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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 9:16pm
Story 2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Alexander Popov: Linux Kernel Contributor Roy Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 8:42pm
Story Rugged 3.5-inch SBC runs Linux or Android on i.MX6 Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 7:08pm
Story Qt 5 based Colorpick Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:57pm
Story Raspberry Pi Foundation's Code Club teaches kids skills to compete in our digital world Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:56pm
Story The long-awaited Maru OS source release Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:48pm
Story KaOS Brings Serious Relevance Back to KDE Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:46pm
Story Another Set of Updated Fedora 24 Linux Live ISO Images Are Now Ready to Download Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:43pm
Story LinuxConsole 2.5 Gaming Distro Out Now with Minecraft, SuperTux, and Many Games Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:42pm
Story KDE Connect 1.0 is here! Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:40pm

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Jay Beale: Linux Security and Remembering Bastille Linux

    Security expert and co-creator of the Linux-hardening (and now Unix-hardening) project Bastille Linux. That’s Jay Beale. He’s been working with Linux, and specifically on security, since the late 1980s. The greatest threat to Linux these days? According to Beale, the thing you really need to watch out for is your Android phone, which your handset manufacturer and wireless carrier may or may not be good about updating with the latest security patches. Even worse? Applications you get outside of the controlled Google Play and Amazon environments, where who-knows-what malware may lurk.

    On your regular desktop or laptop Linux installation, Beale says the best security precaution you can take is encrypting your hard drive — which isn’t at all hard to do. He and I also talked a bit, toward the end, about how “the Linux community” was so tiny, once upon a time, that it wasn’t hard to know most of its major players. He also has some words of encouragement for those of you who are new to Linux and possibly a bit confused now and then. We were all new and confused once upon a time, and got less confused as we learned. Guess what? You can learn, too, and you never know where that knowledge can take you.

  • Automotive security: How safe is a next-generation car?

    The vehicles we drive are becoming increasingly connected through a variety of technologies. Features such as keyless entry and self-diagnostics are becoming commonplace. Unfortunately, they can also introduce IT security issues.

  • Let's Encrypt: Every Server on the Internet Should Have a Certificate

    The web is not secure. As of August 2016, only 45.5 percent of Firefox page loads are HTTPS, according to Josh Aas, co-founder and executive director of Internet Security Research Group. This number should be 100 percent, he said in his talk called “Let’s Encrypt: A Free, Automated, and Open Certificate Authority” at LinuxCon North America.

    Why is HTTPS so important? Because without security, users are not in control of their data and unencrypted traffic can be modified. The web is wonderfully complex and, Aas said, it’s a fool’s errand to try to protect this certain thing or that. Instead, we need to protect everything. That’s why, in the summer of 2012, Aas and his friend and co-worker Eric Rescorla decided to address the problem and began working on what would become the Let’s Encrypt project.

  • OpenSSL 1.1 Released With Many Changes

    OpenSSL 1.1.0 was released today as a major update to this free software cryptography and SSL/TLS toolkit.

    In addition to OpenSSL 1.1 rolling out a new build system and new security levels and support for pipelining and a new threading API, security additions to OpenSSL 1.1 include adding the AFALG engine, support for ChaChao20 in libcrypto/libssl, scrypto algorithm support, and support for X25519, among many other additions.

  • Is Windows ​10’s ‘Hidden Administrator Account’ a security risk? [Ed: Damage control from Microsoft Jack (Jack Schofield) because Microsoft Windows is vulnerable by design]

4Duino combines Arduino, WiFi, and a 2.4-inch touchscreen

Filed under
Linux

4D Systems launched a $79 “4Duino-24” Arduino compatible board, with a 2.4-inch resistive touchscreen and an ESP8266 WiFi module.

One reason you might choose a Linux SBC like a Raspberry Pi over an Arduino is that it’s easier to control an LCD display for simple IoT GUIs and other HMI applications. Now the 4Duino-24 board aims to smooth the path to Arduino-based IoT displays with an Arduino Leonardo clone board that not only adds an ESP8266 WiFi module, but also includes a 2.4-inch TFT LCD display with resistive touch.

Read more

Also: Tegra TK1 COM Express module runs Ubuntu at 15W

The 25 biggest events in Linux's 25-year history

Filed under
Linux

You can argue about Linux's official birthday. Heck, even Linus Torvalds thinks there are four different dates in 1991 that might deserve the honor. Regardless, Linux is twenty-five years old this year. Here are some of its highlights and lowlights.

Read more

Also: 25 Years of Linux: What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been

Conferences and Kids

Filed under
OSS

I've taken my daughter, now 13, to FOSDEM in Brussels every year that I had slots there. She isn't a geek, yet enjoys the crowds and the freebies. When I could, I also took my kids to other events, where I was speaking. In this post I'd like to capture my feelings about why children should be part of conferences, and what conferences can do to make this easier.

First off, the "why?" Traditional conferences (in all domains, not just software) are boring, ritualized events where the participants compete to see who can send the most people to sleep at once. The real event starts later, over alcohol. It is a strictly adult affair, and what happens at the conf stays at the conf.

Now our business is a little different. It is far more participative. Despite our history of finicky magic technologies that seem to attract mainly male brains, we strive for diversity, openness, broad tolerance. Most of what we learn and teach comes through informal channels. Finished is formal education, elitism, and formal credentials. We are smashing the barriers of distance, wealth, background, gender, and age.

Read more

50 Essential Linux Applications

Filed under
Linux

If you’re a refugee from Windows, you may be finding the Linux world slightly confusing, wondering how you can get the all same functionality you had in Windows, but still enjoy the freedom that Linux offers. Never fear! Linux is not some scary, difficult to use monster that’s only used by hackers and programmers, it’s actually becoming more and more user friendly every day.

Read<br />
more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Debugging gnome-session problems on Ubuntu 14.04
  • Introducing snapd-glib
  • An awesome experience!

    GUADEC has been a week full of memorable moments. As my friend Rares mentioned in his post, our newcomers group was welcomed by friendly community members right as we arrived at the hotel. For someone who has never attended a similar event before, this really helped with getting into the conference atmosphere.

    In the first couple days of the conference, I found myself meeting a lot of people that I knew from IRC. It felt really nice to finally know the person behind the internet nick. I was especially excited about getting to meet my mentor, Carlos Soriano =). In between the presentations I also took the time to prepare my own lightning talk about compressed files in Nautilus. Speaking in front of the GNOME community for the first time was a unique experience.

  • Commvault Announces Support of Red Hat Virtualization 4 with Commvault Software
  • Modularity Infrastructure Design

    The purpose of our Modularity initiative is to support the building, maintaining, and shipping of modular things. So, in order to ensure these three requirements are met, we need to design a framework for building and composing the distribution.

    In terms of the framework, in general, we are concerned about the possibility of creating an exponential number of component combinations with independent lifecycles. That is, when the number of component combinations becomes too large, we will not be able to manage them. So that we don’t accidentally make our lives worse, we must limit the number of supported modules with a policy and provide infrastructure automation to reduce the amount of manual work required.

  • more, less, and a story of typical Unix fossilization

    In the beginning, by which we mean V7, Unix didn't have a pager at all. That was okay; Unix wasn't very visual in those days, partly because it was still sort of the era of the hard copy terminal. Then along came Berkeley and BSD. People at Berkeley were into CRT terminals, and so BSD Unix gave us things like vi and the first pager program, more (which showed up quite early, in 3BSD, although this isn't as early as vi, which appears in 2BSD). Calling a pager more is a little bit odd but it's a Unix type of name and from the beginning more prompted you with '--More--' at the bottom of the screen.

    All of the Unix vendors that based their work on BSD Unix (like Sun and DEC) naturally shipped versions of more along with the rest of the BSD programs, and so more spread around the BSD side of things. However, more was by no means the best pager ever; as you might expect, it was actually a bit primitive and lacking in features. So fairly early on Mark Nudelman wrote a pager with somewhat more features and it wound up being called less as somewhat of a joke. When less was distributed via Usenet's net.sources in 1985 it became immediately popular, as everyone could see that it was clearly nicer than more, and pretty soon it was reasonably ubiquitous on Unix machines (or at least ones that had some degree of access to stuff from Usenet). In 4.3 BSD, more itself picked up the 'page backwards' feature that had motived Mark Nudelman to write less, cf the 4.3BSD manpage, but this wasn't the only attraction of less. And this is where we get into Unix fossilization.

  • PNScan Linux Trojan Resurfaces with New Attacks Targeting Routers in India

    A trojan thought to have died out resurfaced with new attacks and a new and improved version, launching new attacks on routers running Linux-based firmware located in India's cyber-space.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • 4 tips for teaching kids how to build electronics

    Kids are naturally curious about how things work, and with a new trend in hardware companies creating open source hardware products, it's a great time to teach kids about electronics. But modern technology can seem too complex to even begin to understand. So where do you start?

  • Oil companies joining open source world by sharing data [Ed: No, oil companies, sharing data is open data and not open source. More openwashing, like greenwashing]

    The oil and gas industry has long collected huge volumes of data, but it hasn’t always known quite what to do with it all. Often, the terabytes aren’t even stored on computer systems that readily talk to each other.

    Industry insiders are used to it, said Michael Jones, senior director of strategy at the oil and gas software maker Landmark. But it’s not OK, he said. So, about a year ago, Jones and some of his oil industry colleagues set about to fix it.

    This week, at Landmark’s Innovation Forum & Expo at the Westin hotel in northwest Houston, the company unveiled the beginnings of a collaborative its members called groundbreaking. In a move to drive technology further, faster — and, perhaps, take a bigger piece of the burgeoning big-data market — Landmark is pushing its main computing platform into the cloud, for all to use.

  • Interactive, open source visualizations of nocturnal bird migrations in near real-time

    New flow visualizations using data from weather radar networks depict nocturnal bird migrations, according to a study published August 24, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Judy Shamoun-Baranes from University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues.

  • Go! Speed Racer Go!

    I finally reached a point where I could start running the go version of sm-photo-tool. I finished the option validation for the list command. While I was testing it I noticed how much faster the Go version felt. Here are the python vs Go versions of the commands.

  • Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services will be presented at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference

    The revision of the European Interoperability Framework and the importance of data and information standardisation for promoting semantic interoperability for European Public Services will be presented by Dr. Vassilios Peristeras, DG Informatics, ISA unit at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference which takes place in Leipzig on September 13th and 14th 2016. The title of the presentation is “Promoting Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services: the European Commission ISA2 Programme” (slideset to appear here soon).

Linux at 25: How Linux changed the world

Filed under
Linux

I walked into an apartment in Boston on a sunny day in June 1995. It was small and bohemian, with the normal detritus a pair of young men would scatter here and there. On the kitchen table was a 15-inch CRT display married to a fat, coverless PC case sitting on its side, network cables streaking back to a hub in the living room. The screen displayed a mess of data, the contents of some logfile, and sitting at the bottom was a Bash root prompt decorated in red and blue, the cursor blinking lazily.

I was no stranger to Unix, having spent plenty of time on commercial Unix systems like OSF/1, HP-UX, SunOS, and the newly christened Sun Solaris. But this was different.

Read more

Linux Kernel News and Microsoft Breaks PowerShell

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Coherent Accelerators, FPGAs, and PLD Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

    It has been more than a decade since CPU core clock frequencies stopped doubling every 18 months, which has shifted the search for performance from the "hardware free lunch" to concurrency and, more recently, hardware accelerators. Beyond accelerating computational offload, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and programmable logic devices (PLDs) have long been used in the embedded space to provide ways to offload I/O or to implement timing-sensitive algorithms as close as possible to the pin.

  • Linux's brilliant career, in pictures

    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.

  • Quarter Century of Innovation – aka Happy Birthday Linux!

    Happy birthday Linux. You’ve defined how we should be using and adoption technology. You’ve disrupted and continue to disrupt, industries all over the place. You’ve helped define what it means to share ideas openly and freely. You’ve shown what happens when we collaborate and work together. Free and Open Source is a win-win for all and Linux is the Gold Standard of that.

  • Microsoft Open Source Czar Takes Spotlight at LinuxCon [Ed: Microsoft paid for this]
  • Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week

    You'd be forgiven for thinking Microsoft is actively trying to stop people using Windows 10 Anniversary Edition. A patch this week broke one of the key features of the OS: PowerShell.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 unveiled in China, priced at $135

    Xiaomi took the wraps off their latest smartphone offering, the Redmi Note 4, earlier today, and as is expected from the budget-friendly Redmi series, the device offers a premium look, specifications, and features, and more importantly, an ultra-affordable price tag.

    The Redmi Note 4 retains the premium full metal unibody construction that was introduced with its predecessor, but now comes with a brushed metal finish and chamfered edges that looks and feels even better. The design language is quite similar as well, with the Redmi Note 4 also coming with a fingerprint scanner on the back.

    Under the hood, the Redmi Note 4 comes with a 5.5-inch Full HD display that is covered with a 2.5D curved glass panel. The phone is powered by a MediaTek Helio X20 processor, that is backed by the Mali-T880MP4 GPU and 2 GB or 3 GB of RAM. 16 GB or 64 GB are the on-board storage options available, which also dictates how much RAM you get, and you also get expandable storage via microSD card to cover all your needs. Keeping everything running is a huge 4,100 mAh battery.

  • New study finds iPhones fail far more often than Android phones

    Apple customers are generally a shockingly loyal bunch. The company’s high repeat customer rate can be attributed to a combination of factors that concern iPhones themselves as well as Apple’s industry-leading customer service. Dealing with Apple’s customer care department has always been a pleasure compared to dealing with rival companies, and iPhones themselves have historically been very reliable, offering a consistently smooth user experience that people love.

  • Relax, Spire can now connect to Android phones

    Spire, the wearable that promises to help you with healthy breathing and mindfulness, was previously only available for iOS devices. But that should change with an update rolling out now.

  • Android 7.0 Nougat: Small changes that make a big difference in UX

    The seventh iteration of Android (Nougat) has finally been released by the mighty Google. If you happen to be the owner of a Nexus device, you might see this update very soon. Everyone else...you know the drill.

    So after an extended period of waiting for the update to trickle through your carrier and onto your device, what can you expect to happen to your Android device once its center has become a creamier shade of Nougat?

  • Two Nokia Android smartphones show up in benchmark

    Nokia is definitely coming out with a few Android smartphones later this year, but today's Nokia has little in common with the company that ruled the mobile phone industry for years.

    For starters, the devices that will be released this year, or the next, will be made by a third-party company. Nokia won't be manufacturing phones anymore and most likely it won't manage the way they are sold through retailers and authorized resellers.

  • Proxima bae, Instagram scams, Android goes full crypto: ICYMI
  • PayPal adds proper Nexus Imprint fingerprint login support on Android
  • Google Duo has been downloaded 5 million times on Android since its release

Comparison of the Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 Tizen smartphones

Filed under
Linux

Compare Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3 Tizen Smartphones

Lets do a quick history lesson: The first Tizen Smartphone was the Samsung Z1, then came the Z3, and yesterday was the turn of the 4G touting Z2 to take centre stage. On the whole the Z2 is very similar to the Z1 and can be thought of a Z1 2016 edition with the inclusion of 4G cellular connectivity and updated software with user requested features.

Read more

25 things to love about Linux

Filed under
Linux

Today marks 25 years of Linux, the most successful software ever.

At LinuxCon this week, Jim Zemlin of the Linux Foundation spoke words of admiration, praise, and excitement from the keynote stage, saying "Linux at 25 is a big thing" and "You can better yourself while bettering others at the same time."

To celebrate, we asked our readers what they love about Linux and rounded up 25 of their responses. Dive into the Linux love!

Read more

GNU/FSF

Filed under
GNU

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs

    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all.

    Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.

  • Happy Birthday Linux

    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it

  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset

    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel.

    To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present.

    The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.

  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa

    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free

    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool.

    No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire.

    Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab.

    Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment.

    Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Achieve Global Domination in Agenda, Coming to PC, Mac, Linux on September 21

    Agenda, a strategy simulation from Exordium Games where players control an evil organization seeking world domination, will come to Windows, Mac, and Linux on Sept. 21st, 2016.

    Players will direct covert operations to increase their control over countries' economies, political parties, militaries, science institutions and media outlets. Operations will entail everything from low key kickbacks to military leaders to the brazen assassination of political rivals.

  • Vendetta Online 1.8.385 MMORPG Drastically Improves Chat and Effect Delays

    Guild Software announced the release of a new maintenance update for their popular and cross-platform Vendetta Online MMORPG (Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) 3D space combat title.

    According to the release notes, Vendetta Online 1.8.385 is an important milestone, and it's here to drastically improve the chat and effect delays reported by users during larger capship battles by implementing a new dynamic server packet-queuing and priority change system, which was tested internally with 200 close-proximity capships per battle.

  • Looks like Subnautica from the Natural Selection 2 developers won't get Linux support

    This is quite sad, it seems we have been left wondering for a while (years) about Subnautica, but a developer has now confirmed a Linux version is not being worked on.

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More in Tux Machines

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more

Rise of the Forks: Nextcloud and LibreOffice

  • ownCloud-Forked Nextcloud 10 Now Available
  • Secure, Monitor and Control your data with Nextcloud 10 – get it now!
    Nextcloud 10 is now available with many new features for system administrators to control and direct the flow of data between users on a Nextcloud server. Rule based file tagging and responding to these tags as well as other triggers like physical location, user group, file properties and request type enables administrators to specifically deny access to, convert, delete or retain data following business or legal requirements. Monitoring, security, performance and usability improvements complement this release, enabling larger and more efficient Nextcloud installations. You can get it on our install page or read on for details.
  • What makes a great Open Source project?
    Recently the Document Foundation has published its annual report for the year 2015. You can download it as a pdf by following this link, and you can now even purchase a paper copy of the report. This publication gives me the opportunity to talk a bit about what I think makes a great FOSS project and what I understand may be a great community. If it is possible to see this topic as something many people already went over and over again, think again: Free & Open Source Software is seen as having kept and even increased its momentum these past few years, with many innovative companies developing and distributing software licensed under a Free & Open Source license from the very beginning. This trend indicates two important points: FOSS is no longer something you can automagically use as a nice tag slapped on a commodity software; and FOSS projects cannot really be treated as afterthoughts or “nice-to-haves”. Gone are the days where many vendors could claim to be sympathetic and even supportive to FOSS but only insofar as their double-digits forecasted new software solution would not be affected by a cumbersome “community of developers”. Innovation relies on, starts with, runs thanks to FOSS technologies and practices. One question is to wonder what comes next. Another one is to wonder why Open Source is still seen as a complex maze of concepts and practices by so many in the IT industry. This post will try to address one major difficulty of FOSS: why do some projects fail while others succeed.

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Virtualisation 4 woos VMware faithful
    It is easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn’t forgotten about you. Red Hat Virtualisation (RHV) 4.0 refreshes Red Hat’s open source virtualisation platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat’s product line. It is a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat’s virtualisation efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company’s intention to woo VMware customers.
  • Forbes Names Red Hat One of the World's Most Innovative Companies
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it has been named to Forbes' “World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. Red Hat was ranked as the 25th most innovative company in the world, marking the company's fourth appearance on the list (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Red Hat was named to Forbes' "World's Most Innovative Growth Companies" list in 2011.
  • Is this Large Market Cap Stock target price reasonable for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • World Wide Web became what it is thanks to Linux
    Linux is used to power the largest websites on the Internet, including Google, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, and Wikipedia.
  • SFC's Kuhn in firing line as Linus Torvalds takes aim
    A few days after he mused that there had been no reason for him to blow his stack recently, Linux creator Linus Torvalds has directed a blast at the Software Freedom Conservancy and its distinguished technologist Bradley Kuhn over the question of enforcing compliance of the GNU General Public Licence. Torvalds' rant came on Friday, as usual on a mailing list and on a thread which was started by Software Freedom Conservancy head Karen Sandler on Wednesday last week. She suggested that Linuxcon in Toronto, held from Monday to Thursday, also include a session on GPL enforcement.
  • Linux at 25: A pictorial history
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.