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Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 19 Linux, “Schrödinger's Cat," goes beta srlinuxx 29/05/2013 - 3:59am
Story Ubuntu Axe Laptop Competition After Just 2 Weeks srlinuxx 29/05/2013 - 3:58am
Story Next for Opera: Minimalist design, engine switcheroo srlinuxx 28/05/2013 - 9:38pm
Story Debian Linux 7.0 Wheezy: Hands on srlinuxx 28/05/2013 - 9:36pm
Story WD Se 4TB Enterprise Hard Drive Review srlinuxx 28/05/2013 - 9:33pm
Story 15 Less Known But Interesting Facts About Linux and Linus srlinuxx 28/05/2013 - 7:26pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 28/05/2013 - 4:03pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 28/05/2013 - 2:05pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 509 srlinuxx 27/05/2013 - 2:53pm
Story Debian Project News - May 27th srlinuxx 27/05/2013 - 2:51pm

Crystal Ball Sunday #4: Linux and System Builders and Integrators

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: Welcome to another edition of Crystal Ball Sunday! This week my predictions center around system builders and integrators and their use of Linux to lower costs, standardize hardware offerings, and provide a new systems to buyers that are ready to go to work.

What Makes Amarok the Most Popular Audio Player on Linux?

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: I used this player for about three years and I love it more and more, with each new release. Statistics show around 60% of the Linux users prefer Amarok over any other audio player. 60%! That's huge. This article lists 7 reasons for which I think this is the most loved audio player.

Also: Review of the New Banshee 1.0 Audio Player

82 year old runs PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

wamukota.blogspot: I told you already of the French Remaster I made for my 82-year old neighbor - I knew it was only a matter time before his Win2K would run into trouble. Two days ago, he informed me that he couldn't Skype anymore. The audio was gone. I went over, with the PCLOS French Remaster under my arm.

Ubuntu 8.04 LS Hardy Heron: Linux for Beginners?

Filed under
Ubuntu

damienkane.blogspot: I am writing this article after finally having some time to wipe out the dual booting Vista-Ubuntu 7.10 and install a dual boot Vista-Ubuntu 8.04 with long-term support (LTS) and thought I would give you a perspective.

Brand New Xubuntu on Damn Old Notebook

Filed under
Ubuntu

anujpathania.blogspot: Today I installed a brand new sparkling Xubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron, on my damn old crappy notebook. Additionally, not in a dual boot mode, but on the entire disk, getting rid of the Windows XP OEM pre-installed permanently for good. I can proudly say that Xubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron has finally landed in my life.

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 8.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu Studio 8.04 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Laptops Come to Schools in the Andes

  • Laptops in the most disadvantaged areas of Uruguay
  • An interview with slavik
  • Open Source Awards Accepting Nominations
  • Some more useful information about --as-needed
  • 7 Come 11 - Baby Needs a New Pair of SuSEs
  • Stable kernel 2.6.25.5 released
  • Ubuntu: A Window to Open-Source
  • the zen of python
  • WordPress vs. Drupal - Content Management Systems
  • The only TV and Movie Websites you Need

How I Found Puppy

Filed under
Linux

puppylinux.org/community/blogs: I came to Puppy out of necessity. I was supervising a project that aimed to recycle old "useless" PC's for charity. The son of a friend suggested I try Ubuntu. It was difficult to load and simply wouldn't work. We tried Mandrake/Mandriva, DSL, Mepis, XandrosCE, Slax, PCLinuxOS Mini-Me etc, etc. Then I found Puppy 2.00! Wow!

People of openSUSE: Cornelius Schumacher

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: Before openSUSE 11.0 GM get released next Thursday, we have the chance to meet Cornelius Schumacher - member of the incubation team, former Build Service developer, KDE vice president, and also the one who started writing down the openSUSE Guiding Principles.

Datamining Launchpad bugs

Filed under
Ubuntu

lucas-nussbaum.net: One thing that really is annoying with Launchpad is its lack of interfaces with the outside world. No SOAP interface, no easy way to export all bugs. The only way to get all the bug data in a machine-parseable is to first fetch this URL, and then, for each bug number listed there to make another request.

Eyeballs Needed for ODF

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: There is an announcement just posted about OASIS opening a new discussion list for members and nonmembers to discuss a proposal to form a new technical committee to help out with "ODF Implementation, Interoperability and Conformance". Yes, interoperability is the key. Rob Weir will lead the discussion.

An Exciting openSUSE Month

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: It has been several months since I blogged about exciting openSUSE stuff happening (all about at the same time). The next few weeks enough long in the work things are on the home stretch to make June an openSUSE month:

Celebrating 10 years of Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

2008 marks the tenth anniversary of Mandriva - the company and the distribution. The Mandriva community celebrated in style over the last weekend in May, with a party in the Eiffel Tower in Paris attended by many staff, former staff, community members and partners. There was also an - indoor - picnic, and the now-traditional Dance Dance Revolution party.

The GPL v3 Watch List For June 6

Filed under
OSS

gpl3.blogspot: The year has gone by quite quickly since the GPL v3 was first released. We have just entered into the month of the release, and it is only 23 days until a complete year has passed. It doesn't seem like we have been tracking the GPL v3 and its derivatives for a year, but it is more believable when you look at the count.

A Few Problems With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

codingexperiments.com: Since before the dawn of time, Linux users have argued over which distribution to use. But by far, Ubuntu, a massively popular Debian-based distribution, is the one most recommended by everybody. But under that famous shiny orange surgery coating, I believe lie some annoying problems.

Also: Ubuntu doesn't want the desktop

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Enable circular scrolling and more on your laptops synaptics touchpad

  • Screencasts in Ubuntu, part 2
  • How to embed Lua 5.1 in C++
  • How to enhance Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron eye-candy with Emerald Theme Manager
  • How To Log Boot Messages in Ubuntu
  • How To Install VMware Tools on Ubuntu 8.04 Guests
  • Installing NVIDIA Drivers on openSUSE 11.0 & other Linux Distrubutions
  • How to find a file and cd to its dirname using command substitution
  • Ubuntu login workaround

Testing KDE 4.1 Beta 1

Filed under
KDE

artipc10.vub.ac.be: During the past few days, I have been testing KDE 4.1 beta on Mandriva Cooker. Actually the version I tested is even a bit more recent than KDE 4.1 beta: Cooker currently includes the KDE 4.0.81 snapshot.

Which Linux distro is right for you?

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: In our earlier article — the Art of Linux — we saw some prominent features of the *NIX based operating system - Linux. The actual power of Linux can only be unleashed once we have an installation at our disposal. So before we move ahead in our quest of mastering Linux, we shall have to to make sure that each one of us have at least a copy of Linux installed on their machines.

On Gentoo Releases and stuff

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.i-no.de: When I got more involved with Gentoo, the release team was aiming to release the then-pending release (2007.1) in early December. Eventually, that date slipped time and again. It was decided to drop the entire release and do a new one (2008.0). Again, the dates kept slipping. Now, the question is why a release is slipping time and again.

What’s New In Screenlets?

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: When I first installed Screenlets half a year ago, I really didn’t like it. It took up a big chunk of memory and have only a limited quantity of widgets to choose from. With the release of the new 0.1.2 version, I decided to give it another shot.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.