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About Tux Machines

Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Understanding Echo, Cat and Add/Append

  • Working with shortcuts in Linux (Ubuntu)
  • Abusing your deb package manager
  • Use Ubuntu Live CD to Backup Files from Your Dead Windows Computer
  • Ten keyboard shortcuts to improve Linux
  • Useful Shortcut Keys In Ubuntu
  • DNS Survivial Guide
  • Atheros AR 5007 EG on openSUSE 11.0
  • Introduction to vi editor in Linux and Unix system

Test drive OpenOffice.org 3.0

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OOo

tectonic.co.za: OpenOffice.org 3.0, the next major release of the open source office suite, is scheduled to be released in September. Which means that it is pretty much guaranteed to be included in the next release of Ubuntu 8.10, Mandriva 2009 and Fedora 10. Until then it is easy enough to test out the beta. OpenOffice 3.0 has a number of new features.

Finding the Fastest Filesystem

Filed under
Linux

gus3.typepad.com: Part of my "economic stimulus check" went to a 500GB SATA drive. I quickly settled on one goal: find the fastest journaling filesystem (FS) for my SLAMD64 dual-core computer, with 2G of memory. My testing focused on three main areas: filesystem, disk I/O scheduler, and CPU speed.

GNOME 3.0 officially announced... and explained

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Software

arstechnica.com: At the recent GNOME User and Developer European Conference (GUADEC), the GNOME release team announced a proposal for developing the next major iteration of the open source desktop environment. The plan offers a long-term strategy for moving GNOME development forward and defining future goals for the desktop.

Desktop Distros

As a long time user of Linux, and reader of Linux Magazines, Websites and Blogs, many see the current Linux situation as being a dawn of a new horizon. Essentially the release of the EEE PC, the timely release of Vista and Ubuntu have all kick started the “Linux Revolution” for the Linux desktop.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 261

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: KDE4: A Fork in the Road, with No Clear Direction?

  • News: Gentoo's False Start, Debian Day 2008, openSUSE Build Service 1.0
  • Released last week: GoblinX 2.7, Absolute Linux 12.1.02
  • Upcoming releases: Granular Linux 1.0, sidux 2008-03
  • Reviewed last week: SliTaz GNU/Linux 1.0, Foresight Linux 2.0.2.1, Puppy Linux 4.00
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Asus blames lack of Linux Eee PCs on Atom hold-ups

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Asus has blamed Intel not Microsoft for the apparent absence of the Atom-based Eee PC 901 from UK suppliers' shelves.

When "Supported" Doesn't Equal "Fully Functional"

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: As your experience in Linux grows, you learn one thing: don’t buy new hardware or peripherals without checking whether it’s supported by your favorite distribution. It saves both money and disappointments. I wanted to buy a decent mediaplayer. One of the players that had both positive reviews and a strong indication of Linux support was the Creative Zen Vision:M.

In Praise of Modularity

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Linux

computerworlduk.com: One of Linus Torvalds' greatest contributions to free software – and, indeed, to software in general – came about purely by chance. As he told me back in 1996, as he reflected on how the Linux kernel had come about and grown:

Untangle gateway continues to impress in open source gateways

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently, I have been evaluating various gateways for Internet facing devices for the small office or home office (SOHO) over the last few weeks. This functionality in this space continues to impress me, and the best part is that a lot of it is available for free.

KDE loses stalwart, Uwe Thiem

Filed under
KDE
Obits

tectonic.co.za: KDE stalwart and African developer Uwe Thiem passed away on Friday afternoon. Uwe was a long-standing developer of KDE and an ardent advocate of free and open source software.

today's howtos & leftovers

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Broadcom Wireless in OpenSUSE 11.0

  • Top Ten Processes Watcher
  • Killing off Ubuntu’s insane update manager
  • Installing Gentoo 2008.0 Live CD
  • Turn off Firefox 3’s “awesome bar”
  • Howto Check For Linux Rootkits
  • MIDI support in OpenSUSE 11.0 w/ Gstreamer
  • Opensolaris and Ubuntu Dual boot
  • Disk Monitoring and reporting Utilities in linux

  • MP3 Tag Editing in Linux
  • Linux in the real world - in the wild
  • DRM File Restructuring For Linux 2.6.27
  • Opinion needed for the KDE menu of mandriva 2009.0
  • Ubuntu vs Mac OS Scorecard
  • Goodbye Kubuntu, Hello OpenSUSE

gOS Space: OSX like operating system without Apple

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Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: I’ve been a fan of gOS for a while now. I’ve been running their Rocket release for about a year. It’s based on Ubuntu and has the benefit of pre-installed Enlightenment. It’s solid, runs well on lower-end hardware, and…it’s Enlightenment (what more do you want?)

KDevelop 4: A New Era

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Software

kdedevelopers.org: Like KDE4, KDevelop has seen much work on essential internal mechanisms (much like the pillars of KDE), the power of which will become evident over the next year or so. Progress has been great recently. In today's blog I'll concentrate on language support.

Linux 2.6.26

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Linux

lkml.org: So it's been almost three months since 2.6.25 (87 days to be exact, I think), making this a longer-than-usual release cycle. Or maybe it just feels that way, and we're always getting close to three months these days. But it's out there now.

Review: Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 2

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Ubuntu

headshotgamer.com: These early snapshots are important to the Linux gaming community. The reason for this is simple; Gamers are hardware junkies. Newer kernels support newer hardware and the newer the distro, the newer the packages.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #99

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 99 for the weeks July 6th - July 12th, 2008 is now available. In this issue we cover: special 100th issue of the UWN next week, Intrepid Alpha 2 released, Ubuntu stats, new Kubuntu website, Ubuntu in US retailers, and much, much more!

email-reminder: Never forget a birthday or an anniversary again

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Email-Reminder is a simple tool to define events for which you want to receive a reminder by email. These reminders (sent out daily by a small cronjob) can be either on the day of the event and/or a few days beforehand.

Linux based virtualisation – the way to save money and go green

itwire.com: Virtualisation is a technology that can work wonders: provide a testing environment, enhance your processing power, consolidate your computing resources, decrease running costs, preserve legacy apps and more! Here’s how virtualisation can benefit you and why the Linux route really beats out the competition.

Linux not essential to Eee PC success: ASUS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

apcmag.com: Penguin-powered mini notebooks are selling like hotcakes. But will they finally bring Linux into the mainstream? Don’t count on it.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers/Networks

  • Rackspace to be Acquired for $4.3B
    Rackspace announced that it is being acquired in an all-cash deal valued at $4.3B. Pending regulatory anti-trust approval, the firm will be taken private by a group of investors led by Apollo Global Management in Q4 of 2016. This valuation equates to a price of $32/share. The 38% premium cited in the announcement is calculated against a base share price from August 3, as the news about the pending acquisition began increasing the company stock price as early as August 4. For historical context, this valuation falls considerably below the company’s peak market capitalization in January 2013 when Rackspace was worth $10.9B. This means that the company’s current valuation – including the premium – is less than 40% of what it was at its highest point.
  • More on Open Source Tools for Data Science
    Open source tools are having a transformative impact on the world of data science. In a recent guest post here on OStatic, Databricks' Kavitha Mariappan (shown here), who is Vice President of Marketing, discussed some of the most powerful open source solutions for use in the data science arena. Databricks was founded by the creators of the popular open source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, which is itself transforming data science. Here are some other open source tools in this arena to know about. As Mariappan wrote: "Apache Spark, a project of the Apache Software Foundation, is an open source platform for distributed in-memory data processing. Spark supports complete data science pipelines with libraries that run on the Spark engine, including Spark SQL, Spark Streaming, Spark MLlib and GraphX. Spark SQL supports operations with structured data, such as queries, filters, joins, and selects. In Spark 2.0, released in July 2016, Spark SQL comprehensively supports the SQL 2003 standard, so users with experience working with SQL on relational databases can learn how to work with Spark quickly."
  • SDN, open source nexus to accelerate service creation
    What's new in the SDN blog world? One expert says SDN advancements will be accelerated, thanks to SDN and open source convergence, while another points out the influence SDN has in the cloud industry.
  • Platform9 & ZeroStack Make OpenStack a Little More VMware-Friendly
    Platform9 and ZeroStack are adding VMware high availability to their prefab cloud offerings, part of the ongoing effort to make OpenStack better accepted by enterprises. OpenStack is a platform, an archipelago of open source projects that help you run a cloud. But some assembly is required. Both Platform9 and ZeroStack are operating on the theory that OpenStack will better succeed if it’s turned into more of a shrink-wrapped product.
  • Putting Ops Back in DevOps
    What Agile means to your typical operations staff member is, “More junk coming faster that I will get blamed for when it breaks.” There always is tension between development and operations when something goes south. Developers are sure the code worked on their machine; therefore, if it does not work in some other environment, operations must have changed something that made it break. Operations sees the same code perform differently on the same machine with the same config, which means if something broke, the most recent change must have caused it … i.e. the code did it. The finger-pointing squabbles are epic (no pun intended). So how do we get Ops folks interested in DevOps without promising them only a quantum order of magnitude more problems—and delivered faster?
  • Cloud chronicles
    How open-source software and cloud computing have set up the IT industry for a once-in-a-generation battle

KDE and Qt

GNOME News

  • Fresh From the Oven: GNOME Pie 0.6.9 Released
    For a slice of something this weekend you might want to check out the latest update to GNOME Pie, the circular app launcher for Linux desktops.
  • GUADEC 2016 and the Butterfly Effect
  • GUADEC 2016 Notes
    I’m back from GUADEC and wanted to share a few thoughts on the conference itself and the post-conference hackfest days. All the talks including the opening and closing sessions and the GNOME Foundation AGM are available online. Big thanks goes to the organization team for making this possible.

Security News

  • Thursday's security updates
  • Priorities in security
  • How Core Infrastructure Initiative Aims to Secure the Internet
    In the aftermath of the Heartbleed vulnerability's emergence in 2014, the Linux Foundation created the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII)to help prevent that type of issue from recurring. Two years later, the Linux Foundation has tasked its newly minted CTO, Nicko van Someren, to help lead the effort and push it forward. CII has multiple efforts under way already to help improve open-source security. Those efforts include directly funding developers to work on security, a badging program that promotes security practices and an audit of code to help identify vulnerable code bases that might need help. In a video interview with eWEEKat the LinuxCon conference here, Van Someren detailed why he joined the Linux Foundation and what he hopes to achieve.
  • Certificate Authority Gave Out Certs For GitHub To Someone Who Just Had A GitHub Account
    For many years now, we've talked about the many different problems today's web security system has based on the model of security certificates issued by Certificate Authorities. All you need is a bad Certificate Authority be trusted and a lot of bad stuff can happen. And it appears we've got yet another example. A message on Mozilla's security policy mailing list notes that a free certificate authority named WoSign appeared to be doing some pretty bad stuff, including handing out certificates for a base domain if someone merely had control over a subdomain. This was discovered by accident, but then tested on GitHub... and it worked.