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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 9:44pm
Story Servers and Red Hat Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 9:43pm
Story Distribution Releases Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 9:41pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 9:37pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 9:30pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 8:33pm
Story Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 8:24pm
Story TheSSS (Smallest Server Suite) Linux OS Receives Latest MariaDB & Apache Servers Rianne Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 8:20pm
Story Open source Linux-on-Zynq SBC debuts new FPGA add-on standard Rianne Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 8:17pm
Story Why Linux can make you feel thankful or merely stuffed Rianne Schestowitz 22/11/2017 - 8:14pm

Compact carrier turns Nvidia Jetson TX2 into an SBC

Filed under
Linux

Aetina’s “ACE-N510” carrier for the Linux-powered Jetson TX1 and TX2 measures only 87 x 50mm, and offers HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, and optional -20 to 70°C.

When Aetina recently unveiled its Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) ACE-N261 carrier for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 and earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1 COMs, it mentioned an upcoming ACE-N510 that was even smaller. Now we have the details on the little beastie, which like Connect Tech’s Sprocket Jetson carrier, has a compact 87 x 50mm footprint that matches the Jetson modules it stacks on. The ACE-N510 is designed for smart cameras, robots, drones, industrial inspection, mobile medical, and deep learning.

Read more

OpenMandriva Is Dropping 32-Bit Support, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 Is the Last One

Filed under
MDV

Powered by the Linux 4.13.12 kernel, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 is an enhancement to the previous OpenMandriva Lx 3 releases, adding major improvements to the boot process. The OS also uses the Mesa 17.2.3 graphics stack with S3TC support enabled, the X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server, and systemd 234 init system.

On the user-visible side of changes, OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 ships with the KDE Plasma 5.10.5 desktop environment and KDE Frameworks 5.39.0 software stack, along with the latest Firefox Quantum web browser compiled with LLVM/Clang 5.0.0 and Calamares 3.1.8 as default graphical installer.

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Kali Linux 2017.3 Ethical Hacking OS Brings InSpy, Sublist3r, and SMB3.0 Support

Filed under
Linux

Coming two months after the previous release, Kali Linux 2017.3 is here with a new kernel, namely Linux 4.13.10, which adds better support for the latest hardware components, as well as all the security patches pushed upstream in the Debian Testing repositories, as well as various new tools.

First off, the Linux 4.13.10 kernel adds SMB 3.0 support to CIFS by default, rises the EXT4 directories limit from 10 million entries to up to 2 billion, and enables TLS support. Second, Offensive Security updated several of the included tools for this release, such as The Social Engineering Toolkit, Reaver, Burp Suite, PixieWPS, and Cuckoo.

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pfSense 2.4.2-RELEASE now available

Filed under
Security
BSD

We are excited to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.4.2, now available for new installations and upgrades!

pfSense software version 2.4.2 is a maintenance release bringing security patches and stability fixes for issues present in previous pfSense 2.4.x branch releases.

pfSense 2.4.2-RELEASE updates and installation images are available now!

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LXLE Eclectica 16.04.3 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

LXLE 16.04.3 is built upon Ubuntu Mini LTS. Lubuntu-core is used as a starting point.

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Kernel Releases: Linux 4.14.1, 4.13.15, 4.9.64, 4.4.100, and 3.18.83

Filed under
Linux

MAAS 2.3.0 (final) Released!

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 (final) is now available!
This new MAAS release introduces a set of exciting features and improvements to the overall user experience. It now becomes the focus of maintenance, as it fully replaces MAAS 2.2
In order to provide with sufficient notice, please be aware that 2.3.0 will replace MAAS 2.2 in the Ubuntu Archive in the coming weeks. In the meantime, MAAS 2.3 is available in PPA and as a Snap.

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Fedora 27 GNOME: Quick Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora is one of the operating systems that users wait regularly and with big interest. Fedora is a playground of new technologies that will later come to RedHat and its derivatives like CentOS.

Fedora 27 has been released on the 14th of November 2017. Let's have a quick whistlestop tour through the GNOME version of this operating system.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windows 10 switchover will cost Linux champion Munich €50m

    A major factor driving the decision to return to Windows appears to be changes in the political make-up of the council since the LiMux project began in 2003. Today the CSU political party, which has a long track record of opposition to LiMux, is also part of the ruling coalition in Munich. It was this coalition of CSU and SPD politicians that put forward the proposals to switch back to Windows 10 earlier this year.

  • Introducing BuildKit

    BuildKit is a new project under the Moby umbrella for building and packaging software using containers. It’s a new codebase meant to replace the internals of the current build features in the Moby Engine.

  • Containers and Kubernetes: What's next?

    If you want a basic idea of where containers are headed in the near future, follow the money. There’s a lot of it: 451 Research projects that the overall market for containers will hit roughly $2.7 billion in 2020, a 3.5-fold increase from the $762 million spent on container-related technology in 2016.

    There’s an obvious fundamental factor behind such big numbers: Rapidly increasing containerization. The parallel trend: As container adoption grows, so will container orchestration adoption.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces 2018 Events Schedule
  • Top 10 Moments in 2017 Linux Foundation Events
  • Marek Posts Gallium3D HUD Multi-Context Support

    Marek Olšák's latest project has been adding support for multi-context applications to the Gallium3D Heads-Up Display (HUD).

  • Updates from last 3 weeks or so...

    I took part in Codechef's November Challenge (which stretched from 3rd till 13th of Nov.) intermittently solving some of the tough problems (not necessarily quickly) to keep a track of my progress and increase my comfort in solving problems in a long contest setting.

  • Kodi Linux distro LibreELEC gets final Krypton update

    LibreELEC is a fantastic open source Linux-based operating system designed to run Kodi. It is particularly well suited for devices like Raspberry Pi. If you want to build your own Kodi box, it's ideal.

    Today, the LibreELEC team releases a new build that it expects will be the last from the current branch -- going forward the focus will be firmly on LibreELEC (Leia) 9.0 development.

  • Slackware Plasma5 updates for November

    I have uploaded my November ’17 set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current. KDE 5_17.11 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.40.0, Plasma 5.11.3 and Applications 17.08.3. All based on Qt 5.9.2 for Slackware-current and Qt 5.7.1 for Slackware 14.2.
    For Slackware -current there’s again a choice of ‘latest‘ and ‘testing‘ where the ‘testing’ repository contains 17 recompiled packages that provide a Wayland compositor stack. This means you have a working Plasma5 Wayland session if you use ‘testing‘ as opposed to ‘latest‘.

    The ‘testing‘ repository is for… testing. Do not use those packages on a production environment unless you are familiar with Slackware, debugging graphical sessions and know your way around slackpkg/slackpkg+.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Analysts Remain Upbeat Despite 0.26% Gain
  • Introducing the UP² Grove IoT development kit with Ubuntu

    As computing at the edge grows, so does the need to connect a flurry of IoT devices directly into a device that can do advanced analytics and processing. The whole journey from prototype to production is often bumpy, having to switch from a tangle of wires and development boards to production hardware: portability issues, lack of performance and so on. To help address this, Canonical is working with Intel, Arduino, AAEON and SEEED to deliver the UP² Grove IoT development kit. In short, it has the simplicity of development of Ubuntu Server, the connectivity options of Arduino, the community support of these 2 ecosystems and a clear path to production with support for the board and the software stack.

  • LXD Weekly Status #24: LXD 2.20

    The highlight of this week was the release of LXD 2.20 which introduces a number of exciting new features.

    LXD 2.20 should now be available everywhere through both native packages and snap.
    We also started the process of deprecating the various LXD PPAs, see below for details.

Software and Games Leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Kill The Largest Process In An Unresponsive Linux System
  • Linux Academy Expands Operations to Kansas City, MO
  • Finding Files with mlocate: Part 3
  • Banana Backups

    In the September 2016 issue, I wrote an article called "Papa's Got a Brand New NAS" where I described how I replaced my rackmounted gear with a small, low-powered ARM device—the Odroid XU4. Before I settled on that solution, I tried out a few others including a pair of Banana Pi computers—small single-board computers like Raspberry Pis only with gigabit networking and SATA2 controllers on board. In the end, I decided to go with a single higher-powered board and use a USB3 disk enclosure with RAID instead of building a cluster of Banana Pis that each had a single disk attached. Since I had two Banana Pis left over after this experiment, I decided to put them to use, so in this article, I describe how I turned one into a nice little backup server.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • How Open Source Tech Helps Feds Solve Workforce Turnover Issues

    Just as a mainframe from decades ago might be ready for retirement, the IT staff who originally procured and installed that system might also be preparing for a new phase in their lives. It’s up to the current and next generation of government IT employees to prepare for that eventuality, but there are indications they may not be ready, despite evidence that older IT professionals are retiring or will soon be leaving their positions.

    Unfortunately, a skills gap exists even among younger generation IT workers. Agencies are scrambling to find personnel with expertise in cloud service management, cybersecurity, technical architecture and legacy technologies, such as common business-oriented language (COBOL) and mainframes, among other areas. At the same time that many workers are getting ready to retire, leaving behind a wealth of knowledge, many younger IT professionals are struggling to gain the knowledge they will need to take their agencies into the future.

  • Introducing Fn: “Serverless must be open, community-driven, and cloud-neutral”

    Fn, a new serverless open source project was announced at this year’s JavaOne. There’s no risk of cloud lock-in and you can write functions in your favorite programming language. “You can make anything, including existing libraries, into a function by packaging it in a Docker container.” We invited Bob Quillin, VP for the Oracle Container Group to talk about Fn, its best features, next milestones and more.

  • Debian seminar in Yokohama, 2017/11/18

    I had attended to Tokyo area debian seminar #157. The day’s special guest is Chris Lamb, the Debian Project Leader in 2017. He had attended to Open Compliance Summit, so we invited him as our guest.

  • Overclock Labs bets on Kubernetes to help companies automate their cloud infrastructure

    Overclock Labs wants to make it easier for developers to deploy and manage their applications across clouds. To do so, the company is building tools to automate distributed cloud infrastructure and, unsurprisingly, it is betting on containers — and specifically the Kubernetes container orchestration tools — to do this.

    Today, Overclock Labs, which was founded two years ago, is coming out of stealth and announcing that it raised a $1.3 million seed round from a number of Silicon Valley angel investors and CrunchFund — the fund that shares a bit of its name and history with TechCrunch but is otherwise completely unaffiliated with the blog you are currently reading.

  • MariaDB Energizes the Data Warehouse with Open Source Analytics Solution

    MariaDB® Corporation, the company behind the fastest growing open source database, today announced new product enhancements to MariaDB AX, delivering a modern approach to data warehousing that enables customers to easily perform fast and scalable analytics with better price performance over proprietary solutions. MariaDB AX expands the highly successful MariaDB Server, creating a solution that enables high performance analytics with distributed storage and parallel processing, and that scales with existing commodity hardware on premises or across any cloud platform. With MariaDB AX, data across every facet of the business is transformed into meaningful and actionable results.

  • AT&T Wants White Box Routers with an Open Operating System [Ed: AT&T wants to openwash its surveillance equipment]

    AT&T says it’s not enough to deploy white box hardware and to orchestrate its networks with the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) software. “Each individual machine also needs its own operating system,” writes Chris Rice, senior vice president of AT&T Labs, Domain 2.0 Architecture, in a blog post. To that end, AT&T announced its newest effort — the Open Architecture for a Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS).

  • Intel Lands Support For Vector Neural Network Instructions In LLVM
  • p2k17 Hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on ports+packages progress
  • GCC 8 Feature Development Is Over

    Feature development on the GCC 8 compiler is over with it now entering stage three of its development process.

    SUSE's Richard Biener announced minutes ago that GCC 8 entered stage three development, meaning only general bug fixing and documentation updates are permitted.

  • 2018 Is The Year For Open Source Software For The Pentagon
  • Open-source defenders turn on each other in 'bizarre' trademark fight sparked by GPL fall out

    Two organizations founded to help and support developers of free and open-source software have locked horns in public, betraying a long-running quarrel rumbling mostly behind the scenes.

    On one side, the Software Freedom Law Center, which today seeks to resolve licensing disputes amicably. On the other, the Software Freedom Conservancy, which takes a relatively harder line against the noncompliance of licensing terms.

    The battleground: the, er, US Patent and Trademark Office. The law center has demanded the cancellation of a trademark held by the conservancy.

  • Open Source Underwater Glider: An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner

    Alex Williams pulled off an incredible engineering project. He developed an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) which uses a buoyancy engine rather than propellers as its propulsion mechanism and made the entire project Open Source and Open Hardware.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

Security: Linux, Free Software Principles, Microsoft and Intel

Filed under
Security
  • Some 'security people are f*cking morons' says Linus Torvalds

    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has offered some very choice words about different approaches security, during a discussion about whitelisting features proposed for version 4.15 of the Linux kernel.

    Torvalds' ire was directed at open software aficionado and member of Google's Pixel security team Kees Cook, who he has previously accused of idiocy.

    Cook earned this round of shoutiness after he posted a request to “Please pull these hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1.”

  • Free Software Principles

    Ten thousand dollars is more than $3,000, so the motives don't add up for me. Hutchins may or may not have written some code, and that code may or may not have been used to commit a crime. Tech-literate people, such as the readers of Linux Magazine, understand the difference between creating a work and using it to commit a crime, but most of the media coverage – in the UK, at least – has been desperate to follow the paradigm of building a man up only to gleefully knock him down. Even his achievement of stopping WannaCry is decried as "accidental," a word full of self-deprecating charm when used by Hutchins, but which simply sounds malicious in the hands of the Daily Mail and The Telegraph.

  • New warning over back door in Linux

    Researchers working at Russian cyber security firm Dr Web claim to have found a new vulnerability that enables remote attackers to crack Linux installations virtually unnoticed.

    According to the anti-malware company, cyber criminals are getting into the popular open-source operating system via a new backdoor.

    This, they say, is "indirect evidence" that cyber criminals are showing an increasing interest in targeting Linux and the applications it powers.

    The trojan, which it's calling Linux.BackDoor.Hook.1, targets the library libz primarily. It offers compression and extraction capabilities for a plethora of Linux-based programmes.

  • IN CHATLOGS, CELEBRATED HACKER AND ACTIVIST CONFESSES COUNTLESS SEXUAL ASSAULTS
  • Bipartisan Harvard panel recommends hacking [sic] safeguards for elections

     

    The guidelines are intended to reduce risks in low-budget local races as well as the high-stakes Congressional midterm contests next year. Though most of the suggestions cost little or nothing to implement and will strike security professionals as common sense, notorious attacks including the leak of the emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair, John Podesta, have succeeded because basic security practices were not followed.  

  • Intel Chip Flaws Leave Millions of Devices Exposed

     

    On Monday, the chipmaker released a security advisory that lists new vulnerabilities in ME, as well as bugs in the remote server management tool Server Platform Services, and Intel’s hardware authentication tool Trusted Execution Engine. Intel found the vulnerabilities after conducting a security audit spurred by recent research. It has also published a Detection Tool so Windows and Linux administrators can check their systems to see if they're exposed.

Debian Buster-Based SparkyLinux 5 Development Version Adds Full Disk Encryption

Filed under
Debian

Shipping a few days after the release of SparkyLinux 4.7 "Tyche" stable operating system based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch," the SparkyLinux 5-dev20171120 development build includes up-to-date packages based on the repositories of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system.

Apart from rebasing the operating system on the latest Debian Testing repos as of November 20, 2017, the new SparkyLinux 5 development images are the first to enable full disk encryption by default in the Calamares graphical installer, as you can see from the screenshots attached at the end of the article.

Read more

Raspberry Slideshow 10 Operating System Released for Raspberry Pi Computers

Filed under
Linux

Raspberry Slideshow is another Linux-based operating system that runs on Raspberry Pi single-board computers, this time designed to provide image and video slideshows, as its name implies. The OS is capable of playing different media formats from a Windows (Samba), FTP, or web server share, or from a USB flash drive.

The latest version, Raspberry Slideshow 10.0, is using packages from Raspberry Pi Foundation's Raspbian Stretch release, which is based on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series. It also adds support for all the Raspberry Pi models available on the market, as well as a number of improvements for better performance.

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REVIEW: The OnePlus 5T is not only a bargain, it's the best Android phone you can buy at any price

Filed under
Android
Reviews

The new OnePlus 5T is an excellent smartphone, but thing about it stands out from the rest — its $500 price.

That amount is actually near the top of what OnePlus has charged for its past smartphones. But the price is hundreds of dollars cheaper than that of many other top-of-the-line devices. Indeed, many of the latest flagship smartphones, including Apple's iPhone X and Samsung's Galaxy Note 8, cost more than $900.

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Linux Kernel 4.14 Now Ready for Mass Deployments as First Point Release Debuts

Filed under
Linux

Renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced today the Linux 4.14.1 kernel, the first point release of the Linux 4.14 kernel series, which is the first to be supported for the next six years. The Linux 4.14.1 kernel is marked as "stable" on the kernel.org website, giving the green light to OS developers to add it to their repositories.

Arch Linux developers have already pushed the Linux 4.14.1 kernel to the "Testing" repositories, for early adopters, so we may soon see a rebase of the operating system on Linux kernel 4.14, which brings major new features like support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption, Heterogeneous Memory Management to support upcoming GPUs, and bigger memory limits in x86 hardware.

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LibreOffice 6.0 Beta to Arrive by Week's End for Second Bug Hunting Session

Filed under
LibO

Announced today by Mike Saunders, the event will be held for the first time on a Monday, on November 27, 2017, from 8 a.m. UTC to 10 p.m. UTC. During the event, which will take place online, LibreOffice developers will try to triage and fix as many bugs as possible for the first LibreOffice 6.0 Beta.

A few days before the event, The Document Foundation will release the LibreOffice 6.0 Beta 1 builds for GNU/Linux distributions using either the DEB or RPM binary formats, as well as for macOS and Microsoft Windows operating systems. These beta builds can run in parallel with the production version, LibreOffice 5.4.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series. VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]
    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.
  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]
    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn
    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.
  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122
    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.
  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?
    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released
    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released
    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements. Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management. Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.