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Monday, 16 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME: Outreachy and retro-gtk Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 1:59am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 1:57am
Story Linux Kernel: Linux 4.15, F2FS, Block Layer Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 1:19am
Story Events: LibreOffice Conference 2017 and Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 1:15am
Story Newbie's Guide to Ubuntu 17.10 Part 2 Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 1:14am
Story Security: Kaspersky, Grafeas, Schneier Book Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 1:02am
Story Debian 9.2.1, New Kernel, Debian Installer Git Repository Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 1:00am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2017 - 10:28pm
Story Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2017 - 10:22pm
Story Today in Techrights Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2017 - 5:05pm

10 open source Linux robots from car-bots to humanoids

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linux robots come in all shapes and sizes from rovers to chatty humanoids. Here are 10 intriguing terrestrial robot kits with open software and hardware.

Back in 2014, we struggled to fill out our top 10 roundup of Linux-based robots and padded the list with conceptually similar autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In addition, many of those robots were proprietary or open source only on the software side. Today, however, it’s easy to fill out a top 10 list of Linux-based terrestrial robots that are open source in both software and hardware. In fact, we were forced to leave a number of worthy projects waiting in the wings.

Read more

How do you dump the firmware from a "secure" voting machine? With a $15 open source hardware board

Filed under
Hardware
Security

One of the highlights of this year's Defcon conference in Vegas was the Voting Machine Hacking Village, where security researchers tore apart the "secure" voting machines America trusts its democracy to.

The Voting Machine Hacking Village just released its master report on the vulnerabilities they found, and the participants are talking about it on Twitter, including Joe Fitz's note that he dumped the firmware off a Accuvote TSX with one of Adafruit's $15 open source hardware FT232h breakout boards.

Read more

Debian, Ubuntu, elementary OS, pfSense and Windows

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Debian
Ubuntu
  • My Free Software Activities in Jul-Sep 2017

    If you read Planet Debian often, you’ve probably noticed a trend of Free Software activity reports at the beginning of the month. First, those reports seemed a bit unamusing and lengthy, but since I take the time to read them I’ve learnt a lot of things, and now I’m amazed at the amount of work that people are doing for Free Software. Indeed, I knew already that many people are doing lots of work. But reading those reports gives you an actual view of how much it is.

  • OpenStack Development Summary – October 13, 2017

    Welcome to the seventh Ubuntu OpenStack development summary!

    This summary is intended to be a regular communication of activities and plans happening in and around Ubuntu OpenStack, covering but not limited to the distribution and deployment of OpenStack on Ubuntu.

    If there is something that you would like to see covered in future summaries, or you have general feedback on content please feel free to reach out to me (jamespage on Freenode IRC) or any of the OpenStack Engineering team at Canonical!

  • elementary OS 0.5 "Juno" GNU/Linux Distro Could Use Ubuntu's Snappy Technologies

    The guys over elementary OS, the popular GNU/Linux distribution based on Ubuntu, were interviewed recently by Canonical's Sarah Dickinson about upcoming integration of Snap packages into their infrastructure.

    As you are aware, there are three main universal binary packages available for GNU/Linux distributions, Snappy, Flatpak, and AppImage, and OS maintainers are free to implement which one they think it's best for their users, or even more of them.

    In the interview, elementary's devs revealed the fact that they want to go with Ubuntu's Snappy technologies to provide their users with a modern and secure confined app format because of the extra layer of security Snaps provide by design.

  • pfSense 2.4 BSD Operating System Debuts with New Installer, Drops 32-Bit Images

    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the release of the pfSense 2.4.0 operating system, a major release that introduces support for new devices, new features, and numerous improvements.

    Based on the latest FreeBSD 11.1 operating system, the pfSense 2.4 release comes with an all-new installer based on bsdinstall and featuring support for the ZFS file system, UEFI machines, as well as multiple types of partition layouts, including the widely used GPT and BIOS.

  • Dutch privacy regulator says Windows 10 breaks the law

    The lack of clear information about what Microsoft does with the data that Windows 10 collects prevents consumers from giving their informed consent, says the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). As such, the regulator says that the operating system is breaking the law.

    To comply with the law, the DPA says that Microsoft needs to get valid user consent: this means the company must be clearer about what data is collected and how that data is processed. The regulator also complains that the Windows 10 Creators Update doesn't always respect previously chosen settings about data collection. In the Creators Update, Microsoft introduced new, clearer wording about the data collection—though this language still wasn't explicit about what was collected and why—and it forced everyone to re-assert their privacy choices through a new settings page. In some situations, though, that page defaulted to the standard Windows options rather than defaulting to the settings previously chosen.

Security: Australia, IRS, and Grafeas

Filed under
Security
  • Australian defense firm was hacked and F-35 data stolen, DOD confirms

    The Australian Cyber Security Centre noted in its just-issued 2017 Threat Report that a small Australian defense company "with contracting links to national security projects" had been the victim of a cyber-espionage attack detected last November. "ACSC analysis confirmed that the adversary had sustained access to the network for an extended period of time and had stolen a significant amount of data," the ACSC report stated. "The adversary remained active on the network at the time."

    More details of the breach were revealed on Wednesday at an IT conference in Sydney. ASD Incident Response Manager Mitchell Clarke said, "The compromise was extensive and extreme." The attacker behind the breach has been internally referred to at the Australian Signals Directorate as "APT Alf" (named for a character in Australia's long-running television show Home and Away, not the US television furry alien). Alf stole approximately 30 gigabytes of data, including data related to Australia's involvement in the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, as well as data on the P-8 Poseidon patrol plane, planned future Australian Navy ships, the C-130 Hercules cargo plane, and the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) bomb. The breach began in July of 2016.

  • After second bungle, IRS suspends Equifax’s “taxpayer identity” contract

    The tax-collecting agency is now temporarily suspending the contract because of another Equifax snafu. The Equifax site was maliciously manipulated again, this time to deliver fraudulent Adobe Flash updates, which, when clicked, infected visitors' computers with adware that was detected by just three of 65 antivirus providers. The development means that at least for now, taxpayers cannot open new Secure Access accounts with the IRS. Secure Access allows taxpayers to retrieve various online tax records and provides other "tax account tools" to those who have signed up.

  • Google, IBM Partner to Tighten Container Security
  • Grafeas, new open-source API for the software supply chain, released

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Weblate 2.17
  • 7 Best eBook Readers for Linux

    Lately, the demand for digital books has increased as people find it more comfortable in reading a book on their handheld devices, Kindle or PC. When it comes to the Linux users, there are various ebook apps that will serve your purpose in reading and organizing your ebook collections.

    In this article, we have compiled seven best ebook readers for Linux. These ebook readers are best suited for pdf, epubs and other ebook formats.

  • How to write/create a Ubuntu .iso to a bootable USB device on Linux using dd command
  • Check disk usage at the command line with du
  • Install Redis and Redis PHP on cPanel
  • Qt 4 and 5 and OpenSSL1.0 removal
  • GLib tools rewrite

    If you’re still stuck with Autotools, though, you may also want to consider dropping glib-genmarshal, and use the FFI-based generic marshaller in your signal definitions — which comes at a small performance cost, but if you’re putting signal emission inside a performance-critical path you should just be ashamed of yourself.

    For enumerations, you could use something like this macro, which I tend to employ in all my projects with just few, small enumeration types, and where involving a whole separate pass at parsing C files is kind of overkill. Ideally, GLib would ship its own version, so maybe it’ll be replaced in a new version.

Red Hat's Growth and New Fedora Packages

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat continues steady march toward $5 billion revenue goal

    The last time I spoke to Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst, in June 2016, he had set a pretty audacious goal for his company to achieve $5 billion in revenue. At the time, that seemed a bit far-fetched. After all, his company had just become the first open-source company to surpass $2 billion in revenue. Getting to five represented a significant challenge because, as he pointed out, the bigger you get, the harder it becomes to keep the growth trajectory going.

    But the company has continued to thrive and is on track to pass $3 billion in revenue some time in the next couple of quarters. Red Hat is best known for creating a version of Linux designed specifically for the enterprise, but it has begun adapting to the changing world out there with cloud and containers — and as its RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) customers start to change the way they work (ever so slowly), they are continuing to use Red Hat for these new technologies. As Whitehurst told me, that’s not a coincidence.

  • New packages in Fedora: rtags, renderdoc

Kdenlive 17.08.2 and Krita 3.3.1

Filed under
KDE
  • Kdenlive 17.08.2 released

    The second minor release of the 17.08 series is out adding a rotate from image center option in the Transform effect among other usability improvements. In other news the dev team continues making progress for the much anticipated 17.12 release. Start the countdown!

  • Krita 3.3.1 Brings Fixes for Important Regressions to the Digital Painting App

    Only two weeks after the release of the significant Krita 3.3 update, the popular open-source and cross-platform digital painting app received a bug fix release that addresses some important regressions.

    Krita 3.3.1 is a minor maintenance update that fixes two important regressions, including a crash that occurred when restarting Krita after closing it with the reference images docker set to floating, and a bug that won't allow users to import unzipped .kra backup files or .kra files which were then archived manually as a zip file.

Pi-Top updates its modular, Raspberry Pi-powered laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi’s single-board computers are surprisingly versatile devices that can be used for all sort of things ranging from desktop PCs to game consoles to smart speakers. Hackers have also been building Raspberry Pi-powered laptops for years, and back in 2014 a UK-based team launched one of the more interesting versions, since the Pi-Top allowed you to modify the case designs yourself using a 3D printer.

Now company is updating its hardware with a new modular Pi-Top model that features a bigger, better display, a sliding keyboard that makes it easy to access the system’s insides, and an “inventor’s kit” to get you started with developing hardware projects.

Read more

Also: 21-inch capacitive panel PC taps quad-core Bay Trail SoC

System76 Adds Finishing Touches to First Release of Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) is almost here and the guys over at System76 are adding finishing touches to the first release of their Pop!_OS Linux distro, which will be based on Ubuntu 17.10.

During the Beta testing of Pop!_OS Linux, it would appear that System76 received a lots of feedback from the community, users who installed and tested the Pop!_OS Linux Beta release on their personal computers, but especially on System76's laptops and workstations because that's why Pop!_OS Linux was made for in the first place.

"Thank you for all the feedback that you gave us during the beta release last week. Thanks to your efforts many bugs that were exposed through your feedback were addressed," said Sriram Ramkrishna, Community Manager at System76. "Our release is less than a week away and the more feedback we get, the better the end result."

Read more

Wine 2.19 Released

Filed under
Software

Canonical Puts Out Call for Users to Test Ubuntu 17.10's Release Candidate ISOs

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's community manager Alan Pope recently put out a call for community members to test the upcoming Release Candidate (RC) ISO images of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.11 and GNOME 3.26.1 Desktops, More

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, you should know that it recently received some of the latest and greatest GNU/Linux technologies through a bunch of software updates.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • S10E32 – Possessive Open Chicken

    This week we’ve been playing Wifiwars, discuss what happened at the Ubuntu Rally in New York, serve up some command line lurve and go over your feedback.

  • Write is a Fantastic Handwritten Notes App for Linux
  • The developers of Solus are hoping to improve Linux gaming with snaps and their Linux Steam Integration

    The Solus distribution [Official Site] developers are a clever bunch, with their Linux Steam Integration [GitHub] software package and snaps, they are hoping to "relieve the pressure on distributions for supporting gaming".

    When I say snaps, I'm talking the snap package system, specifically from version 2.28 onwards which supports something called "base" snaps. You can read more about the idea behind base snaps here.

  • Gentoo Linux listed RethinkDB’s website

    The rethinkdb‘s website has (finally) been updated and Gentoo Linux is now listed on the installation page!

    Meanwhile, we have bumped the ebuild to version 2.3.6 with fixes for building on gcc-6 thanks to Peter Levine who kindly proposed a nice PR on github.

  • [Slackware] Updates for LibreOffice, Pale Moon, Flash

    The LibreOffice packages were uploaded to my repository last Friday, so you probably already have that installed. Never hurts to mention it for those people who did not subscribe to my RSS feed.

  • China's Alibaba and U.S.-Based Red Hat Ink Global Software Deal

    Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce and cloud computing giant, will start selling Red Hat’s business software globally, the two companies said late Wednesday.

    Many Fortune 500 companies run Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating systems on their own servers. They may also opt to run it on third-party cloud data centers run by Amazon Web Services, Microsoft msft , or Google goog because Red Hat already has formal ties to those three companies. Now, Red Hat is also allied with Alibaba and its Aliyun cloud.

    Red Hat rht Linux and other Red Hat business software will be available from Alibaba’s cloud within months, the two companies said. The news was announced at an Alibaba tech conference in Hangzhou, China.

  • PHP version 7.0.25RC1 and 7.1.11RC1
  • ExTiX 17.8 "The Ultimate Linux System" Is First Distro Based on Ubuntu 17.10

    GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton recently released a new version of his ExTiX Linux distro, which he dubs as "the Ultimate Linux System," based on Ubuntu 17.10 and Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch."

    Tagged as Build 171012, ExTiX 17.8 is the most recent update of the GNU/Linux distribution, which appears to be the first to be based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, but also borrowing some packages from the repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" OS.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Is Now in Final Freeze, Launches October 19

    The Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) GNU/Linux operating system is only six days apart and, according to the release schedule, it just entered Final Freeze development stage on Thursday, October 12, 2017.

    Work on Ubuntu 17.10 begun six months ago, on April 20, when the toolchain was uploaded to the repository, with the main goal of replacing our beloved Unity user interface with the latest GNOME 3 desktop environment. Two Alpha and Beta milestones later, Ubuntu 17.10 is now officially in Final Freeze stage.

  • Linux-friendly embedded PC pours on the PoE

    Aaeon’s rugged “Boxer-6639M” industrial PC supports 6th or 7th Generation Intel CPUs and provides 8x USB, 6x RS-232/422/485, 3x GbE, and 4x PoE ports.

    Over the last year, Aaeon has spun off a number of similar versions of its fanless, Linux-ready Boxer-6xxx line of fanless industrial PCs. The new Boxer-6639M is so similar to last year’s Boxer-6639 and the recent Boxer-6839 that it seems it could just as easily have been an optional SKU to either instead of a separate product. The new model does have one unique superpower, however: 4x 802.3at-compliant GbE PoE ports for up to 80W Power-over-Ethernet, which join the existing 3x standard GbE ports.

  • MEF joins ONAP to accelerate open source virtualisation

    A trade body counting Orange and Telefónica as members has joined the Linux Foundation’s Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project to use open source approaches in virtualisation.

Top 10 Open Source Linux Robots

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Back in 2014, we struggled to fill out our top 10 roundup of Linux-based robots and padded the list with conceptually similar autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In addition, many of those robots were proprietary or open source only on the software side. Today, however, it’s easy to fill out a top 10 list of Linux-based terrestrial robots that are open source in both software and hardware. In fact, we were forced to leave a number of worthy projects waiting in the wings.

The latest open source Linux robot to hit the scene — the Turtle Rover — won funding on Indiegogo only last week. This four-wheeled bot, which is larger and more sophisticated than typical wheeled robots like the popular, dual-wheeled GoPiGo, was designed to mimic Martian rovers. Another major player here is the recently rev’d, dual-wheeled TurtleBot 3.

Like most of our entries, these models are wheeled robots built around the Raspberry Pi. With the advent of the quad-core, WiFi-enabled RPi 3 model, we’ve seen far more advanced, and sometimes semi-autonomous Pi-based robots, in addition to the numerous RPi-based toy designs of recent years. Other SBCs have also inspired robot designs, especially the BeagleBone and BeagleBone Blue, which is especially suitable for robotics projects.

While open source hacker boards have expanded Linux robot development in recent years, a larger influence is the optimization of Linux platforms such as Ubuntu for interaction with the open source Robot Operating System (ROS) middleware. A number of our top 10 robots include ROS integration.

Read more

Games: Forgotten Lore, Heliborne, Grandpa's Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Programming: "GitHub CEO Predict Traditional Programming’s Death", GitHub Streak, Basics of Consuming REST APIs

Filed under
Development
  • “The Future Of Coding Is No Coding At All” — Did GitHub CEO Predict Traditional Programming’s Death?

    GitHub, also called “Facebook for Programmers,” has completed a decade this year. Today, it has become a go-to place for developers to share their code with others, indulge in collaborative approaches, etc. It’s now home to 24 million total users and 1.5 million organization.

    At the company’s annual GitHub Universe user conference, company’s CEO Chris Wanstrath made his final keynote address on Wednesday. Earlier in August, he announced that he’d step down as company’s CEO as soon as a worthy replacement is found.

  • GitHub Streak: Round Four
  • The Basics of Consuming REST APIs

    APIs are becoming a very popular and a must-know if you are any type of developer. But, what is an API? API stands for Application Programming Interface. It is a way to get one software application to talk to another software application. In this article, I’ll go over the basics of what they are and why to use them.

    Nom Nom Nom! I happened to be snacking on chips while trying to think of a name for my REST API talk coming up at APIStrat in Portland. Similarly, the act of consuming or using a REST API means to eat it all up. In context, it means to eat it, swallow it, and digest it — leaving any others in the pile exposed. Sounds yummy, right?

Security: Updates, Grafeas, Cloudwashing

Filed under
Security
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • 20 Most Promising Open Source Solution Providers - 2017
    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.
  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected
    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.
  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary
    He continues: “An open source model allows companies to see the assumptions behind the calculation and lowers the cost of entry into the cat modeling business. More importantly, the standardized and interoperable hazard, vulnerability and financial modules included in a true open source model facilitate the collaboration of data from insurers, reinsurers, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer programmers and individuals, all of which may result in a new generation of cat models.”
  • DevOps Skills Are Key to Collaboration within Organizations
    DevOps is one of the most highly sought skills employers are seeking to fill among 57 percent of respondents in the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, from Dice and The Linux Foundation. Specifically, firms are looking for developers (73 percent) and DevOps engineers (60 percent).
  • Projects You Can Help With For Advancing Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Graphics
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.
  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More
    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.
  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE
    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.
  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls
    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls. Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."
  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community
    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.

OSS Leftovers

  • 20 Most Promising Open Source Solution Providers - 2017
    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.
  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected
    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.
  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary
    He continues: “An open source model allows companies to see the assumptions behind the calculation and lowers the cost of entry into the cat modeling business. More importantly, the standardized and interoperable hazard, vulnerability and financial modules included in a true open source model facilitate the collaboration of data from insurers, reinsurers, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer programmers and individuals, all of which may result in a new generation of cat models.”
  • DevOps Skills Are Key to Collaboration within Organizations
    DevOps is one of the most highly sought skills employers are seeking to fill among 57 percent of respondents in the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, from Dice and The Linux Foundation. Specifically, firms are looking for developers (73 percent) and DevOps engineers (60 percent).
  • Projects You Can Help With For Advancing Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Graphics
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.
  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More
    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.
  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE
    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.
  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls
    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls. Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."
  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community
    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.

Tizen and Android Leftovers

Tizen and Android Leftovers