Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 26 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 6:19pm
Story Samsung 980 PRO PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSD Linux Performance Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 6:08pm
Story Modberry 500 CM4 DIN Rail Industrial Computer Features Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Rianne Schestowitz 1 26/10/2020 - 6:04pm
Story My Open Source meltdown, and the rise of a star Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 5:52pm
Story What Linux needs to make it a better mobile desktop Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 5:45pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2020 - 4:56pm
Story It’s Official: Linux Kernel 5.10 Will Be an LTS Release Marius Nestor 26/10/2020 - 3:39pm
Story Ubuntu 21.04 Is Slated for Release on April 22, 2021 Marius Nestor 26/10/2020 - 3:01pm
Story Linus Torvalds Announces First Linux Kernel 5.10 Release Candidate Marius Nestor 26/10/2020 - 1:54pm
Story Games: Nonsense Soccer, Bound By Blades and Halloween at Humble Store Roy Schestowitz 1 26/10/2020 - 11:53am

Videos About GNU/Linux and Free Software

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Ubuntu 20.10 Full Installation Walkthrough - YouTube

    Ubuntu 20.10 was recently released, and in this video we explore the installation process. We'll go through the entire process of replacing your current operating system with the latest version of the Ubuntu desktop.

  • Ubuntu 20.10, System76’s Thelio Mega, CUPS Forked from Apple | This Week in Linux 122

    We’ve got a stacked episode this week, so coming up on This Week in Linux, we’re going to start things off with the latest release of Ubuntu 20.10 and the Ubuntu 20.10 Flavour releases. Then we’re going to jump into the ridiculous realm with a new product from System76 called the Thelio Mega. There’s been some big news in the Printing world of Linux related to CUPS. NVIDIA has announced that support for Linux 5.9 is not ready yet so we’ll talk about what that means and whether or not it will affect you. Later in the show we’re going to cover some more Distro News from Trisquel with their 9.0 release and SystemRescue 7.0 is another recovery distro to check out. Then we’ll round out the show with an update to the best web browser on the planet, with release of Firefox 82. All that and much more comming up right now on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • TAILS OS: Become Invisible On The Web With This Ultimate Privacy OS (REAL INCOGNITO!)

    Today, It's absolutely normal for websites to TRACK your every move on the internet. Your LOCATION, The WEBSITES You Visit, What you do on the internet is being WATCHED and STUDIED by Prying Eyes.

  • KDE Plasma 5.20 Released | Massive Update For 2020 (Revamped!)

    KDE Plasma 5.20 is out and we're seeing a number of huge design changes all over the desktop. This new release is a massive update, as it brings visual redesigns in some important components of the desktop as well as some crucial under the hood improvements.

  • Why would anyone use the Terminal? | Linux Literate

    If the audio is a little weird in this video, I apologize. I tried to fix it, but it randomly speeds up and slows down during the rendering process and I couldn't figure out what was wrong.

  • Mozilla defends Google's MONOPOLY (for money?)

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

  • How to Create Bootable USB Linux Media with usbimager - YouTube

    Now that Etcher seems a bit "shady", I've decided to recommend a different tool to create bootable Linux installation media: usbimager!

  • How To Install Steam on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Steam on CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Steam is a digital distribution platform for video games. As Amazon Kindle is a digital distribution platform for e-Books, iTunes for music, similarly Steam is for games. It provides you with the option to buy and install games, plays multiplayer, and stays in touch with other games via social networking on its platform. The games are protected with DRM. Recently, over 4500 games are available through Steam, and 125 million active users are registered with the Steam platform.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Steam on a CentOS 8.

  • pkgstats version 3: lookup package statistics from your terminal – Pierre Schmitz

    pkgstats is a tool that gathers and analyses installed packages of Arch Linux users. It started as a small shell script back in 2008 and helps us among other things to determine en-Source Intel Compute Stack packages are no longer used but also which packages from the AUR are popular candidates.

    Previously I rewrote the server part and added historical statistics per package and the ability to compare the popularity of several packages over time. It also introduced a public API which is now used by the pkgstats client.

Kodi 18.9 Released with HTTP Access Workaround [PPA]

Filed under
Software
Movies

Kodi media center released one more update for the 18.x “Leia” a day ago, with a quick workaround to the third-party HTTP2 and SSL changes that impacted internet access from Kodi by scrapers, streaming addons, etc.

Read more

Linux Weekly Roundup: Edge for Linux, Ubuntu Groovy Release, KDE Plasma 5.20.1 and more

Filed under
News

A lot happened this week in the Linux world as a whole. Microsoft Edge browser is released for Linux, Ubuntu 20.10 released with associated flavours and a bunch of application updates as well. Read the stories below.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

     
  • Russians Who Pose Election Threat Have Hacked Nuclear Plants and Power Grid

                     

                       

    Officials at San Francisco International Airport discovered Russia’s state [attackers] had breached the online system that airport employees and travelers used to gain access to the airport’s Wi-Fi. The [attackers] injected code into two Wi-Fi portals that stole visitors’ user names, cracked their passwords and infected their laptops.

  •                

  • Psychotherapy centre data breach victims receive extortion emails [iophk: Windows TCO

                     

                       

    ]As well as their personal data, the extortionist told them that records of their discussions with therapists would be published.

                       

    It is not known whether the extortionist is the same individual or group that [cracked] the data in the first place.

                       

    Individual emails were sent on Saturday evening, with [YLE] receiving messages from 8pm onwards. All the victims described receiving the same message.

    The extortionist wrote that recipients must pay 200 euros within 24 hours, or if they don't meet that deadline, 500 euros within 48 hours.

  • Datacamp Review - CodersLegacy

    Datacamp is a very well known online learning platform for programmers. It aims to teach a variety of different languages and topics through the use of videos, text and exercises.

    In this review we’ll be attempting to cover everything about Datacamp, from it’s format to it’s user complaints to it’s good points. Whether Datacamp is worth the time and money, will be clear to you by the end of this review.

  • Why I wrote 152 extra lines of code just to do the same thing (and why I’d do it again today)

    Who else remembers printing out code on a dot matrix printer? Ah, those were the days… (Image courtesy Arnold Reinhold.)

  • YottaDB Announces Octo 1.0, a YottaDB Plugin for Using SQL to Query Data in YottaDB

    YottaDB, the database for transactional systems where data integrity is paramount, today announced production-grade Octo 1.0, a YottaDB plugin to query YottaDB application data using popular SQL tools. YottaDB excels for transactional systems, where data integrity and application robustness are paramount – applications that effect database state change to provide mission-critical functionality, such as electronic health record systems, core banking systems, library systems, and election systems.

    There is a vast ecosystem of tools using SQL/JDBC for reporting, visualization, analysis, and more. Octo 1.0 makes databases of transactional applications that use YottaDB, accessible to those tools.

  • Introducing Octo

    Octo is a YottaDB plugin for using SQL to query data that is persisted in YottaDB’s key-value tuples (global variables).

    Conforming to YottaDB’s standard for plugins, Octo is installed in the $ydb_dist/plugin sub-directory with no impact on YottaDB or existing applications. In addition to YottaDB itself, Octo requires the YottaDB POSIX plugin. The popularity of SQL has produced a vast ecosystem of tools for reporting, visualization, analysis, and more. Octo opens the door to using these tools with the databases of transactional applications that use YottaDB.

  • About me and my life ...: Fedora 31 : Can be better? part 006.

    I try to use the Selinux MLS with Fedora 31 and I wrote on my last article about Fedora 31 : Can be better? part 005.After relabeling the files and start the environment I get multiple errors and I ask an answer at fedoraproject lists:This is an example of the problem of implementing MLS in Fedora and can be remedied because MLS Selinux is old in implementing Selinux.

  • How To Install HPLIP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install HPLIP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, HPLIP (HP Linux Imaging and Printing Driver) developed by HP for Printing, scanning, and faxing with HP inkjet and laser-based printers in Linux platforms.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of HP Linux Image and Printing on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Putting open values into management practice

    Allison has a unique perspective on the practice of managing with open values because she was familiar with working in an open organization before becoming a manager, and therefore needed to learn how to practice the values differently as she transitioned to a manager role at Red Hat. That was “easier said than done,” as she put it during our discussion, because of a manager's responsibilities for helping and coaching individuals on their team, specifically regarding performance and development.

    Allison manages a team focused on internal communications, where associates have a variety of unique responsibilities and work on different tasks rather than collaborate on a single deliverable. This makes both the sharing of knowledge and the use of knowledge toward an innovative goal of primary importance. Because of that, she feels she is not a "boss"—not someone who directs work— but rather "just another member of the team" who "sets the context in which works take place."

    She feels she is not a "boss"—not someone who directs work— but rather "just another member of the team" who "sets the context in which works take place."

  • Chrome OS finally has a dark mode, and you can try it right now

    While Windows and macOS users have been enjoying their flavors of dark mode for quite some time now, Chrome OS users have sadly been missing out on the fun. However, thanks to a recent sighting by Android Police on the Chrome OS Canary channel, it looks like Chrome OS users can now join in on the dark mode hype train.

    We reported back in September that Google has been internally working on proper dark and light themes for Chrome OS. The system-wide feature is still in its early development stages and is not officially ready to come to the Stable channel yet, but if you have a Chromebook and are itching to start using the upcoming feature today, you can do just that by going into the Flags menu on Chrome.

GNU Taler news: RFC 8905 - "The 'payto' URI Scheme for Payments" published

Filed under
GNU

We are happy to announce the publication of RFC 8905 by the IETF.

RFC 8905 defines the 'payto' Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) scheme for designating targets for payments. A unified URI scheme for all payment target types allows applications to offer user interactions with URIs that represent payment targets, simplifying the introduction of new payment systems and applications.

Read more

It's Time To Admit It: The X.Org Server Is Abandonware

The last major release of the X.Org Server was in May 2018 but don't expect the long-awaited X.Org Server 1.21 to actually be released anytime soon.

This should hardly be surprising but a prominent Intel open-source developer has conceded that the X.Org Server is pretty much "abandonware" with Wayland being the future. This comes as X.Org Server development hits a nearly two decade low, the X.Org Server is well off its six month release regiment in not seeing a major release in over two years, and no one is stepping up to manage the 1.21 release.

A year ago was a proposal to see new releases driven via continuous integration testing but even that didn't take flight and as we roll into 2021 there isn't any motivation for releasing new versions of the X.Org Server by those capable of doing so.

Read more

RISC OS 5.28 now available

Filed under
OS

Slightly delayed from our original target in Spring, we’re pleased to announce RISC OS 5.28 is now available for all platforms that met or exceeded our stable release criteria.

What’s inside?

The extra few months has allowed us to pack in a fantastic 366 improvements to the ‘HardDisc4’ image and applications, and a similarly impressive 344 improvements to the main operating system.

Enjoy an overhauled Paint, up-to-date network security, system wide clipboard support, all running faster thanks to our community led bounty schemes.

Read more

9 Best Free and Open Source Linux Archive Managers

Filed under
Software

A file archiver is computer software which brings together a group of files into a single archive file. An archive file is therefore a collection of files and directories that are stored in one file. There are many advantages of storing multiple files this way. For example, an archive is a great way to store backup data, transfer files to another directory, or to a different computer. Archive files are often compressed to save disk space and reduce transfer times.

This type of utility lets users compress, decompress, and archive files and directories. Most archivers also store additional metadata such as user and group permissions, timestamps, and directory structures. Other features often found in archive managers include support for multiple volumes, encryption, Unicode names, password protection, and integration into the shell.

The granddaddy of archive managers is the tar utility (together with the ar and cpio tools). Tar was created in the early days of Unix and remains an essential utility for any Linux system. The filename extension .tar is synonymous with file archives. Other types of archive formats include .iso (for optical storage mediums such as CDROM and DVD-ROMs), .shar, .cpio, and .ar.

Linux has a good range of open source archive managers, both console based (such as tar) or sporting an attractive graphical user interface and integrating with a desktop environment.

Here’s our recommendations. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone who wants to backup their data, create new archives, and decompress files downloaded from the internet.

Read more

Red Hat's Tom Stellard Now Serving As LLVM Release Manager

Filed under
Development
Red Hat

After six years serving as the LLVM release manager and taking over the role from LLVM founder Chris Lattner, Google's Hans Wennborg has stepped down from his position and handed it over to Red Hat's Tom Stellard.

Wennborg announced this week that after six years and twelve major LLVM releases, he is stepping down as LLVM release manager to devote the time to other activities.

Read more

Also: IBM Hopes to Double Sales at Red Hat in Next Three Years

Programming: RISC-V Dev Board, JS, Bash and More

Filed under
Development

  • BL602 IoT SDK and $5 DT-BL10 WiFi & BLE RISC-V development board

    Go to Doiting_BL/docs/html folder and then open index.html in your browser to access the documentation. The SDK works both in Windows and Linux and relies on either Eclipse & OpenOCD or Freedom Studio & OpenOCD. A graphical software called Dev Cube is used for flashing the board.

    The documentation is made for a specific board Doit.am DT-BL10 development board powered by BL602 WiSoC that sells for $5 plus shipping on Aliexpress or 19.99 RMB on Taobao (about $3). We’re not at ESP8266 board price level ($2+) yet, but still affordable and interesting for evaluation.

  • Javascript Redirect – Linux Hint

    Javascript is a web-oriented programming language. When using the web, you will often need to navigate through pages. When you click on any button, submit a form, or log in to any website, you get redirected to a different new page. Page redirection is an essential part of any website, but it is not only restricted to page navigation on a website. 

  • JavaScript Sleep Function – Linux Hint

    Javascript is the language of freedom yet is a function-oriented language at the same time. Unlike other languages, javascript does not provide a built-in sleep() function. You can either build a custom sleep() function using the built-in setTimeout() function, or the latest ECMAScript promises an async-await function. This article shows you how to stop or pause the execution of the sleep function for a desired amount of time using promises or async-await functions.

  • 3 Hour Bash Tutorial – Linux Hint

    In this article, you will learn from printing a simple “Hello World” to using conditional statements such as if statements, case statements to using loops such as while, for until loops to awk, grep, sed, and debugging bash scripts. We will cover the following topics in this article:

  •  

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: digest 0.6.27: Build fix

    Exactly one week after the previous release 0.6.26 of digest, a minor cleanup release 0.6.27 just arrived on CRAN and will go to Debian shortly.

    digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, and blake3 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a fairly widely-used package (currently listed at one million monthly downloads, 282 direct reverse dependencies and 8068 indirect reverse dependencies, or just under half of CRAN) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Manage Linux system resources in style with Bpytop

    Bpytop is an advanced, terminal-based control center for Linux. With it, users can view and manage their CPU usage, RAM/SWAP usage, network download/upload, and even terminate running programs!

  • What To Do After Installing Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla

    Below is list of useful tips and tricks for new Ubuntu 20.10. If you have purchased a new Ubuntu laptop or installed it by yourself to computer, this article is for you. This list has apps recommendation, fonts and wallpapers stuffs, amusement and also things for your health. Enjoy latest computing technology comfortably on Ubuntu!

  • Install Firefox on Raspberry Pi OS – Linux Hint

    Chromium is the default web browser of Raspberry Pi OS – the official operating system of Raspberry Pi. Chromium is the open-source version of the popular Google Chrome web browser. Chromium performs really well on the Raspberry Pi. But many people like the Firefox web browser. If you’re one of them, you have come to the right place.

    [...]

    In this article, I have shown you how to install the Firefox web browser on your Raspberry Pi OS. I have also shown you how to set the Firefox web browser as the default web browser of Raspberry Pi OS.

  • How to use PHP through command-line – Linux Hint

    PHP is mainly used to develop web applications, but it can also be used for other purposes. One of the useful features of PHP is the support of SAPI (Server Application Programming Interface) type named CLI (Command Line Interface). The CLI SAPI is released in PHP 4.2.0 version for the first time. The –enable-cli option is used to enable this feature, and this option is enabled in the new version of PHP by default. Furthermore, the –disable-cli option is used to disable this feature.

  • Install Oracle Virtualbox 6.1.16 in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS / Linux Mint | askmetutorials

    This tutorial shows how you can install Oracle Virtualbox 6.1.16 On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Linux Mint 20.

    Virtualbox is an Open source application for running operating systems virtually in your base system, with this application, you can create and run multiple Operating systems virtually on your PC.

Distro Flashback: What happened to Cub Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The operating system wasn’t always known as Cub Linux. In actuality, when it first got announced back in 2014, Chromixium OS was what it was called. After a year of its announcement, its first stable version hit the open-source world as a 32-bit live ISO.

With that being said, this release didn’t go as smoothly as planned. There were several bugs reported by its users, which included slow menu generation and screen tearing. On the bright side, the developers soon got to solving these issues and released a service pack in addition to various updates. However, what really took Chromixium OS to the next level was the release of its 64-bit version in November 2015.

All of this development hit a roadblock when the owner of Chromium and Chrome OS, Google, sent a request to the operating system’s developers to give up the name ‘Chromixium’ and other related social media presences websites. However, that couldn’t stop the head of this project, RichJack, as they soon addressed this issue and renamed their OS as Cub Linux. These events took place in late 2015 and ended on a positive note, but the project didn’t know what was approaching its way in 2016.

When 2016 was nearing its end, Cub Linux users started noticing one big thing: the official website had been missing. This turned out to indicate the demise of a project that could have done wonders in the future. Even though their GitHub page is open to this very day, the development had stopped, and there was no point in keeping up with Cub Linux anymore. According to a developer, this project’s sudden end could be attributed to “private life restrictions,” which is as vague as a statement could get.

With that being said, as far as the future of Cub Linux is concerned, many other developers got interested in this project and wanted to pick it up. Accordingly, the Feren OS developer announced in 2017 that he would give Cub Linux a major overhaul and “bring back Cub” with the name of Phoenix Linux. This might seem like good news to some, but honestly, the future of Phoenix Linux doesn’t seem too bright since the project hasn’t received another update since March 2018. If we’re really hopeful, we’ll get something as soon as 2021, but waiting any longer wouldn’t make much sense.

Read more

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

  • Only Python: Friendly-traceback: work in progress

    It's been almost two months since my last blog post and I feel guilty of not haven't taken the time to write more regularly.  I should really tell you about how fantastic Will McGugan's Rich is, and how I have customized it for my projects. I should also tell you how Sylvain Desodt's DidYouMeanPython has been influencing Friendly-traceback latest developments. Also worthy of note is how Alex Hall's FutureCoder project is incorporating so many neat tools that it feels like a real honour that he has incorporated Friendly-traceback in it.

    Alas, while I have been busy making many changes and addition to the code, the documentation is hopelessly behind and no longer gives a correct picture of what Future-traceback is now capable of.

    So much to do, so little time. So, I will just end with a picture, and go back to coding, with a promise of writing more ... soon I hope.

  • Python range() Function – Linux Hint

    Python is a modern, general-purpose, and high-level programming language that comes with powerful features. Python has many built-in modules to support diverse operations. The range() function is a built-in function used to perform specific tasks or actions for a definite number of times. In other words, the range() function is used to perform a task iteratively. This function is used in conjunction with the for loop and the while loop.

  • Python Dictionaries – Linux Hint

    Python is an efficient and versatile programming language. It is one of the most frequently used high-level programming languages to perform data-related tasks due to its many supportive built-in modules and functions. To mention some of its many built-in data structures, it has arrays, lists, tuples, etc.

    Dictionaries are one of the built-in data structures in Python. It holds the data in the form of a key-value pair. The keys are the unique value that acts as a representative of data. The key is also called as “an index value”. Data structures are a very important aspect of any programming language. They are used to store and manipulate the data in a well-organized and efficient way. Therefore, Python dictionaries are more useful when we need to store the data in a form of key-value pair and to access the data faster. The Python dictionaries return the data faster because the key value for every data is unique, therefore the searching time for data is reduced, and we get the result faster. This article explicates the Python dictionaries in detail.

  • Python Classes – Linux Hint

    Python is one of the multiuse high-level programming languages. It is an object-oriented programming language. The main difference between the procedural and object-oriented programming languages is that we cannot create the classes in procedural programming languages. The main focus of procedural languages is on creating functions, and variables for performing the task whereas, in object-oriented programming languages, our main concern is to create objects and use them for performing our tasks. A class is simply a blueprint that contains functions and variables. A class is like a real-life classroom of any institute. It contains some chairs, tables, desks, a projector, walls, etc. base on all these components; we build a classroom. All these components are the variables and functions in a class, and a classroom is an object. The Python classes and objects are explained in this article.

  • FreeBSD process environ and resource limits

    New psutil 5.7.3 is out. This release adds support for 2 functionalities which were not available on BSD platforms: the ability to get the process environment (all BSD) and to get or set process resource limits (FreeBSD only), similarly to what can be done on Linux.

     

Kernel: KVM, Btrfs and nosymfollow

Filed under
Linux

Japanese IME on PCLinuxOS 64 KDE5 Magnum 2020 1015

Filed under
PCLOS

I recently saw that my install of PCLinuxOS was behaving funny after and update: the effects ceased working and web pages were loading slowly.

Last time this happened to me, I had to install a new iso because I had been working with a very old one.

This time, however, I had kept up with all the updates thanks to the convenient Simple Update Notifier, but something was not good.

Anyway, I decided to install the new PCLinuxOS 64 KDE5 Magnum 2020 1015. The installation went well, but I was worried because I normally install the PCLinuxOS GRUB2 on the distro partition, not on the MBR, but it was not possible for me to do it this time, so I was predicting a mess trying to boot OpenMandriva, Mageia, MX Linux, and Elive.

Read more

Microsoft Disables GitHub Repository of Open Source Project youtube-dl

Filed under
News

Recording Industry Association of America, Inc. (RIAA) sent a notice to GitHub for hosting youtube-dl source code. Microsoft’s GitHub took immediate action to disable the repositories. But was it the right thing to do?
Read more

Announcing the new Ubuntu Community Council

Filed under
Ubuntu

Thanks to all the Ubuntu Members that voted in the election, I am proud to announce our new Ubuntu Community Council!

The full results of the election can be seen here but our winners are:

Walter Lapchynski
Lina Elizabeth Porras Santana
Thomas Ward
José Antonio Rey
Nathan Haines
Torsten Franz
Erich Eichmeyer

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • If DT Made His Own OS, Things Would Be Radically Different!

    I often get asked by viewers, "If you made an OS, what would it look like?" I will never make my own OS or my own Linux spin, because I'm not interested in being a support channel for people, nor do I have the time.

  • Daniel Stenberg (Curl): A server transition

    The main physical server (we call it giant) we’ve been using at Haxx for a very long time to host sites and services for 20+ domains and even more mailing lists. The machine – a physical one – has been colocated in an ISP server room for over a decade and has served us very well. It has started to show its age.

    Some of the more known sites and services it hosts are perhaps curl, c-ares, libssh2 and this blog (my entire daniel.haxx.se site). Some of these services are however primarily accessed via fronting CDN servers.

    giant is a physical Dell PowerEdge 1850 server from 2005, which has undergone upgrades of CPU, disks and memory through the years.

    giant featured an Intel X3440 Xeon CPU at 2.53GHz with 8GB of ram when decommissioned.

  • On our Abusive Relationship with Mozilla’s Firefox

    One reaction to this problem has been to urge people to keep using, or switch to Mozilla Firefox. The reasoning is that only Firefox continues developing and maintaining an independent, functioning browser engine, with an independent code base. This should ensure that no single entity can turn into a monopoly, and dictate what web standards should be.

    Until recently, I have also held this line. I used Firefox, not only for my own sake, but for the sake of the web. But this stance has been becoming more and more burdensome. I ask myself, are they actually representing and defending who I want to imagine that they are?

    The more I think of it, the more the way Mozilla related to its users reminds me of emotional abuse.

  • Linux Foundation Newsletter: October 2020 [Ed: The ‘Linux’ Foundation has just sent another newsletter from its Windows server]
  • Why Open Access Is Necessary for Makers

    This is an Open Access Week guest post by Jordan Bunker, prototype engineer and open access advocate.

    After the world went into lockdown for COVID-19, Makers were suddenly confined to their workshops. Rather than idly wait it out, many of them decided to put their tools and skills to use, developing low-cost, rapid production methods for much-needed PPE and DIY ventilators in an effort to address the worldwide shortage.

    EFF is proud to celebrate Open Access Week.

  • Formative assessment in the computer science classroom
  • BL602/BL604 RISC-V WiFi & Bluetooth 5.0 LE SoC will sell at ESP8266 price point

    Hisilicon Hi3861 may be the first RISC-V WIFI SoC we’ve reported on, but due to political uncertainties and security concerns, supplies may not be available outside of China.

    So alternatives are welcomed, and Nanjing-based Bouffalo Lab (not a typo, 博流智能科技 in Chinese) has recently introduced BL602 and BL604 32-bit RISC-V WiFi and Bluetooth LE SoC for low-power IoT applications that are supposed to compete against ESP8266 in terms of price but with higher performance and additional features. The BL602 will also be integrated into an upcoming Sipeed Longan-series board, and potentially a new IoT board from Pine64.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

     

  • RcppSpdlog 0.0.3: New features and much more docs

    A good month after the initial two releases, we are thrilled to announce relase 0.0.3 of RcppSpdlog. This brings us release 1.8.1 of spdlog as well as a few local changes (more below).

    RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovic.

    This version of RcppSpdlog brings a new top-level function setLogLevel to control what events get logged, updates the main example to show this and to also make the R-aware logger the default logger, and adds both an extended vignette showing several key features and a new (external) package documentation site.

  •  

  • Hacktoberfest Mauritius 2020

    Saamiyah pinged me a few days ago about the Hacktoberfest event that she was organising and asked whether I would be free to present a topic. Sure, why not?

    As many tech meetups at the moment, the Hacktoberfest event also was virtual. It was hosted on the Jitsi instance of the Mauritius Software Craftsmanship Community. The event was scheduled to start at 19h30 on Friday, i.e last evening. I was late to join but "luckily" so was everybody.

  •                

  • Meet the 24-year-old who’s tracking every broken McDonald’s ice-cream machine in the US

                     

                       

    It turned out to be harder than he’d thought. Initially, he created an API that attempted to add a McSundae from every McDonald’s location to its cart once every minute. The app figured out what he was up to and blocked him — “It was like, you can’t do this, you look like a bot,” he recalled.

                       

    After a night of trial and error, Zahid figured out the magic time frame. Now, his bot attempts to add a McSundae every 30 minutes. If the bot successfully adds the item, it lets McBroken know that the location’s machine is working. If it can’t, the location gets a red dot. (A Twitter user claiming to be a McDonald’s employee has confirmed that the method works.)

  • Robbi Nespu: Fedora - KDE development journey (Qt5X11Extras)
  • Robbi Nespu: Fedora - KDE development journey (Qt5UiPlugin)
  • Perl Weekly Challenge 83: Words Length and Flip Array

    These are some answers to the Week 83 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar.

  • Four Features That Justify a New Unix Shell

    This post elaborates on these points. I've condensed the rationale into four critical features for the OSH language.

    I give examples of each feature, link to docs (in progress), and comment on the future of the project.

  • Node.js 15.0 Is Released - LinuxReviews

    Support for the QUIC protocol, a new AbortController class, a updated N-API with new methods for managing ArrayBuffers, V8 updated to version 8.6 and NPM updated to version 7.0 are among the highlights in the latest Node.js framework for creating JavaScript-based network services like web servers, chat servers and all kinds of real-time applications.

    [...]

    Node.js 15.0 is a "regular" support release with support throughout June 2021. Node.js uses even numbers for LTS releases. The Node.js 14.x branch is the corrent "Long Term Support" branch with support throughout April 2023 and the older Node.js 12.x will be supported until April 2022. The 10.x branch will go EOL in April 2021.

  • The 20 Best Java Courses for Beginners and Experienced Programmers

    When it comes to creating computer applications that can also be run in a network among distributed servers and clients, Java is still the most powerful programming language available. You can also build a small scale application module commonly known as an applet with Java.

  • OpenJ9 0.23 Released As Latest Eclipse Java Virtual Machine

    Version 0.23 of the Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine was released this week in continuing to focus on being a high performance, open-source JVM.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leaving Mozilla and Recalling One's Job in Mozilla

  • yoric.steps.next()

    The web is getting darker. It is being weaponized by trolls, bullies and bad actors and, as we’ve witnessed, this can have extremely grave consequences for individuals, groups, sometimes entire countries. So far, most of the counter-measures proposed by either governments or private actors are even scarier. The creators of the Matrix protocol have recently published the most promising plan I have seen. One that I believe stands a chance of making real headway in this fight, while respecting openness, decentralization, open-source and privacy. I have been offered the opportunity to work on this plan. For this reason, after 9 years as an employee at Mozilla, I’ll be moving to Element, where I’ll try and contribute to making the web a better place. My last day at Mozilla will be October 30th.

  • Working open source | daniel.haxx.se

    I work full time on open source and this is how. Background I started learning how to program in my teens, well over thirty years ago and I’ve worked as a software engineer and developer since the early 1990s. My first employment as a developer was in 1993. I’ve since worked for and with lots of companies and I’ve worked on a huge amount of (proprietary) software products and devices over many years. Meaning: I certainly didn’t start my life open source. I had to earn it. When I was 20 years old I did my (then mandatory) military service in Sweden. After having endured that, I applied to the university while at the same time I was offered a job at IBM. I hesitated, but took the job. I figured I could always go to university later – but life took other turns and I never did. I didn’t do a single day of university. I haven’t regretted it. [...]    I’d like to emphasize that I worked as a contract and consultant developer for many years (over 20!), primarily on proprietary software and custom solutions, before I managed to land myself a position where I could primarily write open source as part of my job. [...] My work setup with Mozilla made it possible for me to spend even more time on curl, apart from the (still going) two daily spare time hours. Nobody at Mozilla cared much about (my work with) curl and no one there even asked me about it. I worked on Firefox for a living. For anyone wanting to do open source as part of their work, getting a job at a company that already does a lot of open source is probably the best path forward. Even if that might not be easy either, and it might also mean that you would have to accept working on some open source projects that you might not yourself be completely sold on. In late 2018 I quit Mozilla, in part because I wanted to try to work with curl “for real” (and part other reasons that I’ll leave out here). curl was then already over twenty years old and was used more than ever before.

Programming: Buzzwords, Meson, Tracealyzer, LLVM, Python and Rust

  • What is DevSecOps? Everything You Need To Know About DevSecOps

    Most people are familiar with the term “DevOps,” but they don’t know how to really utilize it. There’s more to DevOps than just development and operational teams. There’s an essential element of DevOps that is often missing from the equation; IT security. Security should be included in the lifecycle of apps.  The reason you need to include security is that security was once assigned to one team that integrated security near the end-stages of development. Taking such a lax approach to security wasn’t such a problem when apps were developed in months or years. The average development cycle has changed quite a bit, though, and apps can be developed in a matter of days or weeks. Outdated security practices like leaving security too late can bring DevOps initiatives to their knees. 

  •   
  • Nibble Stew: The Meson Manual: Good News, Bad News and Good News

    Starting with good news, the Meson Manual has been updated to a third edition. In addition to the usual set of typo fixes, there is an entirely new chapter on converting projects from an existing build system to Meson. Not only are there tips and tricks on each part of the conversion, there is even guidance on how to get it done on projects that are too big to be converted in one go.

  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

    Percepio announced the availability of Tracealyzer version 4.4 with support for embedded Linux. Tracealyzer gives developers insight during software debugging and verification at the system level by enabling visual exploratory analysis from the top down. This makes the software suitable for spotting issues during full system testing and drill down into the details to find the cause. Version 4.4 adds several views optimized for Linux tracing, in addition to a set of visualizations already in Tracealyzer, and leverages Common Trace Format (CTF) and the widely supported LTTng, an open source tracing framework.

  •   
  • LLVM Adds A SPIR-V CPU Runner For Handling GPU Kernels On The CPU - Phoronix

    LLVM has merged an experimental MLIR-based SPIR-V CPU runner that the developers are working towards being able to handle CPU-based execution of GPU kernels.  This new SPIR-V runner is built around the MLIR intermediate representation (Multi-Level Intermediate Representation) with a focus of going from GPU-focused code translated through SPIR-V and to LLVM and then executed on the CPU. The runner focus is similar to that of the MLIR-based runners for NVIDIA CUDA, AMD ROCm, and Vulkan, but just executing on the CPU itself. It was earlier this year LLVM added the MLIR-Vulkan-Runner for handling MLIR on Vulkan hardware. 

  • Python Modulo in Practice: How to Use the % Operator – Real Python

    Python supports a wide range of arithmetic operators that you can use when working with numbers in your code. One of these operators is the modulo operator (%), which returns the remainder of dividing two numbers.

  • Test & Code : Python Testing for Software Engineering 136: Wearable Technology - Sophy Wong

    Wearable technology is not just smart consumer devices like watches and activity trackers. Wearable tech also includes one off projects by designers, makers, and hackers and there are more and more people producing tutorials on how to get started. Wearable tech is also a great way to get both kids and adults excited about coding, electronics, and in general, engineering skills. Sophy Wong is a designer who makes really cool stuff using code, technology, costuming, soldering, and even jewelry techniques to get tech onto the human body.

  • Librsvg's test suite is now in Rust

    Some days ago, Dunja Lalic rewrote the continuous integration scripts to be much faster. A complete pipeline used to take about 90 minutes to run, now it takes about 15 minutes on average. [...] The most complicated thing to port was the reference tests. These are the most important ones; each test loads an SVG document, renders it, and compares the result to a reference PNG image. There are some complications in the tests; they have to create a special configuration for Fontconfig and Pango, so as to have reproducible font rendering. The pango-rs bindings do not cover this part of Pango, so we had to do some things by hand.

ARM32 in Linux and Open Source Hardware Certification

  • ARM32 Page Tables

    As I continue to describe in different postings how the ARM32 start-up sequence works, it becomes necessary to explain in-depth the basic kernel concepts around page tables and how it is implemented on ARM32 platforms. To understand the paging setup, we need to repeat and extend some Linux paging lingo. Some good background is to read Mel Gormans description of the Linux page tables from his book “Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager”. This book was published in 2007 and is based on Mel’s PhD thesis from 2003. Some stuff has happened in the 13 years since then, but the basics still hold. It is necessary to also understand the new layers in the page tables such as the five layers of page tables currently used in the Linux kernel. First a primer: the ARM32 architecture with a classic MMU has 2 levels of page tables and the more recent LPAE (Large Physical Address Extension) MMU has 3 levels of page tables. Only some of the ARMv7 architectures have LPAE, and it is only conditionally enabled, i.e. the machines can also use the classic MMU if they want, they have both. It is not enabled by default on the multi_v7 configuration: your machine has to explicitly turn it on during compilation. The layout is so different that the same binary image can never support both classic and LPAE MMU in the same kernel image.

  • Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API – Open Source Hardware Association

    Today we are excited to announce the launch of a read/write API for our Open Source Hardware Certification program. This API will make it easier to apply for certification directly from where you already document your hardware, as well as empower research, visualizations, and explorations of currently certified hardware. OSHWA’s Open Source Hardware Certification program has long been an easy way for creators and users alike to identify hardware that complies with the community definition of open source hardware. Since its creation in 2016, this free program has certified hardware from over 45 countries on every continent except Antarctica. Whenever you see the certification logo on hardware:

LibreOffice: Presentation Size Decreasing and New Presentations About LibreOffice