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Sunday, 24 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Elive 2.7.1 beta released Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 9:29am
Story How To Setup Linux Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Computer [Part - 2] Mohd Sohail 24/07/2016 - 9:09am
Story 15 top Android smartphones we reviewed recently Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 4:57am
Story Ubuntu tablet and smartphone: a personal "mini" review Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 1:41am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:03am
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:03am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:03am
Story Emulation or WINE Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:01am
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2016 - 12:00am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 23/07/2016 - 11:59pm

Wine 1.9.15

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • As a blockchain-based project teeters, questions about the technology’s security

    There’s no shortage of futurists, industry analysts, entrepreneurs and IT columnists who in the past year have churned out reports, articles and books touting blockchain-based ledgers as the next technology that will run the world.

  • Fix Bugs, Go Fast, and Update: 3 Approaches to Container Security

    Containers are becoming the central piece of the future of IT. Linux has had containers for ages, but they are still maturing as a technology to be used in production or mission-critical enterprise scenarios. With that, security is becoming a central theme around containers. There are many proposed solutions to the problem, including identifying exactly what technology is in place, fixing known bugs, restricting change, and generally implementing sound security policies. This article looks at these issues and how organizations can adapt their approach to security to keep pace with the rapid evolution of containers.

  • Preventing the next Heartbleed and making FOSS more secure [Ed: Preventing the next Microsoft-connected trademarked bug for FOSS and making FOSS more secure from Microsoft FUD]

    David Wheeler is a long-time leader in advising and working with the U.S. government on issues related to open source software. His personal webpage is a frequently cited source on open standards, open source software, and computer security. David is leading a new project, the CII Best Practices Badging project, which is part of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) for strengthening the security of open source software. In this interview he talks about what it means for both government and other users.

Ubuntu Forums Hacked! Here Is What Hacker Stole?

Filed under
Linux
News

The forums of the most popular Linux distributions, Ubuntu, was hacked. The news was reported yesterday by Jane Silber on Ubuntu insights. Although he has confirmed that not any password was hacked in the plain text, rather hashed and salted strings which are of no use for the hacker. But, the hacker successfully downloaded other users' information.

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Intro to LimeSurvey: An open source, feature-rich polling platform

Filed under
OSS

LimeSurvey is released under the GPL, and a number of companies provide commercial hosting and support, so you can use it without having to set it up on a system of your own. LimeSurvey's installation instructions are clear and easy, and the list of dependencies is not strenuous—MySQL or PostgreSQL, PHP 5.5 or higher, and a web server of your choice. There is a short list of PHP modules that are needed, all of which are easily installable via your package mananger.

Read more

How I use Linux for theoretical physics

Filed under
Linux

In 2008, I started studying physics and got in contact with Linux, since a bunch of people used it for data analysis and simulations. Comprehension came fast and easy with such people around, and I was strongly encouraged to get things done with Linux. I installed Ubuntu on my notebook, and soon got familiar with Bash and the standard tools.

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Hands-On: Updating Fedora 23 to 24 via Gnome Software

Filed under
HowTos

It feels like it has been even more than a month since the release of Fedora 24 was announced. I have already installed the new release from scratch on most of my laptops, but I specifically held back my Acer Aspire Z3 all-in-one desktop system so that I could try out the promised upgrade using the Gnome Software utility.

I have been checking the Software utility periodically, and I finally saw the notice today that an update for Gnome 3.20 was available which would make it possible to upgrade to Fedora 24.

Read more

Keeweb A Linux Password Manager

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Security

Today we are depending on more and more online services. Each online service we sign up for, let us set a password and this way we have to remember hundreds of passwords. In this case, it is easy for anyone to forget passwords. In this article I am going to talk about Keeweb, a Linux password manager that can store all your passwords securely either online or offline.

Read<br />
more

​Nextcloud 10 beta includes two-factor authentication security

Filed under
OSS

For a company that's only been around for a couple of months, Nextcloud isn't wasting any time making improvements. Frank Karlitschek, Nextcloud's managing director, just announced the release of the Nextlcloud 10 beta.

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Ubuntu 16.04 Updated, Remembering Mandriva, Leap 42.2a3 Report

Filed under
-s

Canonical announced an update to their Ubuntu 16.04 Long Term Support Linux system. Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS brings many updates, bug fixes, and security patches as well as Snap app support. In other news, Christopher Tozzi is back again today with a look back at Mandriva Linux and Neil Rickert test drove openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 3 released yesterday. Elsewhere, after all the hubbub over Linux Skype Alpha, Microsoft has announced it will discontinue the application soon.

Read more

Opensuse Leap 42.2 alpha3

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

I saw the announcement yesterday, so I downloaded and installed alpha3. I’ll note that I skipped alpha2, because it was mainly for testing Gnome and I’m don’t much use Gnome (though I do install it).

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Games: Stardew Valley and Life is Strange

Filed under
Gaming

10 Best Open Source Collaboration Software Tools

Filed under
OSS

As the workforce becomes more mobile and employers look for ways to improve productivity, collaboration software become increasingly popular. According to a June 2016 study from Markets and Markets, organizations will spend $23.39 billion on cloud-based collaboration software tools this year. By 2021, the analysts expect the market to grow to $42.57 billion, for a compound annual growth rate of 12.7 percent.

Collaboration software offer small businesses a wide variety of benefits. They can increase teamwork and communication, particularly if people on your team work in different locations. They can also help you share knowledge more widely throughout the organization and lessen the chance that employees will waste time duplicating the same work. They can also streamline your business processes and reduce the need for face-to-face meetings—both of which can decrease costs.

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Mandriva Linux: A Look Back at the Late, Great Open Source OS

Filed under
MDV

Remember Mandriva Linux? Once among the most popular Linux-based open source operating systems, it disappeared last year, along with Mandriva, Inc., the company that owned it. Belatedly, here's a retrospective look at late, great Mandriva Linux.

I was reminded of Mandriva recently while updating The VAR Guy's Open Source 50 list. As the list shows, in 2012 The VAR Guy (who is not me, by the way) expressed doubts about Mandriva's future. He turned out to be right. (When is he not?) In May 2015 Mandriva Inc. ceased operating and its GNU/Linux distribution disappeared.

But the open source OS's inglorious and little-reported demise belied the importance it once held within the open source ecosystem. Born in 1998 as a Red Hat-based GNU/Linux distribution originally known as Mandrake, Mandriva stood out from the pack by offering one of the first truly user-friendly open source operating systems.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • FLOSS Weekly 397: CoreOS Update
  • SJVN Talks FOSS, Linux, Microsoft & More…

    The official Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols LinkedIn page says, “I’ve written over 9,000 articles on business and technology subjects. Highlights include the first popular news story about the web and the first Linux benchmarks. My articles range from features to reviews to OpEd to news reporting.”

    A large percentage of those articles have been about Linux and FOSS, so it was logical for us to ring up SJVN (as he is commonly known) and ask him what’s the biggest news about FOSS so far in 2016, and what we can expect in the rest of the year.

  • GSoC Update: Tinkering with KIO

    Secondly, the ioslave is now completely independent from Dolphin, or any KIO application for that matter. This means it works exactly the same way across the entire suite of KIO apps. Given that at one point we were planning to make the ioslave fully functional only with Dolphin, this is a major plus point for the project.

  • Linux Top 3: Network Security Toolkit, Untangle NG Firewall and IPFire

    There is no shortage of Linux distributions that provide a platform for security researcher to conduct various security research. Among them is the Network Security Toolkit (NST), which was recently updated to version 24-7977. The 24 is a referenced to Fedora, which NST is based on.

    Aside from simply integrating existing tools, NST goes a step further and provides a number of innovative capabilities including a new Multi-Traceroute (MTR) networking tool.

  • Tally ERP 9 on Linux

    Recently we implemented Tally ERP 9 solution for Antico Pumps. That itself is not interesting, the interesting part is they are using LTSP Fat client system on openSUSE. They have only one server from which all their client computers boot over the network, the clients do not have hard disk, client OS with all softwares they need including wine(Tally is Windows only software), as well as users’ data resides on the server. Once the client boots all the local resources are used so single low power server can be used to serve many clients.

  • Onion brings Omega2: a $5 Linux powered IoT board
  • $5 Omega2 Linux Mini PC Designed For The Internet Of Things And More (video)

    Electronics enthusiasts looking for a small Linux powered mini PC for Internet of Things projects might be interested in the new Omega2 which has been created by Onion and is priced at just $5.

  • Zipt free voice calling app selected as Marquee app for Tizen

    Popular international communication app Zipt developed by ZipTel Ltd has been called up by Samsung to be the Marquee app for Tizen. With the launch of the next Tizen based smartphones happening possibly as early as next month, Samsung might be gearing up for a major announcement for the Tizen platform which until now has been deficient of apps that are easily available on rival platforms like Android and iOS. The Zipt negotiation could possibly be a part of this announcement. Ziptel are now working with the finest of Tizen Developers to get their app into the Tizen platform.

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Why and How to Use Ring Instead of Skype on Linux

    It is like when you say Ring is an alternative to Skype. No, no, it's not. Skype is ghastly. It is proprietary; it is demonstrably insecure; there is evidence that Microsoft uses Skype to siphon off conversations to the NSA; and the GNU/Linux version still lags behind the Windows one. So no, Ring is not an alternative to Skype. Ring is a full-featured, open source product that you need to know about.

  • In Search of a Linux iTunes Replacement

    If I’m to pick a favorite from just these three, I suppose it’s going to be Clementine. Sure, it might be a bit more resource intensive than the other choices and a little broken in places, but I still prefer it to what iTunes has become. As far as the differences between trying new software in a Windows versus a Linux environment, I’m not going to lie: finding my way around Linux is taking some getting used to. And that’s okay — I expected as much. Just as I’d expect trying to haggle in Portuguese might be a bit rough at first if I’m just learning the language and I’ve only known English until now.

  • 5 tricks for getting started with Vim
  • Vim or Emacs: Which text editor do you prefer?
  • Opera Developer Update Lands RSS Reader, Chromecast Capability

    For those still using the cross-platform Opera web browser, a new developer build is available today that provides new features.

    New to the Opera 40.0.2296.0 developer update that was released today is a built-in RSS reader. Opera admits this initial RSS reader is "pretty rough on the edges" but great to see them finally supporting it with their latest browser.

  • Opera developer 40.0.2296.0 update

    As we approach midsummer in this area, we would like to offer a developer update which includes one feature that was frequently asked for. You may now realize it is…

  • Kentucky Route Zero Act IV now Available

    The newest installment in the episodic adventure game Kentucky Route Zero has been released after a two year wait.

  • Overlord and Overlord: Raising Hell released for Linux, some thoughts and a port report

    Overlord and the Overlord: Raising Hell expansion have been ported to Linux thanks to Virtual Programming. I was able to get advanced access yesterday and here are some thoughts.

    Note: The Linux release is not yet on Steam. This is a DRM free release from their own store. It's using MojoSetup, so you can install it wherever you please.

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • Writing an ebook about usability?

    I write more about this on my Coaching Buttons blog, that I'm thinking about writing an ebook. Actually, it's several ebooks. But the one that applies here is Open Source Usability.

  • GNOME Mutter 3.21.4 Released WIth New Screen Capture API, NVIDIA vRAM Robustness

    Various GNOME software components were checked in today in preparation for this week's GNOME 3.21.4 development release.

    When it comes to the Mutter 3.21.4 compositor / window manager release, there are a few new features on top of fixes. This 3.21.4 release includes the frame-buffer / display work I talked about this morning that should allow multiple monitor setups to have different DPIs, among other design improvements. There is also improved X11 to/from Wayland copy/paste interaction, support for the NV_robustness_video_memory_purge extension, a screen capture API has been added to Mutter itself, and various other fixes/improvements.

  • Mutter 3.21.4

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reproducible builds: week 62 in Stretch cycle
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Released
  • Howdy, Ubuntu on Windows! An Intro From Canonical's Dustin Kirkland

    Hi there! My name is Dustin Kirkland, a Linux user for nearly 20 years, and an open source developer for almost as long. I worked on Linux at IBM for most of a decade, on site at Red Hat for a bit, and now at Canonical for nearly another decade. I started at Canonical as an engineer on the Ubuntu Server team and eventually evolved into the product manager responsible for Ubuntu as a server and cloud platform. I’ve authored many open source utilities used by millions of Ubuntu users every day. Open source software is my passion, my heart, and my soul.

    I was working in Cape Town, South Africa when I received a strange call from a friend and colleague at Microsoft in January of 2016. The call was decorated with subtlety as he danced around the technology underpinning what you and I today know as “Ubuntu on Windows,” but without any detail. There was plenty of confusion. Confusion around exactly what we were talking about. Confusion about how this could even work. Confusion about how I should feel about this.

  • Linux Mint 18 Sarah Xfce released in Beta

    So after the release of Linux Mint 18 sarah in the flavours of Cinnamon and MATE,now the team is focoused on working over other flavours too.As a result Xfce has been choosen to be the next flavour to be provided officially.

    So,If you were waiting for Linux Mint 18 to be available in Xfce DE(Desktop Environment) then Linux Mint team has started to roll the beta release of Sarah in Xfce DE. Linux Mint team announced the release of Linux Mint 18 Xfce Beta with some already known issues and workarounds too.This xfce edition features Xfce 4.12, MDM 2.0 and it is coming with Linux Kernel 4.4.

  • Linux Mint 18 Xfce beta is out

    While the release comes with the new X-Apps, the Mint-Y theme, new artwork, an Ubuntu 16.04 base, and version 4.4 of the Linux kernel, it still runs Xfce 4.12 and MDM 2.0, both of which were present in Mint 17.3. The reason Xfce and MDM are at the same versions is because they are the latest upstream versions. They'll likely be updated with new point releases in the Mint 18 cycle.

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GNOME Software 3.22 Will Support Installation of Snaps, Flatpak Repository Files

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

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Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

  • Linux Kernel 4.7 Officially Released, Introduces Support for Radeon RX480 GPUs
    Today, July 24, 2016, after a week of holiday fun, Linus Torvalds has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7 for all GNU/Linux operating systems. The Linux 4.7 kernel has been in development for the past two months, but that shouldn't surprise anyone who is either reading our website on a regular basis or keeping pace with the Linux kernel development cycle, which was very normal for this branch. A total of seven Release Candidate (RC) testing builds were released since May 29, 2016, which introduced numerous new features and improvements.
  • The Biggest Features Of The Linux 4.7 Kernel
    If all goes according to plan, the Linux 4.7 kernel will be released before the day is through.
  • The Size Of Different DRM Graphics Drivers In Linux 4.7
    Last October I looked at The Size Of The Different Open-Source Linux DRM/Mesa Graphics Drivers, but with it being nearly one year since then and Linux 4.7 due out today, I decided to run some fresh L.O.C. measurements on the popular DRM/KMS drivers to see their current sizes. This lines-of-code counting was mostly done out of a curiosity factor. In this article I'm just looking at the in-kernel DRM code and not the Mesa drivers, DDX drivers, LLVM back-ends, or anything else in user-space related to the open-source graphics drivers.
  • The Btrfs Windows Driver Updated With RAID Support & Other Features
  • Hardened Usercopy Appears Ready To Be Merged For Linux 4.8
    Yet another Linux kernel security feature coming to the mainline kernel that appears readied for the Linux 4.8 merge window is hardened usercopy. Hardened usercopy was originally based upon GrSecurity's PAX_USERCOPY feature but reworked into a whole new form, according to developer Kees Cook at Google. This hardened usercopy is to be exposed as the CONFIG_HARDENED_USERCOPY option within the kernel.

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS Fixes the Raspberry Pi Partition Resizer, Adds MATE 1.14

As part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement, Martin Wimpress informs us about the release of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS operating systems for users of Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS. Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS is not a major release, and if your Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) installation is up to date, you already have the latest software updates and security patches that have been injected in the new installation mediums generated mainly for those who want to reinstall or deploy the OS on new systems. Read more