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Tuesday, 23 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Stable kernels 4.18.16, 4.14.78, 4.9.135 and 4.4.162

Filed under
Linux

Mostly Hotly Sought-After Linux Skills

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The 2018 Open Source Technology Jobs Report shows rapid growth in the demand for open source technical talent, with Linux skills a must-have requirement for entry-level positions.

The seventh annual report from The Linux Foundation and Dice, released Wednesday, identifies Linux coding as the most sought-after open source skill. Linux-based container technology is a close second.

The report provides an overview of open source career trends, factors motivating professionals in the industry, and ways employers attract and retain qualified talent. As with the last two open source jobs reports, the focus this year is on all aspects of open source software and is not limited to Linux.

This year's report features data from more than 750 hiring managers at corporations, small and medium businesses, and government organizations and staffing agencies across the globe. It is based on responses from more than 6,500 open source professionals worldwide.

Linux skills rank as the most sought-after skills in the 2018 report, with 80 percent of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise.

Linux is required knowledge for most entry-level open source careers, likely due to the strong popularity of cloud and container technologies, as well as DevOps practices, all of which typically are based on Linux, according to the report.

Read more

Programming: BASIC, LLVM's Clang C++17, and Mozilla

Filed under
Development
  • So I wrote a basic BASIC

    So back in June I challenged myself to write a BASIC interpreter in a weekend. The next time I mentioned it was to admit defeat. I didn't really explain in any detail, because I thought I'd wait a few days and try again and I was distracted at the time I wrote my post.

  • LLVM C++14/C++17 BoF
  • LLVM's Codebase Will Likely Move To C++17 Next Year

    While LLVM's Clang compiler already supports C++17, what this change is about is the LLVM code itself and for sub-projects like Clang can begin making use of C++17 code itself. This in turn ups the requirements for being able to compile the code-base. 

    As it stands now LLVM requires C++11 for being able to build the compiler stack, but at this week's LLVM Developers' Meeting in San Jose they discussed upping that requirement. While they could move to C++14, the unofficial consensus is they should just move directly to C++17. This enables LLVM developers to take advantage of all these modern C++ features.

  • Don't rely on the shape of (Native)Error.prototype.message
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Update on the October 15, 2018 incident on crates.io

    A user called cratesio was created on crates.io and proceeded to upload packages using common, short names. These packages contained nothing beyond a Cargo.toml file and a README.md instructing users that if they wanted to use the name, they should open an issue on the crates.io issue tracker.

    The rate at which this user uploaded packages eventually resulted in our servers being throttled by GitHub, causing a slowdown in all package uploads or yanks. Endpoints which did not involve updating the index were unaffected.

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Awards Crossvale Commercial Application Platform Partner of the Year.

    Crossvale was presented with the 2018 North America Commercial Application Platform Partner of the Year award by Red Hat. The announcement was made at the Red Hat North America Partner Conference held in Maryland on October 10th.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #52 – OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift Container Engine

    Last week Red Hat announced the general availability of OpenShift Container Platform 3.11. This is an important release because it incorporates the first wave of technology from the CoreOS acquisition. This includes new visibility for Operations teams through the Cluster Console and integrated Prometheus monitoring and Grafana dashboards. It also added support for a number of Operators, both from Red Hat and ISV partners (supporting the Operator Framework). This is important, as Operators will continue to play a more critical role in both the OpenShift platform, as well as for applications running on OpenShift. Finally, we discussed the recently released OpenShift Container Engine, and how it offers flexibility for customers that want Enterprise Kubernetes from OpenShift, but may want flexibility in certain areas of their deployments.

  • Knative: Building your Serverless Service

    In the Part-1 of Knative Serving blog series, you were introduced on how to build and deploy your first serverless service using Knative Serving. In this blog you will be introduced to another Knative component called Knative Build.

  • Agile Integration: Enterprise integration from a necessary evil to building competitive advantage

    Business success can be increasingly based on an organization’s ability to react to change. As new disruptive players enter markets and technology upends what consumers expect, organizations often need to change plans in shorter cycles. Modern software architectures and processes can help make organizations more effective at dealing with this change and emerge as leaders in their markets.

    "Planning as we know it is dead," was the keynote message delivered by Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat president and CEO, at the 2017 Red Hat Summit. "Planning harder in a less-known environment just isn’t the answer." In today’s world, the pace of innovation and disruption is accelerating in business. With that comes change, which can jar or break plans quickly and, in some instances, be extremely costly. Hence, the ability to react to change quickly can be a necessity. Enterprise integration can be at the heart of an organization's IT architecture. It may be necessary. But it is often a bottleneck.

  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst sells $709000 in Hatter shares

Happy 14th Birthday, Ubuntu!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Bust out the bunting and start cooking a cake because it’s Ubuntu’s birthday!

Yes, fourteen feature-filled years have flown by since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to share news of the very first Ubuntu release.

Ubuntu 4.10 ‘Warty Warthog’ was thrust into the world on Wednesday October 20, 2004.

Read more

GNOME: Vala Scripting and GNOME Foundation Hackfest 2018

Filed under
GNOME
  • Daniel Espinosa: Vala Scripting?

    I’m working with a library called GNOME Vala Language Server (GVls), as a proof of concept for a server that will serve autocompletion, syntax highlighting and that kind of stuff, but found something interesting by accident.

    I’ve added an interface called Client, may is not it final name, but it allows to locale a symbol in a already parsed file, along with some goodness from other interfaces and implementations, I’ll talk about in another article.

  • GNOME Foundation Hackfest 2018

    This week, the GNOME Foundation Board of Directors met at the Collabora office in Cambridge, UK, for the second annual Foundation Hackfest. We were also joined by the Executive Director, Neil McGovern, and Director of Operations, Rosanna Yuen. This event was started by last year’s board and is a great opportunity for the newly-elected board to set out goals for the coming year and get some uninterrupted hacking done on policies, documents, etc. While it’s fresh in our mind, we wanted to tell you about some of the things we have been working on this week and what the community can hope to see in the coming months.

BSD and Security

Filed under
BSD

Games: To Leave, Squally, and More

Filed under
Gaming

Software: Screenshot, inxi, Weblate, Wine

Filed under
Software
  • What is your favorite Linux screen capture tool?

    The ability to take screenshots in Linux is something that I find really useful when composing how-tos and training materials for students or readers. But there are many different ways to do this.

    My own personal favorite is Gnome Screenshot. Typically I use Linux on a desktop or laptop and the training materials even those on those that feature the command line can be easily captured by Gnome Screenshot. I like it because it provides some options that make later use of those screen grabs easy to use. The need for additional editing of the screen grabs is precluded when you can easily tailor each screen grab to exactly what you are trying to capture. Your options include grabbing the whole screen, grabbing just the current window, or selecting an area to grab. Screenshot also provides an option to time the delay of the screen grab.

  • Essential System Tools: inxi – CLI system information tool

    This is the fifth in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities.

    The first tools under the spotlight were ps_mem, a small utility that accurately reports memory consumption of software, and gtop, a system monitoring dashboard. The third tool we showcased was pet, a simple command-line snippet manager. We then covered Alacritty, an innovative graphical utility.

  • translation-finder 0.1

    Setting up translation components in Weblate can be tricky in some cases, especially if you lack knowledge of the translation format you are using. Also this is something we wanted to automate from the very beginning, but there were always more pressing things to implement. But now the time is coming as I've just made first beta release of translation-finder, tool to help with this.

  • Wine Developers Plot Their Path For Integrating FAudio As The XAudio2 Reimplementation

    A few days back Linux game porter/developer Ethan Lee joined CodeWeavers to work on Wine/Proton for Valve. In particular, he's going to be focusing on his FAudio project as a Windows XAudio(2) re-implementation. CodeWeavers appears to be eager on getting FAudio merged into upstream Wine.

    FAudio is part of Ethan Lee's FNA-XNA project as a re-implementation of the Microsoft XNA Game Studio libraries. FNA and FAudio has already helped game developers port their code to more platforms and now FAudio is being hooked up in Wine to help Windows games run on Linux. FAudio has been developed as an accurate DirectX Audio run-time libraries including XAudio2, X3DAudio, and other components. FAudio is cross-platform itself and only depends on SDL2.

Desktop GNU/Linux: Chromebooks, LG, and 'World Domination'

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Google Will Improve Linux in Chrome OS with Folder Sharing and More
  • LG Gram Laptops To Be Better Supported By The Next Linux Kernel

    While LG isn't often thought of as a laptop manufacturer, their Gram laptop line-up has recently been making some waves. The LG Gram laptops are powered by Intel Core CPUs and are designed to be slim and sleek yet durable. With the next Linux kernel (4.20~5.0), they should be better supported should you want to wipe the default Microsoft Windows installation.

  • When the Problem Is the Story

    That's because Linux has achieved the world domination it longed for in the early years.

    Yes, Linus as a character got interesting for a few minutes last month (top results in a Google News search for "Linus Torvalds" range from 22 to 29 days old), but that story is too stale to be interesting now, even though the issues around it still matter.

    And that's my point here. Lots of subjects matter that stories do a lousy job of telling.

    But to journalism, and to the human beings journalism addresses, stories matter more than anything. Stories are clearly the base format of human interest.

Jetson TX2, Gemini Lake, and Kaby Lake based mini-PCs run Linux

Filed under
Hardware

Cirrus7 unveiled an “AI-Box TX2” mini-PC with a Jetson TX2 module and -20 to 70°C support. The company also offers four, similarly Linux-friendly Kaby Lake-based mini-PCs and a new Gemini Lake model.

Cirrus7 is a German manufacturer of Intel Core based mini-PCs that are available barebone or with pre-installed Ubuntu, Linux Mint, or Windows. Now the company has stepped into the Arm world with a mini-PC based on Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 module.

Read more

Ubuntu News Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical publishes user statistics that it collected during Ubuntu 18.04 LTS cycle

    Canonical has published the user statistics information that it collected during the first six months of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS cycle. The page was posted following the release of Ubuntu 18.10 yesterday and it reveals quite a lot of information about installations including computer details, the languages used, the country of the install and much more.

    With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Canonical began collecting information of users who decided to opt-in. According to the firm, 66% of users decided to do so. It found that clean installs made up 80% of the total installations, while upgrades made up for 20%. The firm also derived the location of Ubuntu users using the time zone and location options in the installer, rather than an identifiable IP address; surprisingly some of the countries Ubuntu was used a lot included Mexico, Brazil, Angola, Egypt, Afghanistan, South Korea, and Australia. They found English was the most popular language with 59%.

  • What’s Your Ubuntu 19.04 Codename Prediction?

    It’s that really fun part of the release cycle where we get you to try and guess the name of the next Ubuntu release!

    it could, at this point, be literally anything — but what do think the codename of Ubuntu 19.04 will be?

    Ten years on since Ubuntu 9.04 ‘Jaunty Jackalope’, the first release this site covered, plenty has changed.

    But so entrenched is that particular release that my muscle memory is still programmed to type 9.04 instead of 19.04 — so if you see a lot of errant 1s in future posts, you know why!

  • Canonical: Snaps Are Used Worldwide, over 3M Installs Monthly and 100K Daily

    To celebrate the release of the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system, Canonical published a new infographic to show us how well its Snap universal package format is doing lately.

    Entitled "Snaps in numbers," the new infographics focuses on how widely spread are Snaps, Canonical's universal binary format that makes it easier to distribute applications across multiple Linux-based operating systems. Initially called Snappy, the technology provides secure, rolling updates to your favorite apps.

    "Coinciding with the release of Ubuntu 18.10 today, we have celebrated the exceptional adoption of snaps by sharing the infographic below," said Canonical. "From popular snaps to daily installs, this infographic demonstrates where, when and why users are installing and adopting the secure, Linux application format."

  • Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish Linux Release

    The Ubuntu 18.10 Linux release became generally available on Oct 18, providing new capabilities for desktop, server and cloud users.

    On the desktop there is a new theme called "Yaru" that provides a different look and feel than what was provided by default in the prior 18.04 LTS release. Unlike 18.04, the 18.10 update is not a Long Term Support (LTS) release and will not get five years of support, instead it will only have nine months of support.

    On the server side, Ubuntu 18.10 benefits from an updated Linux 4.18 kernel as well as support for TLS 1.3 encryption. The Ubuntu Server 18.10 integrated the OpenStack Rocky release, providing users with a stable version of the most recent open source OpenStack cloud platform release.

  • Welcome Ubuntu Desktop 18.10

    The Cosmic Cuttlefish has arrived. Ubuntu 18.10 is out and represents the first step on the road to the next LTS in April 2020. This release of Ubuntu comes with 9 months of support and brings the latest update to the GNOME stack, improvements to the snap experience on the desktop, some new features and usability improvements, and a fresh new theme developed by the awesome Yaru developer community.

  • Ubuntu events in November

    November is just around the corner, winter jumpers are being dug out from the back of the wardrobe and it’s now acceptable to put the heating on.

    Although many may be considering hibernation, the Ubuntu team here at Canonical will be out and about around the world at a number of big events.

    So if you want to know where you can catch up with the Ubuntu team at Canonical and learn about the latest developments then you can find us here:

  • Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" Has Been Released and More Linux News
  • Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Has Been Released | Download

    The latest stable release Ubuntu 18.10 with a code name (Cosmic Cuttlefish) has been released. Ubuntu 18.10 comes with 7 different flavours, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu Mate, Ubuntu Studio, Xubuntu, and the main release Ubuntu with Gnome desktop environment.

  • SD Times news digest: Datalore 1.0, MIT’s smarter homes, and Ubuntu 18.10

    Ubuntu 18.10 has been released, and has several updates that make it optimized for multi-cloud deployments and AI software development. It features a new community desktop theme, adding fingerprint unlock functionality for compatible PCs.

    It also has a richer snap desktop integration, and now allows native desktop control to access files on the host system.

Ubuntu-Based Distros on Devices: GPD and System76

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • There’s an official Ubuntu MATE 18.10 build for GPD Pocket devices

    Canonical released Ubuntu 18.10 this week. But Ubuntu isn’t just a single operating system: there are also a bunch of official and unofficial flavors.

    So this week we also got Kubuntu 18.10, Lubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu MATE 18.10, and Ubuntu Budgie 18.10, just to name a few. They include core Ubuntu updates plus a group of additional changes that are specific to the desktop environment and apps used by each of these projects.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 released with new desktop theme

    Canonical released a new version of the organization's Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution; Ubuntu 18.10, called Cosmic Cuttlefish, comes with a new community desktop theme, improved snap desktop integration, multi-cloud computing optimizations and other improvements.

    Ubuntu 18.10 will be supported for nine months; organizations and users who require long term support should stay with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS instead which is supported for five years.

  • GPD Pocket devices get special Ubuntu MATE 18.10 Linux image

    Just yesterday, Ubuntu 18.10 was released. "Cosmic Cuttlefish," as the operating system is called, is available in several flavors featuring various desktop environments other than the stock GNOME -- Xfce (Xbuntu), KDE (Kubuntu), and more.

  • See what changes have been orbiting Pop!_OS!

    Your favorite Pop!_erating system has leveled up with Pop!_18.10. Most of the new updates will also be rolled into Pop!_18.04. Here’s what we’ve been working on since our last Pop!_OS announcement:
    New kernel, graphic stack, and GNOME desktop environment for Pop!_18.10

  • System76 Pop!_OS Updated Against Ubuntu 18.10, Adds In Extra Changes

    In addition to System76 being busy finishing up work on their new PC build factory in Denver and making their first foray into open-source hardware, they also continue working on Pop!_OS as their downstream of Ubuntu Linux with various features added in.

    While System76 has been shipping Ubuntu-loaded laptops and desktops for more than a decade, they have been trying to differentiate themselves on the hardware and software front. The Pop!_OS effort has come a long way over the past year and out now is their 18.10 release based upon the newly-minuted Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish.

Kickstarting the Makerphone: an open-source hardware phone kit, programmable with python and Scratch

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Circuitmess's fully funded Makerphone kickstarter is raising money to produce open source hardware smartphone kits to teach kids (and grownups) everything from soldering to programming.

The Makerphone is a pretty sweet-looking gadget, and it comes ready to be programmed with Scratch and python, providing a good progression from a fully graphic programming environment to a command-line language that's still beginner-friendly.

$94 gets you a kit and the tools to assemble it; $99 gets you an assembled phone. The project's runners have previously delivered on kickstarted open source hardware kits, which bodes well for getting something for your money.

Read more

Graphics: Mesa 18.2.3, AMDVLK and Intel KVMGT

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.2.3

    Mesa 18.2.3 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    Different patches for the DirectX9 and DRI state trackers.

    Several fixes and workarounds for different games, inlcuding RAGE, Yakuza and
    The Evil Within, Wolfenstein The Old Blood ARMA 3, or No Mans Sky.

    A bunch of fixes for different drivers, including r600, nouveau, radeonsi, anv,
    radv, virgl, i965, nvc0 or nv50. Worth to mention a fix for GPU hangs in
    Radeonsi.

    State Trackers also get different fixes and corrections.

    Finally, fixes for GLSL and NIR are also in this queue.

  • Mesa 18.2.3 Released With Latest Driver Workarounds For Steam Play / Proton

    Mesa 18.2.3 is out today as the latest point release to the Mesa 18.2 stable series. Notable to this point release are several bug fixes and workarounds to benefit Steam Play / Wine (and the Valve downstream Proton) and various new games being brought up there thanks in part to DXVK.

    The games with workarounds in Mesa 18.2.3 are Rage, Yakuza, The Evil Within, Wolfenstein: The Old Blood, ARMA 3, and No Man's Sky. These workarounds are added to the common Mesa DRIRC for toggling certain features as opposed to driver-specific hacks.

  • AMDVLK Radeon Vulkan Driver Updated With A Slew Of Additions

    It had been more than two weeks since the last time AMD developers updated their public source trees making up the official AMDVLK Vulkan driver but fortunately that has now changed. Given the time since the last commit, there is a lot of goodies with this new AMDVLK driver refresh.

  • Intel KVMGT 2018-Q3 Released As Their Latest Open-Source GPU Virtualization Bits

    Intel developers today announced the release of KVMGT 2018-Q3 (also known as Intel GVT-g for KVM) as well as the accompany Xen hypervisor tailored XenGT 2018-Q3 update.

    These are the latest quarterly updates to the Intel technology stack for allowing GPU virtualization of their HD/UHD/Iris Graphics hardware with mediated pass-through on Linux systems. This GPU virtualization support continues working with Intel 5th Gen Core/Xeon "Broadwell" processors and newer with guest operating systems being Linux as well as Windows 7 or newer.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Tiny NanoPi Duo2 SBC offers camera connector

FriendlyElec has launched a tiny, under $20 “NanoPi Duo2” board that updates the original Duo with an Allwinner H3, Bluetooth, a camera connector, and an optional 2G carrier board. FriendlyElec has spun out a modest upgrade to last year’s $13 (previously $8) NanoPi Duo. Like the Duo, the COM-like, $19.50 NanoPi Duo2 includes two 16-pin GPIO headers with breadboard pins in a dual-in-line layout. Read more

today's leftovers

  • OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux to Exhibit Software-Defined Storage Solutions at All Things Open
  • Warning: 'Soul Calibur 6' Is Causing A Serious Problem For Linux Gamers
    The good news: right out of the box, Soul Calibur VI seems to offer decent performance on Linux via Steam Play and Proton. The bad news? The game fails to detect an online network, and then when gamers switch over to play on Windows they're finding themselves completely blocked from playing the fighter online.
  • Latte Dock, new painting is coming...
    In the video you can see the upcoming coloring mechanism of Latte's next version. Even though I am using plasma 5.14 and I love it, it is also the reason I am already expecting impatiently plasma 5.15 this January!! :) This functionality can be supported only with plasma 5.15 .
  • BGP LLGR: robust and reactive BGP sessions
    On a BGP-routed network with multiple redundant paths, we seek to achieve two goals concerning reliability: A failure on a path should quickly bring down the related BGP sessions. A common expectation is to recover in less than a second by diverting the traffic to the remaining paths. As long as a path is operational, the related BGP sessions should stay up, even under duress.
  • Measuring the speaker frequency response using the AUDMES free software GUI - nice free software
    My current home stereo is a patchwork of various pieces I got on flee markeds over the years. It is amazing what kind of equipment show up there. I've been wondering for a while if it was possible to measure how well this equipment is working together, and decided to see how far I could get using free software. After trawling the web I came across an article from DIY Audio and Video on Speaker Testing and Analysis describing how to test speakers, and it listing several software options, among them AUDio MEasurement System (AUDMES). It is the only free software system I could find focusing on measuring speakers and audio frequency response. In the process I also found an interesting article from NOVO on Understanding Speaker Specifications and Frequency Response and an article from ecoustics on Understanding Speaker Frequency Response, with a lot of information on what to look for and how to interpret the graphs. Armed with this knowledge, I set out to measure the state of my speakers. The first hurdle was that AUDMES hadn't seen a commit for 10 years and did not build with current compilers and libraries. I got in touch with its author, who no longer was spending time on the program but gave me write access to the subversion repository on Sourceforge. The end result is that now the code build on Linux and is capable of saving and loading the collected frequency response data in CSV format. The application is quite nice and flexible, and I was able to select the input and output audio interfaces independently. This made it possible to use a USB mixer as the input source, while sending output via my laptop headphone connection. I lacked the hardware and cabling to figure out a different way to get independent cabling to speakers and microphone.
  • Arm Offers Lower Cost Cortex-A5 License
    Arm is now offer a low-cost route to developing Cortex-A5 based Linux-capable ASICs for embedded Internet of Things (IoT) devices featuring advanced edge processing, with a new one-year license fee of $75,000. This fee provides access to the CPU IP and one year of design support, through Arm's DesignStart program.
  • Arm DesignStart program expands to accelerate Linux-based embedded design
    While the breadth of IoT provides endless possibilities for advanced software development, it also holds challenges for designers. In a rapidly changing and competitive market, designers need to differentiate their products and deliver enhanced designs at the lowest cost in the fastest time possible. One avenue for differentiation is “rich embedded processing”, which we define at Arm as providing an advanced level of performance and sophistication. Sometimes that includes an interactive user interface, but on the whole, it is about offering advanced capability. These products use a comprehensive set of software stacks and benefit from the breadth of ready-to-run middleware and applications available on fully featured operating systems such as Linux. Companies developing rich embedded IoT designs are now turning toward application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) to meet their specific needs.

Red Hat: OpenShift and Awards

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift 3.11 Release Update with Scott McCarty (Red Hat)
    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Scott McCarty and numerous other members of the OpenShift Product Management team gave an in-depth look at Red Hat’s OpenShift’s latest release 3.11 and some insights in to the road ahead.
  • Awards roll call: Red Hat awards, June to October 2018
    Depending on the weather in your region, it’s safe to say that the seasons are changing so it’s a good time to look back at what was a busy few months for Red Hat, especially when it came to industry awards for our technical and product leadership. In recent months, Red Hat products and technologies took home twenty awards, highlighting the breadth and depth of our product portfolio as well as the expertise that we provide to our customers. In addition, Red Hat as a company won five awards recognizing its growth and culture as a leader in the industry.
  • More advice from a judge - what it takes to win a Red Hat Innovation Award
    Last year I penned the below post to provide insight into what the judges of the Red Hat Innovation Awards are looking for when reviewing submissions. Looking back, I would give almost the identical advice again this year...maybe with a few tweaks. With all the stellar nominations that we receive, the question I often get is, “how can we make our entry standout?” There’s no magic formula for winning the Red Hat Innovation Awards, but there are things that the other judges and I look for in the entries. Overall, we’re looking for the project that tells a compelling story. It’s not just about sharing what Red Hat products and services you used, we want to hear the full narrative. What challenges did you face; how you implemented the project; and ultimately, what was the true business impact and transformation that took place? Submissions that are able to showcase how open source culture and values were key to success, or how the project is making a difference in the lives of others, are the entries that most often rise to the top.