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Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Options for Open Source Software Support Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 3:39pm
Story 5 Linux Desktop Environments on the Rise for 2017 Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 2:58pm
Story GNOME 3.23.4 Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 2:44pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 2:32pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 11:41am
Story What is Linux? Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 11:40am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 11:39am
Story Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 11:38am
Story Kernel Space/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 11:37am
Story Graphics in Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2017 - 11:36am

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

The GPL in Layman’s Terms - Free as in What?

Filed under
Linux
Legal

Through the glazed-over eyes of friends and family, past that painful look of well-intended but feigned interest, I can clearly see a fundamental lack of understanding about this free software I’m constantly going on about.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

The Best Linux Distros to Watch Out for in 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In 2016 Linux made modest gains in the desktop market. There is a lot of speculation out there from many people as to why Linux had a good year. Some of this is attributed to the lukewarm reception of the new Macbook Pro and the overall decline in usage of Mac OS. Others say it’s the natural evolution of Linux and that the operating system is bound to see gains eventually.

Regardless of the reason, because Linux saw a tiny uptick in users in 2016, many new and lesser-known Linux distributions gained a lot more attention. In 2017 we expect these same Linux distributions to make even more gains in popularity.

Below are the distros Linux fans should keep an eye on in 2017.

1. Solus

Read more

Also: Adopting Flatpak To Reassemble Third Party Applications

Mesa 17.0 RC1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA Linux OpenCL Performance vs. Radeon ROCm / AMDGPU-PRO

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this week I posted some benchmarks of GPUOpen's new Radeon Open Compute ROCm OpenCL stack that premiered last month and they are working to make completely open-source. In those initial benchmarks I compared the ROCm 1.4 OpenCL performance to the existing AMDGPU-PRO OpenCL implementation on Linux. For those wondering how these two Radeon OpenCL stacks compare to NVIDIA, here are some fresh benchmarks.

Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Download Links & Torrents for Debian 8.7 GNU/Linux

    Debian 8.7 GNU/Linux has been released at January 14th 2017. This is an update for Debian 8 (stable, Jessie) mainly for fixing security issues. Here I listed download links for 64 bit and 32 bit versions including torrent links. This article is intended as simple guide for new comers into Debian.

  • This Dev Is Working on a Way to Run Android Apps on Ubuntu Phone

    I’m writing about this way too early, but I figured it may help stoke a few fading hearts among the Ubuntu Phone faithful in light of recent news.

    Ubports developer (and all round awesome dude) Marius Grispgård has revealed that he’s working on a way to run Android apps on Ubuntu Phone.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Release Schedule

    Ubuntu 17.04, which has got codename 'Zesty Zapus', is currently penciled in to ship on 13th April, 2017. The release date for Ubuntu 17.04 has now been firmed up as are the other development milestones leading up to the mid-April, currently we know that Unity 8 is going to be the interesting feature which will be shipped in 17.04 and swap partitions will likely to be replaced by swap files as mentioned by Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov, and rest what's new coming in this release we don't know.

GNU/Linux and Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Best Linux remote desktop clients: Top 5 RDC in 2017

    This article was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here.

    SSH has been the staple remote access tool for the sysadmins since its advent. The cryptographic network protocol is synonymous with remote network services over an unsecured network. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of the everyday desktop users as well.

  • A Powerful Dual-Pane File Manager `Double Commander` New Update for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Double Commander is a powerful open source & cross platform file manager, inspired from total commander file manager but includes new ideas and features. It brings dual pane side by side experience to enhance the use of GUI for the user. The main window of the application is separated by two panels side by side that allow you to view the content of two different location or same and browse through folders with ease. For each file, image or folder, details such as name, extension, size, date and attributes are displayed in the list.

  • SoftMaker Office 2016 – Your alternative to LibreOffice?

    Depending on how you look at it, the world of office suites for Linux is either very rich or very poor. As the rather obscure idiom says: the tailor (hence the cliche suit reference) always goes naked. But in essence, you’re either using LibreOffice – used to be OpenOffice – or maybe something else. Probably nothing.

    However, there are quite a few office products for Linux: Kingsoft Office, SoftMaker Office, Calligra, standalone Abiword, some others, each offering a slightly different aesthetic and functional approach. We talked about this in the office suite competition article back in 2013, and a lot has changed since. LibreOffice finally became suitable for use side by side with Microsoft Office, as far as decent document conversion and fidelity go, and every one of these products has seen a large number of major and minor number increments. In the original piece, SoftMaker Office was kind of a dud, and it’s time to give it a full review. Let us.

  • Reports: PS4 is selling twice as well as Xbox One, overall [Ed: Xbox continues to be a loser]

    Microsoft stopped providing concrete sales data for its Xbox line years ago, making it hard to get a read on just how well the Xbox One is doing in the market compared to Sony's PlayStation 4. Recent numbers released by analysts this week, though, suggest that Sony continues to dominate this generation of the console wars, with the PS4 now selling twice as many units worldwide as the Xbox One since both systems launched in late 2013.

    The first set of numbers comes from a new SuperData report on the Nintendo Switch, which offhandedly mentions an installed base of 26 million Xbox One units and 55 million PS4 units. That report is backed up by Niko Partners analyst Daniel Ahmad, who recently tweeted a chart putting estimated Xbox One sales somewhere near the middle of the 25 million to 30 million range.

  • PPSSPP (PSP) Emulator 1.3.0 Version Released, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    PPSSPP is a PSP emulator written in C++, and translates PSP CPU instructions directly into optimized x86, x64 and ARM machine code, using JIT recompilers (dynarecs). PPSSPP is an open source project, licensed under the GPL. PPSSPP can run your PSP games on your PC in full HD resolution, it is cross-platform application. It can even upscale textures that would otherwise be too blurry as they were made for the small screen of the original PSP.

4.9 is a longterm kernel

Filed under
Linux

Might as well just mark it as such now, to head off the constant
questions. Yes, 4.9 is the next longterm supported kernel version.

Read more

Also: Yes, Linux 4.9 Is A Long-Term Kernel Release

openSUSE Package Management Cheat Sheet

Filed under
SUSE

Debian/Ubuntu have long been my primary Linux distributions, although like all good Linux users I have used Fedora, CentOS, Gentoo, Red Hat, Slackware, Arch Linux, Mageia, and other Linux distributions because why not? It is a feast of riches and the best playground there is.

I became a SUSE employee recently, so naturally I've been spending more time with openSUSE. openSUSE is sponsored by SUSE, and it is an independent community project. There are two openSUSE flavors: Tumbleweed and Leap. Tumbleweed is a bleeding-edge rolling release, containing the latest software versions. Leap is more conservative, and it incorporates core code from SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12. Both are plenty good for everyday use.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • How to get started contributing to Mozilla

    Open source participation offers a sea of benefits that can fine-tune and speed up your career in the tech, including but not limited to real-world technical experience and expanding your professional network. There are a lot of open source projects out there you can contribute to—of small, medium, and large size, as well as unknown and popular. In this article we'll focus on how to contribute to one of the largest and most popular open source projects on the web: Mozilla.

  • Digital Citizens, Let’s Talk About Internet Health

    Today, Mozilla is launching the prototype version of the Internet Health Report. With this open-source research project, we want to start a conversation with you, citizens of the Internet, about what is healthy, unhealthy, and what lies ahead for the Internet.

    When I first fell in love with the Internet in the mid-1990s, it was very much a commons that belonged to everyone: a place where anyone online could publish or make anything. They could do so without asking permission from a publisher, a banker or a government. It was a revelation. And it made me — and countless millions of others — very happy.

    Since then, the Internet has only grown as a platform for our collective creativity, invention and self expression. There will be five billion of us on the Internet by 2020. And vast swaths of it will remain as open and decentralized as they were in the early days. At least, that’s my hope.

    Yet when Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg shows up on the cover of The Economist depicted as a Roman emperor, I wonder: is the Internet being divided up into a few great empires monopolizing everyday activities like search, talking to friends or shopping? Can it remain truly open and decentralized?

  • Mozilla ditches the dinosaur, unveils new branding only a nerd could love

    The old Netscape browser had a dinosaur named Mozilla as its mascot and codename. When the browser was open sourced in 1998, it used the dinosaur's name and visage as its branding.

  • Mozilla releases The Internet Health Report, an open-source document with version 1.0 coming by year end

GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Are You Ready For Linux?

    Linux on the Desktop is well past the stage of being a plaything for computer hobbyists but it still isn’t at the stage where it could be considered completely mainstream. There’s still some way to go but Linux is fast gaining ground at an accelerating pace and lots of folks are looking at it as a serious alternative to Windows and Mac. People tend to bring some misconceptions about hardware and software to the table when they seek advice and support as they contemplate making the switch. In this article, I will address a few of the most common complaints I get from folks who come to me for help getting started with Linux. I try to be up-front and honest about what Linux can and can’t do for them but I also am quick to point out that the surest way to have a bad experience with Linux is to approach it too quickly.

  • Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

    Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started.

    But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000.

    [...]

    In this article, we discussed the feasibility of creating an entry level home recording studio for under $1,000. In the next article of this series, we will start to look at the software needed to turn our collection of hardware into a fully operational recording studio. We will install Ubuntu Studio, a Linux-based operating system that is made for audio recording, and extend its functionality with the software repositories from KXstudio. Looking forward to seeing you.

  • Lunduke Hour: Jan-17-2017, Dell Linux Hardware w/Barton George

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Get Yourself on www.kde.org
  • Which OpenGL implementation is my Qt Quick app using today?

    Qt Quick-based user interfaces have traditionally been requiring OpenGL, quite unsurprisingly, since the foundation of it all, the Qt Quick 2 scenegraph, is designed exclusively with OpenGL ES 2.0 (the top of the line for mobile/embedded at the time) in mind. As you may have heard, the graphics API story is a bit more inclusive in recent Qt versions, however the default OpenGL-based rendering path is, and is going to be, the number one choice for many applications and devices in the future. This raises the interesting question of OpenGL implementations.

  • Should you still be using QGraphicsView?

    There was a time when the Qt Graphics View Framework was seen as the solution to create modern user interfaces with Qt. Now that Qt Quick 2 has matured does the Graphics View Framework still have a place in Qt?

  • Google Code In ( Gcompris ) 2106-2017

    This year's Google Code In was awesome as before . There were instances of tasks successfully completed by the students . Out of 12 unique tasks 11 tasks were successfully attempted . The students were enthusiastic till the very end of the program. Most of the students solved multiple tasks that provided us with varied ideas .

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Raspberry Pi: A closer look at Raspbian PIXEL

Filed under
Linux

Over the past three posts, I have looked at a number of different Linux distributions for various models of the Raspberry Pi - including SUSE/openSUSE, Fedora, Manjaro and Ubuntu MATE, and PiCore Linux. What I haven't done yet is look at the latest version of the Raspberry Pi Foundation's own Linux distribution, Raspbian with their PIXEL desktop. So I will look at that first, and then I will wrap this series up.

I know that I just recently wrote about Raspbian PIXEL, but that was a sort of "what's new" overview, and in this post I want to go much deeper, and in a lot more detail, to provide some comparison to the other Linux distributions that I have been testing. So please bear with me...

Read more

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux: Why do people hate systemd?

    systemd has caused an almost unending amount of controversy in the Linux community. Some Linux users have been unyielding in their opposition to systemd, while others have been much more accepting.

    The topic of systemd came up in a recent thread in the Linux subreddit and the folks there did not pull any punches when sharing their thoughts about it.

  • PulseAudio 10.0 Linux Sound System Released, Offers OpenSSL 1.1.0 Compatibility

    Today, January 19, 2017, sees the official release of the PulseAudio 10.0 open-source sound server for Linux-based operating systems, a major version that introduces many exciting new features.

    PulseAudio 10.0 has been in development for the past seven months, since the June 22, 2016, release of PulseAudio 9.0, which is currently used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference

    The Mirai botnet? Just the “tip of the iceberg” is how security bods at this week's linux.conf.au see the Internet of Things.

    Presenting to the Security and Privacy miniconf at linux.conf.au, embedded systems developer and consultant Christopher Biggs pointed out that Mirai's focus on building a big DDoS cannon drew attention away from the other risks posed by insecure cameras and digital video recorders.

  • The Linux Foundation Brings 3 New Open Source Events to China

    LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen will be held in China this year for the first time, The Linux Foundation announced this week.

    After the success of other Linux Foundation events in the country, including MesosCon Asia and Cloud Foundry Summit Asia, The Linux Foundation decided to offer its flagship LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen events in China as well, said Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin.

    “Chinese developers and businesses have strongly embraced open source and are contributing significant amounts of code to a wide variety of projects,” Zemlin said. “We have heard the call to bring more open source events to China.”

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Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more