12:00pm
Story SageTV to go open source (four years after Google acquired the media center/DVR software) Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 11:51am
Story 'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 11:23am
Story Watch Your Freedom (Because Apple's Not) Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 9:59am
Story 5 best Linux distros for beginners and newbies Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2015 - 8:00am

18-Button OpenOffice Mouse is Now WarMouse Meta

Filed under
Hardware

maximumpc.com: Remember the OpenOffice mouse with an insane amount of buttons? The funky peripheral was designed with the help of WarMouse, a UK company who today announced the "18-button freak" will now be known as the WarMouse Meta.

15 Minimalist Linux Wallpapers for a Distraction-free Desktop

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: I have here a collection of minimalist Linux-related wallpapers that could help give you a distraction-free desktop:

Linux Mint Fluxbox CE, resurrected

Filed under
Linux
Fluxbox

linuxmint.com: The Fluxbox Community Edition produced releases for Linux Mint 5 “Elyssa” and Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” and it became quite popular among Linux Mint users. During the release cycle for Linux Mint 7 “Gloria”, no Fluxbox edition was released.

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.

Ubuntu users Poll

Filed under
Site News

If you are (or were) an Ubuntu user and haven't voted in our latest poll, I ask that you please consider doing so now.

A quick look at prerelease mc 4.7.0

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I decided to go wild the other day, and build a brand-spanking-new version of Midnight Commander, pulling down a prerelease version of 4.7.0. mc is one of those programs that make life at the console an utter joy, just because of the sheer beauty and perfect convenience of it.

Novell rejigs self, waves bye to CTO

Filed under
SUSE

theregister.co.uk: NetWare and Linux operating system seller Novell has been trying to expand into other markets since the late 1980s, and it has reorganized so many times it is hard to keep track. Today, the company did it again, saying that effective January 1, it would be consolidating from four different business units down to two.

Gwenview the best image viewer

Filed under
Software

linuxcrunch.com: KDE4 users know Gwenview the default image viewer for KDE, but may not know that Gwenview is one of the best image viewers ever existed.

The Future Of Ubuntu Software Center

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Software Center (initially Ubuntu Software Store) was released with Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala and it currently has only a few of the features it was designed for, being just stage 1 out of 4.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Docky Themes [Yes, Themes for Docky!]
  • 12 Days Of Xmas: Best Apps Of 2009 – Day One
  • Upcoming KDE SC 4.4 Gains Positive Reviews
  • Top 10 Google chrome Extensions
  • Kernel Log: Linux 2.6.33 to include Nvidia graphics driver nouveau
  • Don’t lose sight of your dreams, Szulik tells Appalachian graduates
  • Open source means cost savings
  • Open source: All about vendors?
  • New Ryan Gordon Game Port Goes Into Beta
  • Last Minute Geek Gifts
  • SUSE Studio named an eWEEK 2009 Enterprise IT Product of the Year
  • Red Hat Guides, Guns for Java EE Developers
  • From the White House to (no kidding) Microsoft, open source shined in '09
  • Plasma and KWin
  • Kennards' Linux switch-back over a year ago
  • Phatch – Batch process thousands of images at once

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Tech Tip: Periodically Update Your MOTD with update-motd
  • 6 Different Ways To End Unresponsive Programs In Linux
  • Online Desktop Integration with KDE4
  • 64-Bit Native Linux Macromedia Flash – openSUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu
  • BIND DNS: Disable Dynamic Updates
  • How I Shutdown Fluxbox
  • Unix and Linux startup scripts, Part 3
  • Best Linux and KVM switch practices
  • Create a cool wax seal with an engraved eagle in GIMP
  • Recursive Regular Expressions
  • Leave the Num Lock on
  • Adding the Debian menu in Window Maker

Why GNU/Linux is ready for the Average User

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: I spend a fair amount of time on UbuntuForums.org and while poking around there this afternoon I came across this thread. To quickly sum up the thread the original poster is detailing why he believes Ubuntu is not ready for the "average user" because of a recent poor experience he had.

Why do I use Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

scottnesbitt.net: Because it works. Yes, it’s that simple. Because. It. Works. Case in point:

Open source commemorative challenge coin minted

Filed under
OSS
Web

itwire.com: Need something unique for the open source Linux-loving GNU-spouting Free Software Foundation member in your life? ThinkGeek has the answer.

Fine-Tune The Kernel

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: One of the advantages we Linux geeks like to claim over competing operating systems is the flexibility of the system. We're not talking about changing your screen saver--we're talking the guts of the operating system itself.

Chrome OS and the death of the Free desktop: a response

freesoftwaremagazine.com: The article “Google Chrome OS. Or, how KDE and GNOME managed to shoot each other dead” is intentionally outspoken and controversial. It invites comment and criticism - one can hardly declare two of the best known and most widely used Free Software projects to be “dead” without causing uproar.

A look at Linux in the recession: Linux 2009 year in review

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: The big story of 2009 was the economy. After the collapse of major financial institutions in the fall of 2008, people began looking for a silver lining in open source and Linux. Here are some highlights from the Linux world in 2009.

KDE TimeVault Progress Update

Filed under
Software

blog.chatonka.com: TimeVault is alive! Ok, so maybe it was never really dead. But I’ve found some time to work it and after reworking most of the internals I’ve finally gotten it to back up again.

NVIDIA's Response To Recent Nouveau Work

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: Last week after many DRM improvements went into the Linux 2.6.33 kernel Linus Torvalds got a bit upset and wanted Nouveau merged into the mainline kernel. This essentially spells the end of the xf86-video-nv driver, which was never good and should have died off long ago.

Lucid Alpha 1 – Fewer Games, Installer Changes, Impatient Friendly

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Alpha 1 was released late last week and although very little cosmetically has changed, we’ve pointed out the obvious changes below.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.