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Quick Roundup

  • 22/05/2020 - 6:08am
    Marius Nestor
  • 20/01/2020 - 5:37am
    johnwalsh
  • 07/07/2019 - 5:40pm
    JamieCull
  • 04/07/2019 - 7:09pm
    ksanaj
  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
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    itsfoss
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    Variscite
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  • 11/01/2017 - 12:02am
    tishacrayt

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • WordPress Mobile Engineers Propose Dual Licensing Gutenberg under GPL v2.0 and MPL v2.0

    During a Q&A session at WordCamp Europe 2020 online, Matt Mullenweg mentioned that Gutenberg contributors were considering dual licensing for embedding Gutenberg in mobile apps, along with the requirement that they would need to get an agreement from all contributors. WordPress mobile engineer Maxime Biais has just published a proposal for discussion, recommending dual licensing the editor under GPL v2.0 and MPL v2.0.

    [...]

    Mobile app developers are limited by the GPL, because it requires the entire app to be distributed under the same license. The team is proposing dual licensing under MPL v2.0, a weaker copyleft license that is often considered to be more “business-friendly.” It allows users to combine the software with proprietary code. MPL v2.0 requires the source code for any changes to be available under the MPL, ensuring improvements are shared back to the community. The rest of the app can be distributed under any terms with the MPL v2.0 code included as part of a “larger work.”

  • NoSQL databases: what is MongoDB and its use cases?

    Databases like MongoDB, a NoSQL document database, are commonly used in environments where flexibility is required with big, unstructured data with ever-changing schemas. This post explains what a NoSQL database is, and provides an overview of MongoDB, its use cases and a solution for running an open source MongoDB database at scale.

  • What Cassandra users think of their NoSQL DBMS

    With the NoSQL market expected to be worth $22 Billion by 2026, big business is paying Apache Cassandra a lot of attention. While MongoDB dominates NoSQL, 52.71% to Cassandra's 9.73%, Cassandra, with its ability to deliver continuous availability, high performance, and scalability to large volumes of unstructured data, will always be a player. Now, if only there were more expert Cassandra administrators!

    A global survey of 1,404 Cassandra practitioners found a plurality thought the lack of skilled staff and the challenge of migration was blocking Cassandra's adoption. To be exact, 36% of users currently using Cassandra for mission-critical apps said that a lack of Cassandra-skilled team members was deterring its broader adoption.

    When asked what it would take for practitioners to use Cassandra for more applications and features in production, they said it needs to be "easier to migrate" and "easier to integrate." That's because "we don't have time to train a ton of developers, so that time to deploy, time to onboard, that's really key. All the other stuff, scalability, that all sounds fine," said a London-based senior Cassandra user.

    That may be in part because of those surveyed, 89% were using open-source Cassandra. If they were using DataStax, the most popular Cassandra distro, it might be a different story.

  • Olauncher gives your home screen an open-source, minimalist makeover

    Android's open, customizable nature is one of the things that attract a lot of enthusiasts to the platform. From manufacturer-specific tweaks to third-party default app replacements, there's usually a way to make your phone look and act how you choose. Olauncher is a new home screen replacement app that endeavors to bring an open-source, lightweight, and minimal setup to your phone.

    And minimal it is — there's time and date info up top, a list of apps below ... and that's it. The clock and app list can be set to left, center, or right orientations. A maximum of six app names can be displayed, but if you're the most minimal of minimalists, you can set it to show no apps at all. But wouldn't that render it useless? Not quite! By default, swiping to the left launches the camera and swiping to the right opens up the dialer, but you can customize these as you choose. A swipe up opens the full app list organized alphabetically.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Josef Strzibny: Elixir macros return AST

    Macros are a powerfull part of the Elixir language and projects such as Absinth would not even be possible without them. To start writing your macros in Elixir one has to understand one simple thing. Macro functions have to return a partial abstract syntax tree.

  • Marcin 'hrw' Juszkiewicz: From a diary of AArch64 porter — drive-by coding

    Working on AArch64 often means changing code in some projects. I did that so many times that I am unable to say where I have some commits. Such thing got a name: drive-by coding.

    [...]

    Then comes moment of looking at build errors and trying to work out some solution. Have I seen that bug before? Does it look familiar?

    If this is something new then quick Google search for error message. And checking bug reports/issues on project’s website/repo. There can be ready to use patches, information how to fix it or even some ideas why does it happen.

    If this is system call failure in some tests then I check my syscalls table are those ones handled on aarch64 and try to change code if they are not (legacy ones like open, symlink, rename).

  • Sebastian Dröge: Porting EBU R128 audio loudness analysis from C to Rust

    Over the last few weeks I ported the libebur128 C library to Rust, both with a proper Rust API as well as a 100% compatible C API.

  • Why is unauthenticated encryption insecure?

    However, there has to be a line – when does it start becoming “rolling your own”? Particularly in embedded systems, there are times when custom protocols need to be used, and developers stray into the dangerous area of cryptography.

    One of the most common mistakes we have seen is the use of unauthenticated encryption.

  • k2k20 hackathon report: Bob Beck on LibreSSL progress

    So the distilled answer, most of this was finished, reviewed, and landed at the hackathon, where I took a lot of tb@ and jsing@'s time to review it. I then spent much of my time chasing any bugs it turned up - which included some nasty ways fetchmail deals with the callback, and some issues in bluhm@'s regress tests and perl's ssleay module (which exposed a bug in how I was handling the legacy callback)

    So while not necessarily "done" (I am watching for fallout carefully) and I still have some pieces to land to expose the new api to the new validator, it is currently used internally by default in X509_validate_cert(). The result of this should be a validator that will correctly validate modern x509 chains and correctly deal with name constraints.

  • 2020.38 Council Results

    Votemaster Will Coleda has published the results of the first Raku Steering Council election. Thanks to everybody who has voted! The elected council members are (in alphabetical order of their last name):

Fedora/Oracle/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • rpminspect-1.1 released

    It has been 3 or 4 months since the last release of rpminspect. Today I release rpminspect 1.1. In addition to five new inspections, there are plenty of bug fixes and a lot of improvements against CI.

    The five new inspections include the abidiff and kmidiff inspections. Another inspection I added is the movedfiles inspection, which was requested over a year ago. Implementing it was easy once I improved the peer detection code. It’s common for files to move between subpackages, so this inspection attempts to detect and report that rather than reporting you added a file and removed a file (which is what it used to do).

    There has been more work around the configuration file handling. The last release moved to YAML for the configuration file format. This releases moves the configuration file in to /usr/share/rpminspect and out of /etc. There is also no longer a default configuration file so users can have multiple rpminspect-data packages installed and perform rpminspect runs for different products. There are some other changes within /usr/share/rpminspect which are described below.

    On the CI front, rpminspect has migrated from Travis-CI to GitHub Actions. The software is built and tested on multiple Linux distributions now to ensure portability. The GitHub Actions also run flake8, black, and shellcheck for the Python and shell code in the tree.

  • Using Volumes for Podman Container Storage on Oracle Linux 8
  • Network Configuration Files on Oracle Linux 8
  • Troubleshooting user task errors in Red Hat Process Automation Manager and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite

    I’ve been around Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite (jBPM) and Red Hat Process Automation Manager (RHPAM) for many years. Over that time, I’ve learned a lot about the lesser-known aspects of this business process management engine.

    If you are like most people, you might believe that user tasks are trivial, and learning about their details is unnecessary. Then, one day, you will find yourself troubleshooting an error like this one:

    User '[User:'admin']' was unable to execution operation 'Start' on task id 287271 due to a no 'current status' match.
    Receiving one too many similar error messages led me to learn everything that I know about user tasks, and I have decided to share my experience.

  • Red Hat brings its expo experience directly to you

    Why create a pop-up? Because virtually, we can think outside the expo floor by making an experience that’s memorable, shareable, and fun—and most importantly, useful and engaging.
    We know that our users and customers are looking for more information about enterprise open source technologies and how to use them for real-world workloads. Delivering that information in person is one of the highlights of being at Red Hat—but now, we embraced the opportunity to reach the open source community from all over the world through a first-of-its-kind online experience.

UCS 4.4-6: Sixth Point Release of UCS 4.4

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

We have released the sixth point release: UCS 4.4-6 contains bug fixes, security updates and improvements as well as new features. For example, our developers have enhanced the Self Service, the App Center and the UCS Portal. In this article I would like to offer a look behind the scenes and present the most important new features.

Read more

Tails 4.11 is out

Filed under
Security
Debian

We added a new feature of the Persistent Storage to save the settings from the Welcome Screen: language, keyboard, and additional settings.

Read more

The 10 Best Raspberry Pi Stores Available in the Market

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi is the most discussed single-board computer nowadays, which is highly applied in the development of IoT. It was made to make computing more accessible, and we can say it succeeded quite thoroughly. Now, with the emerging importance of the Pi, more and more people are getting interested in buying it and looking for the finest and authentic Raspberry Pi Stores around them. If you are one of them, let’s say you have reached the best place to get your answer!

[...]

The Pi Hut’s Raspberry Pi superstore started its journey in 2012 with selling SD cards only. Since then, they have been upgrading gradually and finally reached this point where they are regarded as #1 Raspberry Pi Store. You will find all the latest and finest Raspberry Pi accessories and add-ons.

Besides their excellent quality products, they offer fast and caring customer service. Moreover, their website provides a Raspberry Pi compatibility checker on each of the product’s page that allows you to know which product fit well with which Pi model.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Mageia (mysql-connector-java), openSUSE (chromium, curl, libqt4, and singularity), Red Hat (bash and kernel), SUSE (python-pip and python3), and Ubuntu (busybox, ceph, freeimage, libofx, libpam-tacplus, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-azure, linux-azure-4.15, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-4.15, linux-gke-4.15, linux-hwe, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-oracle, novnc, and tnef).

  • Microsoft secures backend server that leaked Bing data [Ed: "No personal user data was leaked in the incident," says ZDNet about a Microsoft security incident, just because the liars from Microsoft said so. Did ZDNet check to verify? No. Reprinting lies.]

    Microsoft has suffered a rare cyber-security lapse earlier this month when the company's IT staff accidentally left one of Bing's backend servers exposed online.

  • No security audit done on Chinese smartphones- IT ministry

    Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology, Government of India, today clarified that it has not conducted any sort of study to check if Chinese-made smartphones used in India are sending sensitive data to their country of origin.

    “Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY) has not conducted any such study,” said Minister of State Sanjay Dhotre, in response to a question by Rajya Sabha MP Vivek Tankha.

    [...]

    While the Gnu Public License, which governs the Linux Operating System, requires anyone who makes changes to the code to disclose the changes publicly, such a requirement is not there for BSD, and therefore, for Android.

    Unlike GPL, the BSD license allows any company to take the code, alter it in any way they want, and not disclose the changes to anyone.

  • No, Moving Your SSH Port Isn’t Security by Obscurity

    In short, you just made it harder for the enemy to successfully attack you by giving them a resource problem. Sure, they can check under every rock in Central Park and eventually find the package, but you’ll be done with the mission by then.

    Obscurity doesn’t apply if people know the mechanism you’re using and they simply have a resource problem. Having a known defense but a hidden key is a well-established part of good security, and it has been for millennia.

GNU/Linux-Compatible Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Raspberry Pi turns retro radio into interactive storyteller
  • Microchip graphics toolkit for Linux-on-Arm

    Called Ensemble Graphics Toolkit, it is a no-cost and royalty-fre open-source C++ suite based on the permissive Apache 2.0 open-source license.
    It works with the company’s chips, system-in-package and system-on-module products.

    “By taking advantage of underlying hardware acceleration, including graphics controllers and video decoders when available, the toolkit provides a high-performance user experience on low and mid-range graphical displays up to XGA [1,024 x 768] resolution,” according to the company. “Ensemble Graphics Toolkit and Linux can be optimised for boot times of under three seconds from cold reset that is required for applications such as automotive dashboard clusters.”

  • Intel Rocket Lake and Xe DG1 GPU now have Linux support

    Intel has updated its Compute Runtime to support its upcoming Rocket Lake desktop processors and Intel DG1 graphics based on its Xe GPU architecture. Overall, this can be seen as a sign that things are moving at a steady pace with Intel’s 11th generation core CPUs and discrete graphics.

  • Work smarter and harder!

    We’re decided to focus on how an open source smart home office looks and runs with a bit of help from the Raspberry Pi. From setting up a low-overhead video conferencing system to collaborative document editing and sharing, to more mundane smart-home control options, this is what happens when we leave Jonni to his own devices at home for six months!

    Hopefully you’ll find something that will be of genuine use around your new working-from-home home office, or at least something for which use a spare Pi!

10 Raspberry Pi alternatives for you to try out

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Hardware

While the Raspberry Pi may have kick-started the popularity of single-board computers, it is by no means the only option out there. These days, new Pi-like boards are announced on a near-monthly basis, some offering comparable specs to the latest Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, with others bumping up specs to PC-like levels or throwing machine-learning capabilities into the mix.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, you have boards that have been stripped back to their bare essentials, making them perfect for complete beginners or for DIY maker projects that don't require a lot of processing clout. These boards often carry an equally small price tag to match.

Read more

Mozilla: Firefox, Hubs and SeaMonkey

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

  • 81.0 Firefox Release
  • Firefox 81 Released With Security Fixes, PDF Viewer Enhancements

    Firefox 81 is out this morning as the newest monthly update to the Mozilla web browser.

    Firefox 81.0 brings the ability for keyboard/headset-based controls for audio/video playback in the browser, various accessibility fixes for HTML5 audio/video controls, Picture-in-Picture mode is now more accessible with icon improvements, and other video work. It also looks like a few VA-API fixes made it into this version too after the big push in Firefox 80.

  • Your Privacy and Mozilla Hubs

    At Mozilla, we believe that privacy is fundamental to a healthy internet.

    [...]

    There’s a certain amount of information that we have to process in order to provide you with the Hubs experience. For example, we receive and send to others the name and likeness of your avatar, its position in the room, and your interactions with objects in the room. If you create an account, you can store custom avatars and their names.

    We receive data about the virtual objects and avatars in a room in order to share that data with others in the room, but we don’t monitor the individual objects that are posted in a room. Users have the ability to permanently pin objects to a room, which will store them in the room until they’re deleted. Unpinned files are deleted from Mozilla’s servers after 72 hours.

    We do collect basic metrics about how many rooms are being created and how many users are in those rooms, but we don’t tie that data to specific rooms or users. What we don’t do is collect or store any data without the user's explicit consent.

    [...]

    We will never perform user monitoring or deep tracking, particularly using VR data sources like gaze-tracking. We will continue to minimize the personal data we collect, and when we do need to collect data, we will invest in privacy preserving solutions like differential privacy.

  • [PCLinuxOS] Seamonkey updated to 2.53.4

    SeaMonkey is a free and open-source Internet suite. It is the continuation of the former Mozilla Application Suite, based on the same source code, which itself grew out of Netscape Communicator and formed the base of Netscape 6 and Netscape 7.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Space Cadet is a punishing two-button neon-infused arcade experience

    Love a challenge? Enjoy some of the classic neon arcade shoot 'em up experiences? You should definitely take a look over at Space Cadet then.

    It's a super-simple game mechanically and yet it's also seriously good too. Trapped inside some sort of arena, presumably done to keep the gameplay tight and focused, and abandoned by your crew during a mining operation - you're operating a space ship by switching between different systems with one button and activating them with another. Only having two buttons really makes it challenging and hilariously difficult too.

  • In the 2D survival game Underlings, you're a monster trying to live a peaceful life

    Underlings is a new Early Access 2D survival game where the protagonist is a former monster, trying to get away from their past life and start fresh.

    Set in a ruthless world where everything is trying to kill you, the bosses of the underworld don't seem to be too pleased at you wanting the simple life. It mixes in exploration, mining, crafting, farming, base building and more into an experience that blends together all of that with daily survival as it sounds like you're often raided.

  • Chuck's Challenge 3D gets a huge 2020 revamp as a free upgrade out now

    Chuck's Challenge 3D 2020 is out now, as a free update and a major revamp to the tile-based puzzle game from the creator of the classic Chip's Challenge.

    What is it? A fiendishly addictive puzzler that’s packed with features that will tease the brain and challenge the fingers. It also comes with a level editor that lets you upload and share your levels for everyone to play and rate, all from within the game. From what Niffler Ltd said about it: "The game walks the player through the evolution of gaming: move from A to B, collect items, the red key opens the red door, and much more. But, like Lego, knowing what each piece does is only the beginning of the fun, as players can also create and share their own levels using a simple paint-style interface and seamless cloud storage."

    [...]

    It comes with over 150 levels made by the developer and with such awesome dedication so long after release, along with it supporting Linux they're a developer worth giving over your monies to.

  • Futuristic, mysterious, full of physics and circuits - puzzle game The Long Gate is out

    Developer David Shaw has now released The Long Gate, a thoroughly mysterious puzzle game full of quantum physics and circuits set up as puzzles.

    With puzzles that can be completed in whatever order you find them, Shaw worked with a quantum computing science company called D-Wave Systems to build them and make sure the quantum theory used is factual and achievable. The result is a puzzle game with a very interesting idea - if you can grasp the mechanics and if you love tinkering with wires.

  • Problems for Linux Gaming

    Huge news about Microsoft just hit the market and how it affects Linux Gaming.

  • Microsoft to Acquire Bethesda Softworks for $7.5 Billion

    Through the deal to purchase ZeniMax Media, the Xbox maker will become the owner of one of the largest private game developers and publishers, known for making such franchises as Fallout, Doom and The Elder Scrolls.

    Microsoft cited its focus on growing cloud gaming service Xbox Game Pass, which has 15 million subscribers, as one motivation for the deal. Bethesda games, including Fallout 76, are already available on the service. More will be added to Game Pass and eventually the publishers new releases, including upcoming space epic Starfield, will be available on the service the same day the launch on Xboxes and PCs.

  • Microsoft to Buy Bethesda for $7.5 Billion to Boost Xbox

    Bethesda is the publisher of games like The Elder Scrolls, Doom and Fallout and also has at least two titles slated for debut next year. ZeniMax, based in Rockville, Maryland, owns several other studios across the globe, giving Microsoft’s Xbox business a much-needed infusion of titles and game developers. It’s one of the biggest privately held game companies with 2,300 employees worldwide, Microsoft said. The latest in the Elder Scrolls series has sold more than 20 million copies, making it among the top-selling games of all time.

  • Why Microsoft bought Bethesda for $7.5 billion

    Microsoft may not necessarily care about exclusivity anymore, but it still needs studios. First-party developers are the lifeblood of game publishers because they allow them to control the cadence of major releases and better manage budgets and cross-franchise resources like game engines and creative talent. Most important to Microsoft right now, however, is having the final say on distribution. By owning a studio, Microsoft gets to decide where and for how much the game is sold, including giving it away for free as part of a subscription service.

Lightweight Puppy Linux 9.5 Released, Based On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Puppy Linux is a very small and lightning fast Ubuntu-based operating system. If you ever search for the best lightweight Linux distros, you would definitely find Puppy Linux on the list.

Now, after more than one and a half years, the Puppy Linux team has announced a new version, Puppy Linux 9.5, aka, Fossapup64 9.5. The latest Puppy 9.5 is also the first release based on the current long-term Ubuntu 20.04 “Focal Fossa.”

Read more

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Improved QML Support in Qt for Python 6.0

    Since the initial port of PySide to Qt5 (a.k.a PySide2), the interaction with QML was on the list of features we wanted to fully support in our set of bindings, due to the popularity of QML.

    With the first official release 5.12, we had cover many use cases for the QML and Python interaction, but also we left out a couple of use cases that were really required by our community. Now that we are developing new features and improvements for Qt6, we wanted to address most of them.

  • Live-coding a music synthesizer

    After so much work and waiting, the video of my EuroPython talk is finally released!

    This is a fun live-coding session using NumPy and SoundDevice. The goal of this talk is to make the computer produce realistic-sounding instrument sounds, using nothing but math.

  • Which is better Python or C++?

    Programming Languages are tools. Tools selection comes after deciding what you want to do. Asking this question means that you are beginner and don’t know which programming language to learn. So In this case Selecting Python is better

    when you start to learn programming. Python is simple but powerful, You will learn about Abstraction and how to solve your problems quickly.

    When you start programming using a simple and very productive language like Python you will love it because you will make big progress in little time and you will face little problems.

    After you learn programming this way (The simple way) you will beat the fear of programming, You already learn how to write programs, how to debug them, and how to create something useful. Later you may face limitations in the language

    [...]

    Later you can develop complete projects in C or C++. Your knowledge in Python will help you during learning C or C++. What you will find different is just Static Typing, Memory Management and some other simple concepts.

  • Firebird driver for Python 3– release 0.8.0

    The driver is no longer beta, and is now considered as stable for Firebird 3.0 (support for Firebird 4 is still evolving till final release). Documentation is now complete.

  • Strftime Python

    In this post, we will learn about strftime() method from Python datetime package.

    The strftime converts date object to a string date.

System76 announce more Linux laptop models get open source firmware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

System76, the Pop!_OS Linux distribution maker and hardware vendor for laptops, desktops and servers has announced another open source firmware push.

Announced on Twitter, the official account mentioned that the Gazelle and the Adder WS models are joining the ranks and if you own them you can switch them over to their open source firmware right now. Not only that, their Darter Pro laptop model will get an automatic update to move it over to their open source EC (Embedded Controller) firmware. You can see here how to move your devices over.

Founder and CEO of System76, Carl Richell, announced on Twitter: "I highly recommend switching to System76 Open Firmware if you have one of these models. Not only is your firmware largely liberated from proprietary code, your laptop will boot faster and you'll start seeing integrations between hardware (through this firmware) and Pop!_OS.".

Read more

Games: Songs of Syx, Super Mario 64 and Stadia

Filed under
Gaming
  • Fantasy grand strategy city-builder Songs of Syx is out in Early Access

    As one of the most promising indie games this year, Songs of Syx has properly entered Early Access on Steam so you can try your hand at city-building with a grand strategy theme.

    It's hard to fully grasp the scope of it right now but it's big. You start off as an insignificant colony and build, scheme, and fight your way towards a metropolis and empire. Funded with a successful Kickstarter campaign that ended back in May 2020 with about £23K from over 800 backers. As they said it would, Linux support is wired up and ready right away.

  • You can now play Super Mario 64 natively on Android, no emulator required

    Forget Super Mario 3D All-Stars. You can now play Super Mario 64 on your Android phone without the need for an emulator.

    The game now has an unofficial native Android port thanks to XDA member VDavid003. In the summer of 2019, Super Mario 64 was successfully decompiled and translated into human-readable C code by a team known simply as a “group of talented individuals.” This code has been available on GitHub for a little over a year at this point, and VDavid003 took this code to create the tools needed to compile the game for Android.

    [...]

    VDavid003 has created a repo containing everything needed to compile the game on a Windows or Linux PC, which can then be sideloaded as an APK to an Android device.

  • Stadia pushing more indie games with Stadia Makers, PUBG dropping keyboard and mouse queue

    Google has announced another wave of indie games are confirmed for Stadia, their game streaming service powered by Linux and Vulkan.

    This is all part of the previously announced Stadia Makers program back in March during their Google for Games Keynote, where Google will directly support smaller teams using the Unity game engine to bring them to Stadia. As a result, another 7 have been announced to release at various dates.

TechNexion Unveils EDM and AXON SoM’s Powered by NXP i.MX8M Plus SoC

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux

The company offers standard support for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Linux-built Yocto Project, and Android 10, as well as extended support for FreeRTOS. If it feels like you’ve seen EDM-G-IMX8M-PLUS module before it’s because it should be the one found in the upcoming Wandboard 8MPLUS SBC.

There’s will be other development kits based on existing AXON/EDM baseboards including AXON-PI Raspberry Pi-like starter board, or the full-featured AXON-WIZARD and EDM-WIZARD evaluation boards. Marcel vandenHeuvel, TechNexion’s CEO, gives an overview of the AXON i.MX8M Plus modules and baseboard, and shows a Yocto 3.0 Linux demo with dual displays.

Read more

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Stable Kernels: 5.8.11, 5.4.67, 4.19.147, 4.14.199, 4.9.237, and 4.4.237

I'm announcing the release of the 5.8.11 kernel.

All users of the 5.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.8.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.4.67 Linux 4.19.147 Linux 4.14.199 Linux 4.9.237 Linux 4.4.237

today's howtos