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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Modular, open source robotics kit lets you build your own 3D printer

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OSS

Plugg.ee Labs’s Cortex-M3 based “JuicyBoard” robotics kit is designed for building stepper motor controlled devices like 3D printers or CNC routers.

The JuicyBoard has surpassed its modest funding goals on Crowd Supply, providing a modular, open source development kit for stepper motor oriented devices such as 3D printers and CNC routers. Built around an NXP LPC1769 Cortex-M3 MCU, the kits are available starting at $179, with shipments due June 15.

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Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Final Beta Is Out with MATE 1.18, Drops 32-bit PowerPC Support

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is informing Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the Final Beta release of the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, due for release on April 13, 2017.

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Also: Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta Released

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?

    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance.

    In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."

  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide

    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.

  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos

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Software
HowTos

Security and Bugs

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Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software

    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.

  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors

    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw.

    Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors.

    And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.

BSD: iXsystems and DragonFlyBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • iXsystems Sees Record Growth in 2016, Charges Into 2017

    The FreeNAS Mini XL was also added, aimed at bringing enterprise-grade storage technology to the small office and home office user

  • VGA-Switcheroo Ported From Linux To DragonFlyBSD

    The latest DRM/graphics-related porting effort by François Tigeot in the DragonFly space is bringing over the vga_swticheroo module from the Linux kernel.

    François Tigeot continues doing a good job porting Linux DRM drivers over to DragonFlyBSD and getting them close to the state where they are with the mainline Linux Git tree. His latest effort is about getting VGA-Switcheroo working on DragonFly.

KDE/Qt: Qt 5.9.0 beta and Krita

Filed under
Development
KDE

GNOME and GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME ED Update – Week 12

    In case you haven’t seen it yet, there’s a new GNOME release – 3.24! The release is the result of 6 months’ work by the GNOME community.

  • GTK hackfest 2017: D-Bus communication with containers

    At the GTK hackfest in London (which accidentally became mostly a Flatpak hackfest) I've mainly been looking into how to make D-Bus work better for app container technologies like Flatpak and Snap.

  • GNOME 3.24 Linux Desktop Environment Released | Here Are The New Features

    The GNOME Project has released the latest stable version of their open source desktop environment. GNOME 3.24, codenamed Portland, is here after 6 months of development and 28459 changes. Some of the biggest features of GNOME 3.24 are Night Light, improved notifications, new Recipes and Games application, two GPU support, etc.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Microsoft Loves Microsoft

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Microsoft’s OneDrive performance on Linux is causing quite a storm

    Since Microsoft has been under the stewardship of Satya Nadella, the software giant has been embracing Linux in various different ways – ‘new Microsoft, new attitude’, as we observed a year ago – but not when it comes to OneDrive, it would seem.

    As the Register reports, there are a good number of users complaining about the poor performance of the OneDrive web app on their Linux machines (or other non-Windows platforms like Chromebooks).

    The interesting point here is that when using a Windows PC on the exact same connection with the OneDrive app, everything runs smooth and fast.

  • Microsoft loves Linux so much, its OneDrive web app runs like a dog on Windows OS rivals

    Ever since Satya Nadella took over the reins at Microsoft, the Windows giant has been talking up how much it loves Linux – but it appears this hasn't trickled down to its OneDrive team.

    Plenty of Linux users are up in arms about the performance of the OneDrive web app. They say that when accessing Microsoft's cloudy storage system in a browser on a non-Windows system – such as on Linux or ChromeOS – the service grinds to a barely usable crawl. But when they use a Windows machine on the same internet connection, speedy access resumes.

    Crucially, when they change their browser's user-agent string – a snippet of text the browser sends to websites describing itself – to Internet Explorer or Edge, magically their OneDrive access speeds up to normal on their non-Windows PCs.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Has More P-State Changes Coming For Linux 4.12

    Tuning the P-State CPU frequency scaling driver for the Linux kernel feels like a never-ending process. While it's been around for years and continues to be refined, for some Intel CPUs on some workloads, the CPUFreq scaling driver leads to be better performance and even Intel's own Clear Linux distribution is using CPUFreq by default. With Linux 4.12, more intel_pstate revisions are taking place.

  • Intel's Vulkan Driver Working On VK_KHX_multiview Support

    Intel's open-source "ANV" Vulkan Linux driver is prepping support for the experimental VK_KHX_multiview extension.

    Key Intel Vulkan driver contributor Jason Ekstrand has published his initial patches for VK_KHX_multiview support within the ANV code-base. This also includes SPIR-V support for the related SPV_KHR_multiview extension.

  • Mir's Abstraction Layer Now Has Cut & Paste Support (MirAL)

    A few days ago we reported on Ubuntu's Mir now supporting drag and drop while now another important desktop feature has come to Ubuntu's Mir abstraction layer, MirAL.

  • DRM Core Updates For HDMI 2.0+ Features

    Synopsys has been working on some DRM core infrastructure patches for better handling of HDMI 2.0+ support by DRM drivers.

Proprietary Software

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Software

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

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Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Next-gen developers need master class in open source, says IBM

    The demand for software applications with baked-in cognitive and data science technology is raising expectations of what a developer must bring to the table. Open-source Application Programming Interfaces lower the “concept count” needed, but composing them into next-gen apps will take practice, according to Angel Diaz (pictured), vice president of cloud architecture and technology at IBM.

    “The developer is becoming a cognitive developer and a data science developer in addition to an application developer, and that is the future,” Diaz said.

  • Dell Is Exploring The Use Of Coreboot, At Least Internally

    Dell appears to be using Coreboot on some of their modern Intel Atom motherboards paired with the Intel FSP and TianoCore.

  • How a small team keeps Twitter’s Fail Whale at bay

    Following the strong wake created by the Fail Whale, Twitter created a life raft in the form of stateless containerized micro services. In just a few years, they’ve scaled to hundreds of teams running thousands of services on tens of thousands of hosts and in hundreds of thousands of containers.

    Ian Downes is engineering manager for the compute platform team at Twitter. His team of about 10 engineers and a few other staffers buoys a platform providing container infrastructure to much of the stateless services powering twitter.com and its advertising business. Downes spoke recently at Container World on “Twitter’s Micro Services Architecture: Operational & Technical Challenges.”

  • Teradata Debuts Open Source Kylo™ to Quickly Build, Manage Data Pipelines
  • Teradata Scores Highest in All Use Cases in 2017 Gartner Report: Critical Capabilities for Data Management Solutions for Analytics
  • 5 Legal Risks For Companies Involved in Open Source Software Development

    The reasons that organizations use Open Source Software (OSS) are many and varied. It speeds development, lowers costs, provides flexibility, and facilitates innovation -- all of which add up to a competitive advantage for the organization.

    But there are also challenges and legal risks involved when companies shift from a development model based on custom, in-house development to one based on assembling open source components and coding only the parts that are truly unique to an application.

    In the previous post, we covered six operational challenges that organizations face using OSS.

    In this final post of our series, we’ll review the legal risks and the spectrum of open source licenses involved.

  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field. We’ve seen how, over the last several years, open source software—platforms like the Robot Operating System (ROS), Gazebo, and OpenCV, among others—has played a huge role in helping researchers and companies build robots better and faster. Can the same thing happen with robot hardware?

  • Thou shalt not depend on me: analysing the use of outdated JavaScript libraries on the web
  • Hello Debugger!

    I’m a huge fan of GDB and DDD, but for anything beyond basic breakpoints, I’ve found myself wading through too much user documentation. What if I want a consistent conditional breakpoint, even if I add or remove earlier code? Never mind setting an initial breakpoint, then adding a data-dependent watchpoint… already, the terminology is getting thick. There has to be a better way.

Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Final Beta Released with Linux Kernel 4.10, Mesa 17.0

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical released today, as expected, the Final Beta of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, due for release on April 13, 2017, along with the rest of the opt-in flavors, such as Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, etc.

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Embarcadero’s RAD Studio 10.2 released with Linux support

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Linux

Embarcadero wants to help developers build cross-platform native apps faster with the latest release of its RAD Studio. According to the company RAD Studio 10.2 is a milestone release with Linux support, improved IDE menus, new features, and enhanced C++ performance.

The latest version features its first LLVM-based Linux compiler for enterprise development. The Delphi Linux compiler is designed to help developers take new and existing Windows server apps and target Linux servers, according to the company. The Linux compiler features full file system support, threads and parallel programing library, and FireDAC database access support.

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Red Hat software-defined storage takes another step forward

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Red Hat

Do you need software-defined storage (SDS) for your enterprise virtualization, analytics, and enterprise sync and share workloads? If so, then Red Hat has the program for you: Red Hat Gluster Storage 3.2.

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Boards With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Latest Linux Maker Boards Gamble on Diversity

    As usual, last week’s Embedded World show in Nuremberg, Germany was primarily focused on commercial embedded single board computers (SBCs), computer-on-modules, and rugged industrial systems for the OEM market. Yet, we also saw a growing number of community-backed maker boards, which, like most of the commercial boards, run Linux. The new crop shows the growing diversity of hacker SBCs, which range from completely open source models to proprietary prototyping boards that nevertheless offer low prices and community services such as forums and open source Linux distributions.

  • Rugged, expandable 3.5-inch Skylake SBC supports Linux

    Diamond’s 3.5-inch “Venus” SBC offers an Intel 6th Gen CPU, -40 to 85°C support, up to 20GB of ruggedized RAM, and mini-PCIe and PCIe/104 OneBank.

  • How enthusiasts designed a powerful desktop PC with an ARM processor

    The purpose of the gathering was to get the ball rolling for the development of a real desktop based on ARM. The PC will likely be developed by 96boards, which provides specifications to build open-source development boards.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • [Video] Linux Audio Programs Compared 2017
    I made this video for those that are new to, or just interested in making music on the Linux OS. I go over the features, goods and bads of Rosegarden, LMMS, Ardour, Mixbus, and EnergyXT, as well as touch on Qtractor. I don't don't go much into details of the particular versions I am using, but the video was made in the early part of 2017 and I'm running Ubuntu 16.04LTS.
  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux
    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.
  • Komorebi: A New Way To Enhance Your Desktop Using Animated/Parallax Wallpapers
    In past there were applications that allowed us to run videos/Gif as wallpaper on the desktop and make desktop look much cooler but than all of sudden the development of such Apps stopped and I can't name any App that exist for this purpose. Komorebi is fairly new application designed to make your desktop experience much better and make desktop cool as well, we can say it is kind of 'live wallpaper' situation here or 3D wallpaper. It is developed by Abe Masri and available under GPL license for free.
  • Stacer Sytem Optimizer: A Must Have Application For Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are multiple ways to optimize your Linux, the most geeky way is using Terminal, there are also applications available that performs such actions like Bleachbit, Ubuntu cleaner and so on. Stacer is simple, open-source, quick and new application designed to offer you all-in-one optimizer for your Ubuntu/Linux Mint (It's alternative to CCleaner but only for Linux).
  • Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux
    Long years ago, we've talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.
  • Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More
    Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes. For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more. It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.
  • Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys
    Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser. The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.
  • Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA
    Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).
  • Terminix Terminal Emulator Renamed To Tilix, Sees New Bugfix Release
    [Quick update] Terminix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator, has been renamed to Tilix due to some trademark issues.

today's howtos

Games and CodeWeavers/Wine

  • A Snapshot of Linux Gamers, Just One Year Ago
    It’s about time we share the analysis of that Q1 2016 survey (fielding occured in March last year), especially as we are about to launch the Q1 2017 one pretty, pretty soon. That way we will be able to compare how things have changed over the course of 12 months. As usual, the whole disclaimer about online surveys is valid here (data is only as good as your n size, the appropriateness of your sampling, and the quality of the responses, etc…), but assuming it’s not all that bad and all that unreliable, let’s dig in the results. As a reminder, most of the respondents for this survey were recruited through the r/linux and r/linux_gaming subreddits, as well as the readership of BoilingSteam. This is not our first survey, and you can see our previous ones done in the second quarter of 2015, and the following one in the last quarter of 2015.
  • Slime-san Coming To PC, Mac and Linux
    Headup Games and Fabraz proudly announce their upcoming action-platformer Slime-san for PC, Mac and Linux via Steam & Humble Bundle. Console releases will follow soon after. Jump and slime your way through 100 levels in a unique 5-colored, pixelated world and escape from a giant worm’s innards. Get your shopping done in Slumptown, a town full of survivors within the worm. Unlock different play styles, outfits, shaders and even multiplayer mini-games! Slime-san is developed by Fabraz, an independent development studio that also released the critically-acclaimed games Cannon Crasha and Planet Diver. Slime-san was minding his own business, sliming around in a peaceful forest when suddenly…A giant worm appeared and gobbled him up! Now deep within the worm’s belly, Slime-san has to face a decision: Be digested by the incoming wall of stomach acid... Or jump, slide and slime his way through the worm's intestines and back out its mouth!
  • CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 16.2.0
  • The Wine Revolution is ON!
    As you know Codeweavers (and other WINE contributors) have been working on DX11 support for a while – they were supposed to have DX11 support by the end of 2016, but as with all complex projects, timelines tend to slip and only very DX11 titles could run a few months ago. Since then, there was no major announcement, but it seems that the progress has been very significant in the recent WINE versions (2.3 is already out).

Leftovers: KDE