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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 3:08am
Story Minimal Linux Live Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 2:50am
Story GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 2:38am
Story Red Hat Results Very Positive Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 1:01am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/03/2017 - 12:36am
Story Fedora 26 Linux Distro Delayed Again, Looks Like It Launches on June 27, 2017 Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 11:27pm
Story ARM boosts Big.Little with DynamIQ, and launches Linux dev kit Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 11:06pm
Story Four Things a New Linux User Should Know Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 11:05pm
Story Arch Linux-Based ArchEX Has Linux Kernel 4.10.5, Yaourt, and Calamares Installer Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 11:00pm
Story DragonFly BSD 4.8 Released with EFI & eMMC Support, Improved Kernel Performance Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2017 - 10:58pm

These Are the Default Wallpapers of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Linux Distro

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu member Nathan Haines is proud to inform Softpedia about the availability of the new community wallpapers for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

Ubuntu 17.04 just got its Final Beta release at the end of last week, and now that Final Freeze stage is approaching fast, it's time for us to have a look at the default wallpapers shipping with the final release, which have been contributed by various artists and photographers from all over the world.

Read more

Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 Review: Finally, an Android tablet built with enterprise users in mind

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Reviews

Show me an Android tablet and I'll show you a device that has yet to live up to its full potential. Google's Play Store lacks a wide selection of apps that support a tablet's larger display, with most apps only expanding the phone interface, in turn looking horrible on the smaller screen.

In addition to the lack of quality apps, Android tablets have lacked key accessories such as a keyboard.

For the most part, Android tablets have been relegated to a device used to catch up on Netflix or to entertain kids with games.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.04 inches closer to production

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu's final beta for version 17.04 has landed.

Zesty Zapus covers Ubuntu desktop, server and cloud editions, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Gnome, MATE, Studio and Xubuntu flavours.

It's not a huge feature boost, but the release is using the Linux 4.10 kernel, useful if your iron runs Intel Kaby Lake or AMD Ryzen silicon.

If configuring the Common UNIX Printing System (CUPS) is on your hate-list, there's good news: the release includes support for driverless printing.

Read more

Also: Getting Better Radeon Polaris Performance On Ubuntu 17.04 With Mesa 17.1, Linux 4.11

Linux 4.11 RC4

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.11-rc4

    So last week, I said that I was hoping that rc3 was the point where
    we'd start to shrink the rc's, and yes, rc4 is smaller than rc3. By a
    tiny tiny smidgen. It does touch a few more files, but it has a
    couple fewer commits, and fewer lines changed overall. But on the
    whole the two are almost identical in size.

    Which isn't actually all that bad, considering that rc4 has both a
    networking merge and the usual driver suspects from Greg, _and_ some
    drm fixes - and those tend to be the big areas.

    So on the whole things look fine. There's changes all over, and in
    mostly the usual proportions. Some core kernel code shows up in the
    diffstat slightly more than it usually does - we had an audit fix and
    a bpf hashmap fix, but on the whole it all looks very regular: mostly
    drivers, networking, arch fixes and some filesystem noise. Shortlog
    appended as usual for people who want to skim the details.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Fourth Release Candidate of the Linux 4.11 Kernel

    As expected, Linus Torvalds made his regular Sunday announcement to inform us about the availability of the fourth Release Candidate (RC) development release of the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel.

    Coming one week after the third Release Candidate, Linux 4.11 RC4 appears to be just a bit smaller than the previous build, updating the networking stack and many of the supported drivers to be on par with what was changed earlier this week in the stable Linux kernel branches.

  • Linux 4.11-rc4 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds has announced the Linux 4.11-rc4 kernel this evening.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft Sued After Windows 10 Upgrade “Destroyed Users’ Computers”

    In the lawsuit documents (via The Reg), the plaintiffs explain that Microsoft did not “exercise reasonable care in designing, formulating, and manufacturing the Windows 10 upgrade,” becoming responsible for damages caused to users in the form of data loss and hardware issues.

  • WebTorrent Desktop: Instant Video Streaming App for Linux Desktop

    WebTorrent Desktop is a cross-platform open source torrent client with which you can instantly stream audio and video torrent files without waiting to completely download them.

    It features a beautiful and modern User Interface, streaming support for videos from Internet Archive, music from Creative Commons, and audiobooks from Librivox, and has the ability to talk to BitTorrent and WebTorrent peers while providing a seamless User Experience.

  • Humble Store has some noteworthy deals on this weekend
  • clr-boot-manager now available in Solus

    We’re happy to announce the rollout of clr-boot-manager in our stable repository. clr-boot-manager, from the Clear Linux Project For Intel Architecture, enables a more bulletproof update experience by handling the maintenance and garbage collection of kernels, as well as configuration of the bootloader itself (i.e. GRUB2 for Legacy Boot, goofiboot for UEFI boot on Solus). Furthermore, it enables us to retain older, known-working kernels, so in the event a kernel upgrade results in the inability to boot, you’ll still be able to roll back to the last good kernel.

  • Ubuntu vs Arch Linux

    Comparing Ubuntu to Arch Linux. Focus is entirely on the underlying system, as Arch don’t offer a specific interface to compare with Ubuntu’s Unity desktop.

  • Packaging Ishiiruka-Dolphin (GameCube/Wii Emulator)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) To Kick Off Another Week Of Big Earnings Reports
  • Debian Project Leader elections 2017

    It's that time of year again for the Debian Project: the elections of its Project Leader!

    The Project Leader position is described in the Debian Constitution.

Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • RADV & ANV Vulkan Drivers Are One Command Away On Ubuntu 17.04

    Similar to Ubuntu 16.10, the Mesa Vulkan drivers are not present by default on new Ubuntu installations. But to get the packaged Vulkan drivers, simply sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers. When running some tests on Ubuntu 17.04 this weekend, I was a bit surprised to see that Mesa's Intel ANV and Radeon RADV drivers aren't present by default -- since it's been one year since the Vulkan 1.0 debut and the ANV/RADV drivers have matured a lot during this time. There's also more and more software becoming available that can make use of Vulkan while personally wishing for more Linux desktops to push Vulkan. But it's easy to install the Vulkan drivers as mentioned. Similarly, vulkan-utils isn't installed by default.

  • Wishful Thinking Of Non-Free Software Makers

    Regardless of my personal problems with non-Free software, the world has largely accepted FLOSS to SAS’s chagrin. I guess Canonical should be glad except they barely mention “Linux” on their site. What’s with that? They are like some purveyors of non-Free software that talk about the benefits of their products without even mentioning what the software actually does as if that’s best kept secret…

  • 2017: Should Linux Benchmarking Still Be Mostly Done With Ubuntu?

    Every year or so it comes up how some users believe that at Phoronix we should be benchmarking with Antergos/Arch, Debian, or [insert here any other distribution] instead of mostly using Ubuntu for our Linux benchmarking. That discussion has come back up in recent days.

    In our forums and Twitter the past few days, that discussion seems to have come up by some users requesting I use a different Linux distribution than Ubuntu as the main test platform for all of our benchmarking. As I've said before, Ubuntu is used given it's the most popular when it comes to Linux desktop usage as well as significant usage of it on servers / workstations / cloud. But I have no tie to it beyond focusing upon using the Linux distribution that's used by the most folks for obtaining the maximum relevance to users, gamers, and enthusiasts reading said articles. And for allowing easy comparisons / out-of-the-box expectations. On my main production system I still use Fedora Workstation as my personal favorite and in the basement server room there are a variety of operating systems -- both BSDs and Linux and from Antergos to openSUSE and Debian.

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up

    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!

  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser

    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs.

    There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.

  • Sex and Gor and open source

    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life.

    [...]

    I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.

  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament

    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament.

    While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.

  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find

    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.

  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series

    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL.

    [...]

    With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.

  • NextCloud, a security analysis

    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement.

    As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.

  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash

    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Filed under
GNOME

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why You Should Consider Open Sourcing Your Software

    Free & Open source software have grown so rapidly in the last few years. Just compare the situation of being ignored and considered like a nerds-movement in the early 2000’s to the situation today in 2017. We surly made a huge advancement so far. Thanks to the amazing ecosystem of open source which links both communities and enterprises together.

    However, when it comes to individuals, a lot of people are hesitant when it comes to open-sourcing their software. They think that the “secret” behind it will be stolen. They think that they will be releasing their work “for nothing in return” when they do so. That’s definitely false.

  • Caspia Projects and Thunderbird – Open Source In Absentia

    What does this have to do with Thunderbird? I sat in a room a few weeks ago with 10 guys at Clallam Bay, all who have been in a full-time, intensive software training program for about a year, who are really interested in trying to do real-world projects rather than simply hidden internal projects that are classroom assignments, or personal projects with no public outlet. I start in April spending two days per week with these guys. Then there are another 10 or so guys at WSR in Monroe that started last month, though the situation there is more complex. The situation is similar to other groups of students that might be able to work on Thunderbird or Mozilla projects, with these differences:1) Student or GSOC projects tend to have a duration of a few months, while the expected commitment time for this group is much longer.

  • Make Dragonfly BSD great again!

    Recently I spent some time reading Dragonfly BSD code. While doing so I spotted a vulnerability in the sysvsem subsystem that let user to point to any piece of memory and write data through it (including the kernel space). This can be turned into execution of arbitrary code in the kernel context and by exploiting this, we're gonna make Dragonfly BSD great again!

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • [Video] Litebook Alpha Review! | Unboxing, Apps, and Gaming!
  • Beginners Guide To Linux

    Curious about getting into Raspberry Pi or just Linux in general but you're not sure where to start? This post is for you. It's not intended to be a comprehensive guide, rather a gentle intro into the Linux world. I'm not a Linux expert, but I know from experience that it can be an intimidating platform to get started in. I want this post to show you what you need to know to get started with Linux.

  • [Video] 5 Reasons To Switch To Linux
  • System76 Provides Wireless Fixes for Ubiquity

    We are proud to have contributed to Ubiquity in such a way that we feel improves all users’ lives when using Ubuntu. We will continue improving the platform and hope that our users will see value in what we do.

  • GNOME 3.24 Released, See What`s New

    After being in development for six months, GNOME 3.24 was released today, bringing improvements such as Night Light, weather information in the date / time indicator, along with updates to its applications, and more.

Late Night Linux, Bad Voltage, and Effective Communication in Podcasting

Filed under
Interviews
  • Late Night Linux – Episode 06

    Jesse is back but this time Félim is in his sick bed so it’s a 3 man show yet again. Some heated debates about Nextcloud’s actions, Ubuntu extended support and PowerPC distros, followed by a deep dive into the world of HiDPI 4k support in Linux.

  • Bad Voltage Live at SCaLE 15x

    The Bad Voltage live stage show, from SCaLE 15x in Pasadena, March 2017!

  • Effective Communication in Podcasting

    When I got serious about doing Linux videos on YouTube, I drew on all of that Old Media experience plus I took a few classes to make sure I knew what I was talking about before handing out advice to others. That has led to the EzeeLinux project. The goal of EzeeLinux is to educate folks about Linux and get them started on the right path to success… I have been truly humbled by the response it has gotten.

    That said, I don’t feel like I’m competing with anyone – the more, the merrier! I honestly feel that Linux and Open Source Software are arguably one of the few truly good things happening in the world today. It brings people from all over the world together and provides a means to get cutting edge technology into the hands of anyone, anywhere who wants to take the time to learn how to use it regardless of their financial situation. That is the kind of power that can quite literally change the world, folks. No one should be left behind in this Information Age. Come to think of it, Ed Murrow would probably do a documentary about Linux if he was still around today… It would be right up his street, I think. It’s the kind of thing he liked to talk about.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • [Video] Linux Audio Programs Compared 2017

    I made this video for those that are new to, or just interested in making music on the Linux OS. I go over the features, goods and bads of Rosegarden, LMMS, Ardour, Mixbus, and EnergyXT, as well as touch on Qtractor. I don't don't go much into details of the particular versions I am using, but the video was made in the early part of 2017 and I'm running Ubuntu 16.04LTS.

  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux

    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.

  • Komorebi: A New Way To Enhance Your Desktop Using Animated/Parallax Wallpapers

    In past there were applications that allowed us to run videos/Gif as wallpaper on the desktop and make desktop look much cooler but than all of sudden the development of such Apps stopped and I can't name any App that exist for this purpose. Komorebi is fairly new application designed to make your desktop experience much better and make desktop cool as well, we can say it is kind of 'live wallpaper' situation here or 3D wallpaper. It is developed by Abe Masri and available under GPL license for free.

  • Stacer Sytem Optimizer: A Must Have Application For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    There are multiple ways to optimize your Linux, the most geeky way is using Terminal, there are also applications available that performs such actions like Bleachbit, Ubuntu cleaner and so on. Stacer is simple, open-source, quick and new application designed to offer you all-in-one optimizer for your Ubuntu/Linux Mint (It's alternative to CCleaner but only for Linux).

  • Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux

    Long years ago, we've talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.

  • Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More

    Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes.

    For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more.

    It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.

  • Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys

    Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser.

    The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.

  • Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA

    Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).

  • Terminix Terminal Emulator Renamed To Tilix, Sees New Bugfix Release

    [Quick update] Terminix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator, has been renamed to Tilix due to some trademark issues.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Games and CodeWeavers/Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • A Snapshot of Linux Gamers, Just One Year Ago

    It’s about time we share the analysis of that Q1 2016 survey (fielding occured in March last year), especially as we are about to launch the Q1 2017 one pretty, pretty soon. That way we will be able to compare how things have changed over the course of 12 months. As usual, the whole disclaimer about online surveys is valid here (data is only as good as your n size, the appropriateness of your sampling, and the quality of the responses, etc…), but assuming it’s not all that bad and all that unreliable, let’s dig in the results. As a reminder, most of the respondents for this survey were recruited through the r/linux and r/linux_gaming subreddits, as well as the readership of BoilingSteam. This is not our first survey, and you can see our previous ones done in the second quarter of 2015, and the following one in the last quarter of 2015.

  • Slime-san Coming To PC, Mac and Linux

    Headup Games and Fabraz proudly announce their upcoming action-platformer Slime-san for PC, Mac and Linux via Steam & Humble Bundle. Console releases will follow soon after. Jump and slime your way through 100 levels in a unique 5-colored, pixelated world and escape from a giant worm’s innards. Get your shopping done in Slumptown, a town full of survivors within the worm. Unlock different play styles, outfits, shaders and even multiplayer mini-games! Slime-san is developed by Fabraz, an independent development studio that also released the critically-acclaimed games Cannon Crasha and Planet Diver. Slime-san was minding his own business, sliming around in a peaceful forest when suddenly…A giant worm appeared and gobbled him up! Now deep within the worm’s belly, Slime-san has to face a decision: Be digested by the incoming wall of stomach acid... Or jump, slide and slime his way through the worm's intestines and back out its mouth!

  • CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 16.2.0
  • The Wine Revolution is ON!

    As you know Codeweavers (and other WINE contributors) have been working on DX11 support for a while – they were supposed to have DX11 support by the end of 2016, but as with all complex projects, timelines tend to slip and only very DX11 titles could run a few months ago. Since then, there was no major announcement, but it seems that the progress has been very significant in the recent WINE versions (2.3 is already out).

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Migration and Slideshow

  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2
    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).
  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts
    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration. One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture. In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location
    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized. “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.
  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking
    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier. Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.
  • Modules vs. microservices
    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.

OSS Leftovers: Harvard University Survey, ASF at 18 Years, Heiko Tietze at LibreOffice

  • Survey seeks to discover the motivations behind open source contributions
    Peer production is one of three fundamental ways to organize human economic activity, along with markets and firms. Yet, although it underlies billions of dollars in open source software production, it is the least understood. Participants in open source are not organized in firms, where they would work under the supervision of managers and earn a salary, nor are they individuals in a market, responding to price signals. The economics of peer production is an interesting area of study that raises many important questions regarding the incentives behind voluntary participation, the efficiency of production, the tools and models that can quantify and explain how the process works, and so forth. My doctoral research at Harvard University considered incentives issues that arise in a software economy. In particular, my work used principles from market design and mechanism design to address problems, such as how to incentivize high-quality submissions to address bugs or features, and how to elicit truthful prediction of task completion time.
  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces 18 Years of Open Source Leadership
    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today its 18th Anniversary and accomplishments, and rallied support to ensure future innovation.
  • [Video] LibreOffice interview: Heiko Tietze, UX mentor
    An interview with Heiko Tietze, who is working as a UX (user experience) mentor for The Document Foundation.