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Tuesday, 21 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Impact Of The CPU Frequency Scaling Governor On AMD Threadripper 2990WX Linux Performance Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:54pm
Story Security Things in Linux 4.18 and Embrace of Newer GCC Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:53pm
Story LinuxAIO – Test All The Ubuntu Flavours at Once Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:31pm
Story Nintendo Wii on Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:28pm
Story 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference and Another Linux Foundation Event in Dallas Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:26pm
Story Proprietary Opera Has a New Release, Goes Public Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:22pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:11pm
Story Robolinux 9.3 Raptor - Bird of prey? Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:10pm
Story Release 1.0.0 of Flatpak Roy Schestowitz 3 21/08/2018 - 1:02pm
Story KDevelop 5.2.4 released Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2018 - 1:00pm

A Fresh Look At The NVIDIA vs. Radeon Linux Performance & Perf-Per-Watt For August 2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With NVIDIA expected to announce the Turing-based GeForce RTX 2080 series today as part of their Gamescom press conference, here is a fresh look at the current NVIDIA Linux OpenGL/Vulkan performance with several Pascal graphics cards compared to AMD Polaris and Vega offerings. Additionally, with these latest Linux drivers, the current look at the performance-per-Watt.

It will be interesting to learn more about the GeForce RTX 2080 series in a short time, which will surely deliver significantly better performance and power efficiency improvements over the GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" hardware. But for a current look at how those cards are running under Linux, this morning are benchmarks for the GeForce GTX 1060, GTX 1070 Ti, GTX 1080, and GTX 1080 Ti while using the latest NVIDIA 396.51 graphics driver. For the competition on the AMD side was the Radeon RX Vega 64 and RX 580 (the GTX 1060 / RX 580 included in this article for a more mature look at the Linux driver support, namely for the AMDGPU+RADV/RadeonSI side). The Radeon tests were done with the latest Linux 4.18 AMDGPU DRM state and using Mesa 18.3-dev from the Oibaf PPA as of 19 August.

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Latest Deepin Linux Release Promises to Consume Less Memory Than Ubuntu, Windows

Filed under
Linux

Coming just two months after the Deepin 15.6 release that introduced new Light and Dark themes, Deepin 15.7 is now available with a focus on performance. It smaller ISO size by removing unnecessary components and optimizing the core system structure, better power optimization for laptops for up to 20 percent battery life, and improved memory usage.

"Deepin 15.7 has made a series of adjustments and optimizations in memory usage. In the standard configuration, the boot memory has decreased from 1.1G to 830M, and reduced to less than 800M on a discrete graphics card," wrote the devs in today's announcement, where they compared the memory consumptions of Deepin 15.7, Deepin 15.6 and other operating systems on the same computer.

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Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Daily Lives Now Ship with Yaru Theme by Default

Filed under
Ubuntu

We've been waiting for this moment for a couple of weeks now and we're proud to be the first to report that the Yaru theme developed by various members of the Ubuntu Linux community has now finally been enabled by default in the daily builds of the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system.

Of course, we immediately took a screenshot tour of the Yaru theme on today's Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) daily build so we can show you how great it looks. We think it's a professional theme that matures Ubuntu to the next level, and it is definitely a step in the right direction for the look and feel of the Ubuntu Desktop.

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The Performance Hit For A Xeon-Backed Ubuntu Linux VM With L1TF / Foreshadow Patches

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week L1 Terminal Fault (a.k.a. L1TF and Foreshadow) was made public as the latest set of speculative execution vulnerabilities affecting Intel processors. This Meltdown-like issue was met by same-day Linux kernel patches for mitigating the problem and does introduce another performance penalty but in this case is at least only limited to virtual machines. Last week I posted some initial L1TF-mitigated KVM-based VM benchmark results using a Core i7 CPU but the results for sharing today are using a much more powerful dual Xeon server.

For getting a better idea of the performance impact of mitigating L1TF/Foreshadow vulnerabilities I tested the Ubuntu patched kernel in a variety of configurations. First was the unmitigated Ubuntu 18.04 kernel, then Ubuntu 18.04 with the default out-of-the-box mitigation on the host and guest kernels, then having the host booted with the kernel parameter to force an L1D cache flush on every VMENTER rather than the default behavior of the conditional flushing, and then again when booting with l1tf=full for the full mitigation, which in the process also disables SMT/HT support.

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Blueberry Pi DIY hacker board taps Allwinner V3

Filed under
Linux

Marcel Thürmer has posted schematics for building a two-layer, Linux-ready “Blueberry Pi” SBC with a solderable, Cortex-A7 Allwinner V3 with 64MB RAM, plus WiFi/BT, Ethernet, USB, RGB, MIPI-CSI, and a 26-pin RPi header.

Hardware developer Marcel Thürmer has gone to Hackaday to announce the release of open schematics for DIYers to build a Linux hacker board called the Blueberry Pi . The open-spec SBC project, which was further revealed on Hackster.io, eases the path for hobbyists by using a simple 2-layer design — compared to 6x layers on the Raspberry Pi — and by incorporating a highly integrated Allwinner V3 SoC.

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Release 1.0.0 of Flatpak

Filed under
Red Hat
Software
  • Release 1.0.0

    Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This
    new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first
    introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version,
    and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible.

    The following release notes describe the major changes since
    0.10.0. For a complete overview of Flatpak, please see
    docs.flatpak.org.

  • Linux Application Sandboxing And Distribution Framework Flatpak Reaches Version 1.0 Stable

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has reached version 1.0 stable. Compared to the previous stable series (0.10.x), the new version should have faster installation and updates, it allows marking applications as end-of-life, and it asks the user to confirm app permissions at install time, among other improvements.

    Flatpak is a software utility for software deployment, package management, and application virtualization for Linux. Applications built with Flatpak can run on almost any Linux distribution. Flatpak applications run in a sandbox environment in which the applications are isolated from the rest of the system, and require permission from the user to access the user's files or access hardware devices.

  • Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Hits 1.0 Milestone After Three Years in Development

    The Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, formerly XDG-App, used for building and distributing conternized apps on Linux desktops, has hit today the 1.0 milestone.

    After being in development for more than three years, the widely-used Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework has finally reached the 1.0 version, which means that it's mature enough to be deployed and used in production environments for distributing and running Linux apps.

    "Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version, and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible," said developer Alexander Larsson.

  • Flatpak 1.0 Released For Delivering The Best Linux App Sandboxing

15 GNU/Linux Popular Apps in AppImage

Filed under
Software

Here's popular applications on GNU/Linux available in AppImage format in August 2018. They are LibreOffice, Krita, Kdenlive, OpenShot, Synfig Studio, Inkscape, GIMP, VLC, Emacs, and some more. I list here either they are official (built by original project) or unofficial (built by individual contributor). If you see the name probono below, he is Simon Peter, the founding father of AppImage technology. You can run these AppImages on your GNU/Linux distros (or even test them on LiveCD session). Finally, by publishing this, I hope all the original developers insterested to provide AppImage versions officially. Enjoy!

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How to Install, Change, Autostart Screensaver in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Screensavers are beautiful for desktops and should be available to everyone as part of their preferred OS. However, if you are Ubuntu user, you might be noticing a blank screen for screensaver. This is because, in recent past, post GNOME 3, the developers decided to drop the screensaver and keep a blank screen. This basic guide would help you to install, change and autostart screensavers in Ubuntu.

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First time with Linux: 30 installation tales

The Linux kernel turns another year older on Saturday, August 25. Twenty-six years ago it may have felt to the creator and BDFL Linus Torvalds that Linux would only amount to satisfying the needs of one. But today we know it has changed the lives of many.

To celebrate, thirty of our readers share what their first Linux distro and installation was like. Some of their stories are magical, some maniacal. And, it's no surprise that the tension and passion of these Linux lovers is palpable.

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Keeping patient data safe with open source tools

Filed under
OSS

Healthcare is experiencing a revolution. In a tightly regulated and ancient industry, the use of free and open source software make it uniquely positioned to see a great deal of progress.

I work at a scrappy healthcare startup where cost savings are a top priority. Our primary challenge is how to safely and efficiently manage personally identifying information (PII), like names, addresses, insurance information, etc., and personal health information (PHI), like the reason for a recent clinical visit, under the regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, HIPAA, which became mandatory in the United States in 2003.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Indian Bank Hit in $13.5M Cyberheist After FBI ATM Cashout Warning

    But according to Indian news outlet Dailypionneer.com, there was a second attack carried out on August 13, when the Cosmos Bank hackers transferred nearly $2 million to the account of ALM Trading Limited at Hang Seng Bank in Hong Kong.

  • How to Protect Yourself Against a SIM Swap Attack

    A sobering caveat: If a skilled SIM hijacker targets you, there’s realistically not much you can do to stop them, says Allison Nixon, threat research at security firm Flashpoint. “In most of the cases that we’ve seen, a sufficiently determined attacker can take over someone’s online footprint,” she says.

    That’s because ultimately, the machinations behind SIM swaps are largely out of your control. [...]

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 110 - Review of Black Hat, Defcon, and the effect of security policies

    Josh and Kurt talk about Black Hat and Defcon and how unexciting they have become. What happened with hotels at Defcon, and more importantly how many security policies have 2nd and 3rd level effects we often can't foresee. We end with important information about pizza, bananas, and can openers.

YunoHost 3.0.0.1

Filed under
Reviews

At this point I have only set up YunoHost, created a few user accounts and installed a handful of applications. While I may play with it further, my main focus going into this trial was how well the framework of the distribution functions. That is: is it easy to install, how hard is it for new users to add services and accounts, and is it straight forward to keep the system up to date? Basically, I wanted to know whether I could give this distribution to someone who wanted to set up home-based network services for the first time and expect them to be able to use it. Based on my experiences so far with YunoHost, my answer is: probably.

The distribution does make it pretty easy to create user accounts and install web-based services. In fact, YunoHost does this quite well. The admin panel is very streamlined, uncluttered and easy to navigate and getting something like a game of Hextris or a media streaming service installed is about as easy as a few mouse clicks. Managing the firewall, monitoring the system and creating backups are nearly as easy. The administrator still needs to figure out how to get backup archives off the disk to another location for safe keeping, but the bulk of the work in backing up and restoring the operating system is done for us.

Where I feel the distribution runs into trouble is mostly little details, and a few general concepts. For example, asking the user to create an "admin" password but leaving the root password as the default is both likely to confuse people and leave a permanent security hole on the servers of most inexperienced hobbyist administrators. On the topic of accounts, it makes sense, from a security standpoint, to separate web accounts from system accounts. But, this means there may be some confusion as to why, once an account has been created, it cannot log into the system. Little concepts like this may throw new users and I don't feel these issues are well addressed by the documentation.

The first time through, the system installer failed during the partitioning section. It worked the second time though with the same settings, so I'm not sure if this is a semi-persistent bug or a one-time error with my system.

On the whole, YunoHost performs well. It's light on resources, it offers a lot of common network services home administrators will probably want and it is pretty easy to run and maintain. There are a few little wrinkles in the experience, but in general I found the distribution to be straight forward to use. For people looking to set up a home server, this is probably a good platform on which to build.

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Software: GIMP, Password Safe, and Podcasts

Filed under
Software
  • GIMP 2.10.6 Introduces Vertical Text, New Filters, and GIMP Extension Public Repo

    A brand-new point release for popular photo editing software GIMP has been released today, bringing GIMP to version 2.10.6 – this update doesn’t bring a whole load of significant features, but there are some great improvements and new functionalities.

    For starters, GIMP 2.10.6 finally introduces support for vertical text (top to bottom), which has been a highly requested feature particularly for East-Asian writing systems. Thus, users can now set text in mixed orientation (as is typical in East-Asian vertical writing) or upright orientation (more common for Western vertical writing), with right-to-left, as well as left-to-right columns.

  • Password Safe is a KeePass-Compatible Password Manager for Linux

    Password Safe is an open-source KeePass-compatible password manager for Linux, designed specifically for use on the GNOME desktop.

  • Linux users finally get a decent podcasts app called, well, ‘Podcasts’

    Podcasts are a hugely popular form of “infotainment” these days, with almost any and every niche you can think of catered for with a show or a segment. If you’re not enjoying the wealth of podcasts out there, you’re really missing out. Podcasts provide you with the experience of a radio show, covering a wide range of topics ranging from gospel to science fiction to music and every thing in between. There are so many ways to enjoy your podcst. On mobile, popular apps such as PocketCast offer users a one-stop-shop for all the podcasts you can listen to. Many music streaming services like Apple Music and Spotify offer dedicated sections on Podcasts.

Belated KDE/Akademy Development/Coverage

Filed under
KDE
  • Kate projects and out-of-source builds

    During Akademy I once more was a bit disappointed how bad the project plugin of Kate can cope with out-of-source builds.

    At work, we use in-source-builds, as we normally only build in one configuration and have no issues with left-overs in the source directories locally. For this use-case, the project plugin works really well. You have your project local terminal view and that allows you all normal things you need during work, e.g. building + using the git command line client for the version control work.

    On the other side, with out-of-source builds, that no longer is that nice to use. Either you use the .kateproject generated by the “Kate – Ninja” or “Kate – Unix Makefiles” CMake generators, then your terminal defaults to the build directory, which allows building just fine, but no version control stuff, or you use the .kateproject (or auto-project creation) in the source directory, which doesn’t allow you to build nicely inside the terminal prompt of Kate. There are workaround for that, like having shell magic to switch between source and build directory with ease, but that all feels a bit unnatural.

    Therefore, I added today a very simple “fix” for the issue: If you have a .kateproject that has a different base directory (the toplevel “directory” entry) than the directory the .kateproject file is located in, you will get two terminal tabs in the project view.

  • Post Akademy

    So, it has been a busy week of Qt and KDE hacking in the beautiful city of Vienna.
    Besides getting quite some of the Viennese staple food, schnitzel, it was an interesting adventure of getting smarter.

  • My First Akademy!

    That day I also attended Plasma Mycroft BoF, in which Aditya told us about various new development and gave us High-Level Overview about working of Mycroft and also How can we make it easier for developers to make Mycroft skills!

  • Akademy retrospective

    I had an amazing time with the KDE community in Vienna this past week at Akademy. In fact it was my first Akademy despite contributing to KDE for so long, but Vienna was a great reason to make my first trip to Europe.

    [...]

    I led a BoF on this topic for kdesrc-build and participated in a few others as well. There’s a lot out there that we can do to improve our story here, in kdesrc-build and elsewhere, and I’m hopeful we can accomplish real improvement here over the next year. But it was also nice to see and hear a lot of the positive feedback our developers had about kdesrc-build.

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Shotwell, GNOME Asia 2018 in Taipei

Filed under
GNOME
  • Customing time and date formats in the GNOME top bar

    Do you want another time and date format in the GNOME top bar than what is set in your default locale? The Clock Override extension for GNOME gives you full control of what and how time and data information is display in the top bar.

    The GNOME Shell for Linux doesn’t provide a lot of customization options out of the box. GNOME really don’t believe that anyone would ever want to customize their beautiful desktop shell. They’ve taken their design-by-omitting-customization paradigm so far that they’ve even left out the ability to customize the date and time format. Fortunately, the GNOME Shell is quite extensible and users always do find a way to change things the way that they want them.

  • Face detection and recognition in shotwell

    After dabbling a bit with OpenFace, I wanted to add similar face detection and recognition abilities to a typical Linux desktop photo app. So I discovered Shotwell, which is a photo manager for Gnome. Shotwell had a partial implementation of face detection (no recognition) which was under a build define and not enabled in the releases. With that code as the starting point, I started integrating the ideas from OpenFace into Shotwell.

  • Shobha Tyagi: GNOME.Asia Summit 2018

    GNOME.Asia Summit 2018 was co-hosted with COSCUP 2018 and openSUSE.Asia Summit in Taipei, Taiwan 11-12 August 2018.

  • Umang Jain: GNOME Asia 2018, Taipei

    I am very pleased to attend to GNOME Asia(again!) that took place at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei this year. Its always great to see GNOME folks around, hanging out and have a social side of things. GNOME Asia was co-hosted with OpenSUSE Asia summit and COSCUP.

    [...]

    We had a GNOME BoF to address couple of issues around conferences: Mostly around standardization of conference organization, budget, effect of local team presence at potential conference venues etc.

What’s New in Ubuntu Kylin 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Kylin 18.04 LTS is the latest version of Ubuntu Kylin. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 Flavor, this release ships with UKUI desktop environment 1.0 series. Linux kernel has been updated to 4.15. Besides, all the special software and the jointly developed software are updated to the new version, including Kylin Assistant, Ubuntu Kylin Software Center, Kylin Video, Youker Weather, Sougou Pinyin and WPS Office. Especially, Electronic Wechat and Burner have been added to the default normal install for better user experience in work and entertainment.

WPS Office is a suite of software which is made up of three primary components: WPS Writer, WPS Presentation, and WPS Spreadsheet. Ubuntu Kylin team is working with Kingsoft Corp to continue providing WPS for Ubuntu Kylin users for free. Foxit reader is based on the Foxit for Linux and designed for Chinese user to be simple during installation. It provides a way to view, create and sign PDF files, and add annotations to them.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: X.Org Server, USBHarpoon, Kubernetes Penetration Testing

  • Three New Security Advisories Hit X.Org's X11 Library
    It's been a while since last having any big security bulletins for the X.Org Server even though some of the code-base dates back decades and security researchers have said the security is even worse than it looks and numerous advisories have come up in recent years. But it's not because X11 is bug-free as today three more security bulletins were made public affecting libX11. Today's security advisory pertains to three different functions in libX11 that are affected by different issues. The security issues come down to off-by-one writes, a potential out of boundary write, and a crash on invalid reply.
  • USBHarpoon: How “Innocent” USB Cables Can Be Manipulated To Inject Malware
    Back in 2014 Black Hat Conference, crypto specialists Karsten Nohl and Jakob Lell introduced the concept of BadUSB — a USB security flaw which allows attackers to turn a USB into a keyboard which can be used to type in commands. Now, a researcher from SYON Security has managed to build a modified USB charging cable that will enable hackers to transfer malware on your PC without you even noticing it. Behind the hood is the BadUSB vulnerability. [...] While BadUSB is gradually climbing the ladder towards the mainstream cyber attacks, people are also coming up with the corresponding firewalls to tackle the new age attacks.
  • Open Source 'Kube-Hunter' Does Kubernetes Penetration Testing
    Aqua Security released the open source kube-hunter tool for penetration testing of Kubernetes clusters, used for container orchestration. "You give it the IP or DNS name of your Kubernetes cluster, and kube-hunter probes for security issues -- it's like automated penetration testing," the company said in an Aug. 15 blog post. The tool -- with source code available on GitHub -- is also packaged by the company in a containerized version, which works with the company's kube-hunter Web site where test results can be seen and shared.

Linux-Friendly Hardware From Tranquil PC and Aaeon

  • Rugged, Linux-ready mini-PC showcases Ryzen V1000
    Tranquil PC open pre-orders on a fanless, barebones “Mini Multi Display PC” mini-PC with AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC, 4x simultaneous 4K DisplayPort displays, 2x GbE, and up to 32GB DDR4 and 1TB storage. Manchester, UK based Tranquil PC has launched the first mini-PC based on the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000. The Mini Multi Display PC is named for the Ryzen V1000’s ability to simultaneously drive four 4K displays, a feature supported here with 4x DisplayPorts. The NUC-like, aluminum frame system is moderately rugged, with 0 to 40°C support and IP50 protection.
  • Apollo Lake Pico-ITX SBC has dual GbE ports and plenty of options
    Aaeon’s Apollo Lake powered “PICO-APL4” SBC offers a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, and M.2 connections plus HDMI, SATA III, and up to 64GB eMMC. Aaeon has spun another Pico-ITX form-factor SBC featuring Intel Apollo Lake processors, following the PICO-APL3 and earlier PICO-APL1. Unlike those SBCs, the new PICO-APL4 has dual Gigabit Ethernet ports, among other minor changes.

State Certifies LA County’s New Open-Source Vote Tally System

Los Angeles County’s open-source vote tally system was certified by the secretary of state Tuesday, clearing the way for redesigned vote-by-mail ballots to be used in the November election. “With security on the minds of elections officials and the public, open-source technology has the potential to further modernize election administration, security and transparency,” Secretary of State Alex Padilla said. “Los Angeles County’s VSAP vote tally system is now California’s first certified election system to use open-source technology. This publicly-owned technology represents a significant step in the future of elections in California and across the country.” The system — dubbed Voting Solutions for All People (VSAP) Tally Version 1.0 — went through rigorous security testing by staffers working with the secretary of state as well as an independent test lab, according to county and state officials. Read more

Mesa and NVIDIA Graphics on Linux

  • Collabora's Mesa EGLDevice Work To Better Support Multiple GPUs
    As covered earlier this month, Emil Velikov at Collabora has been working on EGLDevice support for Mesa. These EGL extensions originally developed by NVIDIA are being pursued by Mesa developers for better dealing with the enumeration and querying of multiple GPUs on a system. Right now there is the DRI_PRIME environment variable to allow toggling between systems primarily with two GPUs (namely, Optimus notebooks have been the main use-case) but using EGLDevice support by the Mesa drivers the matter of GPU selection for OpenGL rendering can be made by the application/toolkit developer and for other scenarios like multi-GPU systems running without a display server.
  • NVIDIA 396.54 Linux Driver Released To Fix A OpenGL/Vulkan Performance Bug
    One day after announcing the GeForce RTX 2070/2080 series, NVIDIA has released a new Linux driver. But it's not a major new driver branch at this time (that's presumably coming closer to the 20 September launch date) with the Turing GPU support, but is a point release delivering a practical bug fix. The sole change listed in today's NVIDIA 396.54 driver update is, "Fixed a resource leak introduced in the 390 series of drivers that could lead to reduced performance after starting and stopping several OpenGL and/or Vulkan applications."