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Tuesday, 18 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Blog entry Big rpm update Texstar 11/04/2005 - 3:16am
Story Will Nutch Nudge out Google? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:17am
Story New Forum Open for Business srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:17am
Forum topic Thank You. srlinuxx 13/02/2005 - 5:10pm
Story Study Finds Linux Use May Continue to Grow srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:03am
Story World Expo Prez Predicts Future Growth for Linux srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Future of the GPL srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Government agencies adopt open source srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Desktop Linux Standardization srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:02am
Story Atari Plans New Matrix Title srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:01am

SQLite 3.25 Released

Filed under
OSS

The Linux Kernel Adopts A Code of Conduct

Filed under
Linux

Prior to releasing Linux 4.19-rc4 and Linus Torvalds taking a temporary leave of absence to reflect on his behavior / colorful language, he did apply a Code of Conduct to the Linux kernel.

Previously the Linux kernel had a "Code of Conflict" that some might feel is rather harsh. But now it's been replaced by a Code of Conduct that is derived from the Contributor Covenant that has been used by the X.Org Foundation / FreeDesktop.org projects, among others.

Read more

The Linux Kernel Has Grown By 225k Lines of Code So Far This Year From 3.3k Developers

Filed under
Linux

After writing yesterday about kernel contributions of AMD vs. NVIDIA vs. Intel, I kicked off the hours-long process of gitstats analyzing the Linux kernel Git repository for some fresh numbers on the current kernel development trends.

Even on an EPYC server with Optane 900p NVMe SSD storage, the gitstats process on the hearty Linux kernel repository is quite a task. But the process is done and offering a fresh look at the current Linux kernel activity in Git. Here are some of the findings:

The kernel repository is at 782,487 commits in total from around 19.009 different authors. The repository is made up of 61,725 files and from there around 25,584,633 lines -- keep in mind there is also documentation, Kconfig build files, various helpers/utilities, etc.

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Jono Bacon: Linus, His Apology, And Why We Should Support Him

Filed under
Development
Linux

I am also mindful of ego. None of us like to admit we have an ago, but we all do. You don’t get to build one of the most fundamental technologies in the last thirty years and not have an ego. He built it…they came…and a revolution was energized because of what he created. While Linus’s ego is more subtle, and thankfully doesn’t extend to faddish self-promotion, overly expensive suits, and forays into Hollywood (quite the opposite), his ego has naturally resulted in abrupt opinions on how his project should run, sometimes plugging fingers in his ears to particularly challenging viewpoints from others. His post today is a clear example of him putting Linux as a project ahead of his own personal ego.

This is important for a few reasons. Firstly, being in such a public position and accepting your personal flaws isn’t a problem many people face, and isn’t a situation many people handle well. I work with a lot of CEOs, and they often say it is the loneliest job on the planet. I have heard American presidents say the same in interviews. This is because they are the top of the tree with all the responsibility and expectations on their shoulders. Put yourself in Linus’s position: his little project has blown up into a global phenomenon, and he didn’t necessarily have the social tools to be able to handle this change. Ego forces these internal struggles under the surface and to push them down and avoid them. So, to accept them as publicly and openly as he did today is a very firm step in the right direction. Now, the true test will be results, but we need to all provide the breathing space for him to accomplish them.

So, I would encourage everyone to give Linus a shot. This doesn’t mean the frustrations of the past are erased, and he has acknowledged and apologized for these mistakes as a first step. He has accepted he struggles with understanding other’s emotions, and a desire to help improve this for the betterment of the project and himself. He is a human, and the best tonic for humans to resolve their own internal struggles is the support and encouragement of other humans. This is not unique to Linus, but to anyone who faces similar struggles.

Read more

Also: Kernel prepatch 4.19-rc4; Linus taking a break

Linux 4.19-rc4 released, an apology, and a maintainership note

Filed under
Linux

Another week, another rc.

Nothing particularly odd stands out on the technical side in the
kernel updates for last week - rc4 looks fairly average in size for
this stage in the release cycle, and all the other statistics look
pretty normal too.

We've got roughly two thirds driver fixes (gpu and networking look to
be the bulk of it, but there's smaller changes all over in various
driver subsystems), with the rest being the usual mix: core
networking, perf tooling updates, arch updates, Documentation, some
filesystem, vm and minor core kernel fixes.

So it's all fairly small and normal for this stage. As usual, I'm
appending the shortlog at the bottom for people who want to get an
overview of the details without actually having to go dig in the git
tree.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.19-rc4 Released As Linus Temporarily Steps Away From Kernel Maintainership

Stable kernels 4.18.8, 4.14.70, 4.9.127 and 4.4.156

Filed under
Linux

Games: The Darkside Detective, "Proton NVIDIA Users", Pig Eat Ball, Wizard of Legend and Total War: WARHAMMER II

Filed under
Gaming
  • Adventure game 'The Darkside Detective: Season 2' is on Kickstarter

    Ready for more adventures? The Darkside Detective: Season 2 will follow on from the original and it's currently on Kickstarter.

  • For those on NVIDIA, the 396.54.05 driver seems to have some noteworthy performance improvements

    It seems NVIDIA have been working on some improvements to their Linux driver, as the 396.54.05 beta driver seems to have improved performance in various games.

    Tweeting about it, Valve's Pierre-Loup Griffais said "Proton NVIDIA users: the latest 396.54.05 Vulkan Beta driver contains significant performance improvements in GPU-bound scenarios.". He also noted that those on Ubuntu can grab it from a different PPA provided by Canonical for easy installation.

    Looking around, it seems he's right on the money. Talking about it in our forum (also reddit), users noted improvements to games run on Linux. The improvements look pretty impressive too. The focus of everyone's testing seems to be DXVK which benefits from the new driver, so I went to test.

  • Pig Eat Ball is one of the weirdest games I've seen for a while, releasing with Linux support this month

    I've seen a lot of games in my time, yet developers somehow still find ways to surprised me. Pig Eat Ball looks totally weird, but also quite fun.

    Funded on Fig back in back in April, thanks to 252 backers along with a fair bit of help from Fig directly. The developer has now announced, that the release is expected on September 27th.

  • The rather good magical dungeon crawler 'Wizard of Legend' has a teaser out for the Sky Palace update

    Wizard of Legend, the dungeon crawler that has you take on the role of a Wizard is getting a fresh content update named Sky Palace.

    The update is going to include more enemy types, more special signature moves and a new location to fight in. I'm especially excited by this, because it's a really damn fun game to play by yourself and with others. I've enjoyed it just as much alone, as I have playing in local co-op with the mini-me.

  • Feral confirmed that Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux will use Vulkan

    Good news for those who want games that perform well, as Feral Interactive confirmed that Total War: WARHAMMER II will use Vulkan on Linux.

GNU/Linux Desktop Themes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Plane Theme and Icons Gives Your Desktop An Appearance Boost

    Plane Theme and Icons Gives Your Desktop An Appearance Boost
    Another theme pack with icons for your Linux Desktop. Plane theme is designed to make desktop more elegant and simple, it goes very well along with its own icon pack. Now a days many themes are under development for Gnome and Plane is one of them, it is constantly updating since 2017, fixing and making theme look better. It has some parts from Arc and Adwaita themes, also some other themes inspired author to make Plane more eye catching.
    There are two versions in this theme: light version and dark version which gives comfort to your eyes. This pack includes Gnome shell themes as well, which lets you match your Gnome shell with your Gtk theme.
    Primarily, this pack targets Gnome Shell desktop but can be used on other desktops as well such as: Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate etc. Icons are designed to use with this theme pack but if you want then you can use them with any theme of your choice. Themes are available for Ubuntu 18.10/18.04 and Linux Mint 19 via our PPA. Icons available for Ubuntu 18.10/18.04/16.04/14.04/Linux Mint 19/18/17. If you find any kind of bug or problem with this theme pack then report it to author and it will get fixed in the next update.

  • Shadow Icons Looks Great With All Themes, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Shadow icon theme is a new comer for Linux desktop, it looks beautiful with all kind of themes. It is meant to be modern clean and customizable, the primary color of this set most likely bluish and many apps icons are in round shape. So basically this theme is mixture of round and normal (square) shape icons, lets see where this theme will head in the future, it should choose shape what users asks. As creator mentioned this icon theme is his first so please bare any bugs or missing icons. You can report bugs or suggest new icons to include in this set via this link. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Wine-Staging 3.16 Released With ~880 Patches Still Atop Wine

    Busy since Friday's release of Wine 3.16, the volunteers maintaining the Wine-Staging tree with the various experimental/testing patches atop upstream Wine are out with their adjoining update that continues with just under 900 patches being re-based.

  • Some thoughts on State of Mind from Daedelic Entertainment
  • Summer’s End Roundup 2018

    Although it looked from the outside as if Mageians were sleeping through August, it wasn’t so! And now that it’s Autumn – fall for you folks in the North Americas – we’ll be more communicative, we promise.

  • Overriding misreported screen dimensions with KMS-backed drivers

    With Qt5 gaining support for high-DPI displays, and applications starting to exercise that support, it’s easy for applications to suddenly become unusable with some screens. For example, my old Samsung TV reported itself as 7″ screen. While this used not to really matter with websites forcing you to force the resolution of 96 DPI, the high-DPI applications started scaling themselves to occupy most of my screen, with elements becoming really huge (and ugly, apparently due to some poor scaling).

    It turns out that it is really hard to find a solution for this. Most of the guides and tips are focused either on proprietary drivers or on getting custom resolutions. The DisplaySize specification in xorg.conf apparently did not change anything either. Finally, I was able to resolve the issue by overriding the EDID data for my screen. This guide explains how I did it.

  • Technology streamlines computational science projects

    Researchers use ICE to study topics in fields including nuclear energy, astrophysics, additive manufacturing, advanced materials, neutron science and quantum computing, answering questions such as how batteries behave and how some 3-D-printed parts deform when exposed to heat.

    Several factors differentiate ICE from other workflow management systems. For example, because ICE exists on an open-source software framework called the Eclipse Rich Client Platform, anyone can access, download and use it. Users also can create custom combinations of reusable resources and deploy simulation environments tailored to tackle specific research challenges.

  • Google Chrome 69 gives worldwide web a stay of execution in URL box

    Google Chrome 70 arrived as a beta release on Thursday, bringing with it a handful of meaningful improvements and some more esoteric features of interest to developers.

    Available on the Chrome Beta channel for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows – the iOS beta requires participation in Apple's TestFlight program – Chrome 70 implements a Shape Detection API that allows web apps to do things like detect faces in images, read barcodes and parse text in images.

    The API is particularly promising for mobile web apps, which can now return the location of facial features within an image, turn barcodes and QR codes into strings and read Latin alphabet text found in pictures.

  • PostgreSQL 11 Won't Ship With Its Faster JIT Support Enabled By Default

    One of the coolest innovations landing this year in PostgreSQL was LLVM-based JIT support to speed up database queries. But it's not going to be enabled by default in the upcoming PostgreSQL 11 release.

    This functionality relies upon LLVM for JIT compiling SQL queries rather than passing those queries to the PostgreSQL interpreter. These LLVM JIT'ed queries have led to more efficient code being generated and particularly help with more complex queries.

  • n2k18 Hackathon report: Ken Westerback (krw@) on disklabel(8) work, dhclient(8) progress

Security: Windows Back Doors, Rogue Kodi Add-on, and Baseband OS (Back Door) in iPhone

Filed under
Security
  • Illegally Released NSA Hacker Tool EternalBlue Being Used to Mine Cryptocurrency [Ed: Microsoft's collusion with NSA for back doors continues to serve crackers well, enriching them.]

    One Year After Their Illegal Release, the NSA’s Classified Exploits Are Still Being Used to Mine Crypto

    One year ago, the National Security Agency suffered one of the worst leaks in its history: a series of classified exploits built by the NSA were stolen and published online. Today, those exploits continue to be used to attack cryptocurrency miners worldwide.

    One of the exploits, called EternalBlue, is a particularly effective backdoor exploit. EternalBlue can be used to silently break into virtually any Windows machine in the world.

    Hackers have used EternalBlue to install ransomware on thousands of computers worldwide. Government organizations, corporations, and even entire towns have ground to a halt due to EternalBlue ransomware attacks.

  • Kodi users fall victim to malware due to malicious add-on
  • x86 finds its way into your iPhone

    The baseband cpu is a standalone core that lives in your phone and is responsible for managing 2g/3g/4g/cdma/5g wireless communications. Given the absurd complexity of these standards, today a baseband cpu must be very powerful and enough general purpose, so the days of custom FPGA based IPs are long gone, at least for the main part. A lot has been said and written about basebands on modern smartphones, so I won’t repeat it. For our purpose, you just need to know that usually basebands are implemented using embedded friendly CPUs, like for example ARM (Cortex-M, Cortex-R or something inbetween), Qualcomm Hexagon (a kind of general purpose, VLIW dsp) or other more or less known architectures.

    Apple is nothing special in this regard, up until the iPhone8/iPhoneX, they used to have two different basebands, one for CDMA markets and one for everything else. The CDMA one was based on Qualcomm Hexagon dsp, while the GSM one was based on Intel XMMxxxx architecture. For those that like to play around with iPhone firmwares, you might have seen MAVxxx and ICExxx files in the ipsw, well those two files contain the firmware respectively for Qualcomm based devices (MAV) and Intel based ones (ICE).

    As you may know, Apple decided to drop Qualcomm and now they’re using exclusively Intel based basebands, so we will concentrate on this.

Software: Release of Foundry, Ducktype, AION Wallet

Filed under
Software
  • Release of Foundry (previously known as rlife) 0.2.0

    These past weeks, I’ve been working a lot on my side project and I’ve made a new release of it. First of all, the project has been renamed “Foundry” (instead of “rlife”). I wanted to find a better name for this project and as this project is now actually based on Vulkan (that was my primary objective when I started it), I thought it would be a good idea to give a name related to it. Plus, there was no crates already named “Foundry”.

  • Ducktype parser extensions

    When designing Ducktype, I wanted people to be able to extend the syntax, but I wanted extensions to be declared and defined, so we don’t end up with something like the mess of Markdown flavors. So a Ducktype file can start with a @ducktype/ declaration that declares the version of the Ducktype syntax and any extensions in use. For example:

  • AION Blockchain System Releases Desktop Wallets With Windows, Mac & Linux Compatibility

    AION has finally released its Desktop wallets; the product is Linux, Wndows and Mac compatible. The AION wallet underwent thorough tests and audits both internally and externally to have this milestone released for users. AION’s wallet is built for storing the AION altcoin as is the move by most of its peer competitors within the crypto space.

Red Hat leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Latte bug fix release v0.8.1

Filed under
KDE

Latte Dock v0.8.1 has been released containing important fixes and improvements!

Read more

Privacy Focused Android Rom Without Google Functionality Based On LineageOS Enters Beta

Filed under
OS
Android

A few years back there were a lot mobile OS systems, we had Symbian, Blackberry OS and IOS among many others. Google entered the market with Android, although it wasn’t an instant hit, they gained huge momentum overtime.

Part of Android’s success was definitely due to its open source nature and the massive customisation it offered. Android somewhat bridged the gap between budget and premium smartphones at that time, because it enabled so many functions on budget devices, it was truly something back then.

With time Android became a behemoth in mobile OS, but along with that Google was also benefitted. The OS used Google Maps, Gmail, Chrome, Google Play, YouTube and a lot of other customary Google software. This meant huge AD revenues but also privacy concerns as it’s well known that Google can pull out a lot of usage data from Android devices.

Read more

Also: iPhone to Android: The ultimate switching guide

KDE Week in Usability & Productivity

Filed under
KDE
  • KMail Now Supports A Unified Inbox While KDE Keeps Getting Polished

    Come KDE Applications 18.12 in time for the holidays, the KMail KDE email client will finally offer a unified inbox.

    The unified mailbox support for KMail allows for a single "inbox" folder of emails from all of your accounts as well as unified sent/draft folders and other folders.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 36

    Greetings, KDE-loving humans! This week’s Usability & Productivity is a heavy one in terms of importance. We scored awesome fixes and improvements through the KDE software stack for subjects as varied as Libinput mouse and touchpad device handling, Task Manager icon sorting for LibreOffice, and a snazzy new unified mailbox in KMail.

Multi-threaded Linux Performance: AMD’s Threadripper 2990WX vs. Intel’s Core i9-7980XE

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

To deliver a full-featured article for launch, my look at AMD’s Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and 2950X combined Windows and Linux performance in the same article. As it turns out, that was a mistake, since few people noticed we even had Linux benchmarks, despite there being an obvious demand for them.

Before publication, I debated on whether or not I should break Linux performance into its own article, but in this particular case, I opted for the combo because I felt the bigger picture was needed. That’s because in Windows, performance scaling on such a big CPU is hit-or-miss, whereas the Linux kernel seems to support AMD’s biggest no problem.

I am not going to stand here (or sit) and pretend to understand why the 2990WX doesn’t perform so well in all Windows tests, because getting a clear answer out of anyone is tough. No one wants to pass around the blame, but by all appearances, it looks like a bulk of the problem is Windows. This article exists to not only draw attention to that, but also highlight a bit better what the 2990WX is capable of – if the software in question can take advantage of it.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Reconfigure Installed Package in Ubuntu and Debian
  • How to Access Microsoft Exchange in Linux
  • Plasma desktop & HD scaling tutorial

    Say you have a small form-factor device with a high-resolution display. Case in point, my Slimbook Pro2 laptop, which comes with fourteen inches of equity and 1920x1080 pixel grid. This means things are rendered rather small, and if you wish to read or interact with the desktop environment and the applications in a meaningful way, you will strain your eyes - unless you're twenty and a developer, in which case you have bionic eyes.

    Prompted by this serious ergonomic need, I started fiddling with different options and settings, to see if I could adjust the viewability in KDE, and make the small screen shows things in a slightly enlarged manner. This turned out to be a rather long and non-trivial exercise. In this guide, I will show you how to properly and elegantly scale the KDE desktop, GTK applications (both 2.0 and 3.0 editions), Firefox and Chrome browsers with tips that also apply to all operating systems and use cases, and then some. After me.

  • Backup Installed Packages And Restore Them On Freshly Installed Ubuntu System
  • Getting started with Tmux
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How to get Apple-like gestures on the Linux desktop
    I understand a big part of the problem is that Apple owns patents on trackpad gestures, something which hinders the open source community's ability to create a quality experience. But that hurdle shouldn't equate to a bad experience, which many people have. Not only does Linux install without any sort of multi-touch gestures, it is sometimes over sensitive or under sensitive. I've installed Linux on laptop hardware and found the trackpad configuration was a losing battle—until I discovered Fusuma.
  • How to fix missing Python for Ansible in Fedora Vagrant
  • Did your open source career begin with video games?
    Certainly you don't need to be a gamer as a child to grow up and become a developer, nor does being a gamer automatically set you up for a career in technology. But there's definitely a good bit of overlap between the two. After listening to the first episode of Command Line Heroes, and reading Ross Turk's story of how MUDs led him to a career in coding, I've thought a bit about how gaming has influenced my own journey into technology, and how it lead to a career in open source. For me, that first important game was WarCraft II. Sure, I played games before it, and after it. But shortly after my family replaced our faithful Apple IIc with a blazing fast (by comparison) 486 PC with amazing features like color, and a sound card, and even a 2400 baud modem (that would take about three months to download the equivalent of an hour of Netflix today).
  • openSUSE to Have Summit in Nashville
    The openSUSE community is headed to Nashville, Tennessee, next year and will have the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville April 5 through April 6, 2019, during the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON. Registration for the event is open and the Call for Papers is open until Jan. 15. Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encourage to register for the summit and submit a talk. The schedule for the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville will be released at the beginning of February.
  • How selfless is your open organization?
    "Community" is a defining characteristic of open organizations. A community could be many things—a "team," a "group," a "department," or a "task force," for example. What makes any of these groups a true community is two distinct factors: a well-defined purpose and clear investment in or value of that purpose. How does a person balance a community's values with his or her own, personal values? How does that person negotiate this relationship when setting goals? Answers to these questions will expose and speak to that person's character.
  • Andres Rodriguez: MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 released
    I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 has been released.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 545
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 545 for the week of September 9 – 15, 2018.
  • Arm delivers production-ready open source Bluetooth Low Energy software stack to unleash IoT innovation
    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is quickly becoming the Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity protocol of choice for a variety of use cases, including smart lighting, smart cities and asset tracking, where low-cost, power consumption and small footprint are fundamental requirements. According to the 2018 Bluetooth Market Update, there will be more than 5 billion Bluetooth device shipments by 2022, with 97% of them containing Bluetooth Low Energy technology. The advances in Bluetooth 5 technology, along with the introduction of Bluetooth Mesh are driving new market opportunities across building automation, sensor networks, and other IoT solutions.
  • Digital Minimalism and Deep Work
    Through Newport's blog I learned that the title of his next book is Digital Minimalism. This intrigued me, because since I started thinking about minimalism myself, I've wondered about the difference of approach needed between minimalism in the "real world" and the digital domains. It turns out the topic of Newport's next book is about something different: from what I can tell, focussing on controlling how one spends one's time online for maximum productivity.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

OSS and Sharing Leftover

  • Announcing Heritage: An Open Source, Public Blockchain Project
    Heritage is a project of A​3​ by Airbus, the advanced projects outpost of Airbus in Silicon Valley. Airbus Foundation is the first strategic partner within Airbus to utilize blockchain technology developed by Heritage. Heritage is a decentralized application for the Airbus Foundation to hold charity fundraising campaigns internal to Airbus. Through open sourcing Heritage, Airbus Foundation will help charities onboard cryptocurrency and smart contracts, opening them to a new class of donor. Heritage hopes to set a standard non-profits can replicate to continue to grow the ecosystem while aiding an underserved market.
  • Versity announces next generation open source archiving filesystem
    Versity Software has announced that it has released ScoutFS under GPLv2. "ScoutFS is the first GPL archiving file system ever released, creating an inherently safer and more user friendly option for storing archival data where accessibility over very large time scales, and the removal of vendor specific risk is a key consideration."
  •  
  • Chrome Beta 70 Brings 2-Factor Authentication Via Fingerprint Sensor To Android & Mac
    With the beta version of Chrome 70 on the roll, Google has added yet another useful feature to make signing into the websites easier. As announced in an official blog post, Chrome now supports 2-factor authentication in Android and Macbook with the device’s fingerprint sensor.
  • Thunderbird 60 with title bar hidden
    Many users like hidden system titlebar as Firefox feature although it’s not finished yet. But we’re very close and I hope to have Firefox 64 in shape that the title bar can be disabled by default at least on Gnome and matches Firefox outfit at Windows and Mac. Thunderbird 60 was finally released for Fedora and comes with a basic version of the feature as it was introduced at Firefox 60 ESR. There’s a simple checkbox at “Customize” page at Firefox but Thunderbird is missing an easy switch.
  • Washington State Electronic Notary Public endorsements

    [...] This all seemed to me to be something that GnuPG is designed to do and does quite well. So I sent an email on Friday night to the sender of the letter requesting specific issues that my provider did not comply with. This morning I received a call from the DoL, and was able to successfully argue for GnuPG's qualification as an electronic records notary public technology provider for the State of Washington.

    In short, GnuPG can now be used to perform notarial acts <http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=42.45.140> in the State of Washington!

  • Surprise: Bill Introduced To Finally Make PACER Free To All
         This would be... amazing. We've spent years highlighting the massive problems with PACER, the federal court system that charges insane amounts for basically everything you do, just to access public records, and which functions very much like it was designed around 1995. There are a few court cases arguing that PACER fees are illegal and a recent ruling in one of those cases agreed. As we noted at the time, that was hardly the final word on the matter. A bill like the ones Collins introduced would be an amazing leap forward in giving public access to court documents.
  • Collins introduces bill to increase transparency and access to federal court documents
    Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) today introduced a bill to reform both parts of the federal courts’ electronic records system. “Americans deserve a justice system that is transparent and accessible. I introduced the Electronic Court Records Reform Act to modernize the judicial records systems and remove fee-for-access barriers that technology has rendered unnecessary,” said Collins. “As an attorney and the son of a law enforcement officer, I understand how crucial it is that this legislation ensures access to a freer, fairer and more accountable judiciary.”

Security: UIDAI, Wireshark, Hackers For Good

  • Software Patch Claimed To Allow Aadhaar's Security To Be Bypassed, Calling Into Question Biometric Database's Integrity
    As the Huffington Post article explains, creating a patch that is able to circumvent the main security features in this way was possible thanks to design choices made early on in the project. The unprecedented scale of the Aadhaar enrollment process -- so far around 1.2 billion people have been given an Aadhaar number and added to the database -- meant that a large number of private agencies and village-level computer kiosks were used for registration. Since connectivity was often poor, the main software was installed on local computers, rather than being run in the cloud. The patch can be used by anyone with local access to the computer system, and simply involves replacing a folder of Java libraries with versions lacking the security checks. The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), the government body responsible for the Aadhaar project, has responded to the Huffington Post article, but in a rather odd way: as a Donald Trump-like stream of tweets. The Huffington Post points out: "[the UIDAI] has simply stated that its systems are completely secure without any supporting evidence."
  • New CAS BACnet Wireshark Report Tool Helps User to Quickly Locate Intermittent Issues
  • Hackers For Good, Working To Gather Stakeholders To Find Answers To Cyberspace Challenges
    For a number of people, the word hacker means bad news. However, if some hackers have malevolent intentions, there are also hackers for good, and their skills were put to the challenge last week as they tried to save a fictitious city fallen into the hands of a group of cyber terrorists. The challenge was part of a two-day event organised by a young Geneva-based non-governmental organisation seeking to raise awareness about digital trust and bring accountability to cyberspace.