Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 527 srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 1:54pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 1:53pm
Story No One Knows What the Firefox Logo is srlinuxx 29/09/2013 - 5:50pm
Story Is Slackware Right For You? srlinuxx 29/09/2013 - 3:46pm
Story Ryan Gordon: Linux Viable Gaming Platform srlinuxx 28/09/2013 - 7:43pm
Story Semplice 5 review – High Hopes srlinuxx 28/09/2013 - 6:45am
Story So I heard you want to try Linux srlinuxx 28/09/2013 - 6:44am
Story Ubuntu 13.10 Final Beta released srlinuxx 28/09/2013 - 6:42am
Story "Free Unix!" srlinuxx 27/09/2013 - 9:10pm
Story The secret to Linux is hardware srlinuxx 27/09/2013 - 7:54pm

KDE 4.1 RC1 Release Announcement

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE Community today released the Release Candidate for KDE 4.1. This release will is the last milestone towards KDE 4.1 due for final release on July 29th 2008, six months after the release of KDE 4.0.

Persistent Configuration Options For X.Org Drivers

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: In recent times, the xorg.conf (or formerly, XFree86.conf) file once used for configuring all static X-related server options has been shrinking in size. Thanks to more reliable EDID (Extended Display Identification Data) on LCD panels, it's generally no longer needed to manually specify mode-lines within this X.Org configuration file.

Apple sues clone maker Psystar

Filed under
Mac
Legal

cnet.com: Apple has sued Psystar, the company that for months has been selling the Open Computer, a Mac clone. Of course, if anything, the surprising thing is not that Apple is suing Psystar, but what took them this long?

Myah OS: Not quite ready

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Myah OS is a desktop-oriented distribution built from the ground up around a custom package manager. When things go right, it has the potential to be an easy to use, simplistic deskop operating system. As you will see, however, not everything always goes right.

Automate backups on Linux

Filed under
News

The loss of critical data can prove devastating. If you use Linux, you already have access to extremely powerful tools for creating custom backup solutions. The solutions in this article can help you perform simple to more advanced and secure network backups using open source tools that are part of nearly every Linux distribution.

Evidence mounts for August Eee PC carnage with $299 Dell E launch

Filed under
Hardware

digitimes.com & engadget.com: Dell is planning to introduce a low-cost notebook in August to join the low-cost notebook market, according to the market sources. The notebook will be manufactured by Compal Electronics, according to the sources.

An Early Look At OpenSolaris 2008.11

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: Over the weekend we had posted our synopsis of Solaris Express Community Edition Build 93, which brings a great deal of needed changes to the Solaris Nevada code-base in order to bring its packages up-to-date. While OpenSolaris 2008.05 is only two months old, work at Sun is already underway in preparing for the second OpenSolaris release, which will be known as OpenSolaris 2008.11.

A Reader’s Guide to the Red Hat/Firestar Settlement

Filed under
Linux
Legal

redhat.com: Last month, we announced that Red Hat had settled a patent infringement case with an agreement that was significant in fashioning a new model for protection for the open source community. We demonstrated that it is possible to satisfy the letter and spirit of GPL licensing in resolving patent litigation.

Linux guru? then switch to Arch Linux!

Filed under
Linux

antonywilliams.com: It's official, I've ditched Debian (and Ubuntu) completely. All my computers are now running Arch Linux. Why did I switch? It's more stable, faster, updated more frequently and more customisable. Let me explain some of the main differences.

Too many Linux distributions?

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: That’s one you often hear, right? There are too many Linux distributions, and that’s a problem. To some people, who then feel compelled to blog about it. Most of the times, the reasons stated are confusion for new Linux users, and lack of a unified install method for all Linuxes.

Benchmarking hardware RAID vs. Linux kernel software RAID

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Want to get an idea of what speed advantage adding an expensive hardware RAID card to your new server is likely to give you? You can benchmark the performance difference between running a RAID using the Linux kernel software RAID and a hardware RAID card. My own tests of the two alternatives yielded some interesting results.

The Value of Free

Filed under
OSS

goodcomputing.blogspot: How do you put a value on the products created through open source? Do you consider all the time spent crafting quality software? Take into account your own effort in advocating its use? Charge for packaging and a profit margin? How, exactly, would Best Buy have come to the conclusion that Ubuntu Linux is worth $19.99? I think the answer is fairly simple: they guessed.

Dang, Darn, Damn Small Linux!

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've been looking at a very interesting variant of Linux called Damn Small Linux. Its 3 major contributors have basically taken a minimalist approach to Linux and have created a system that can provide a basic desktop running on an OS that's right around 50 Megabytes.

First few days with Mandriva 2009.0

Filed under
MDV

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: With the first few days (and couple of hundred updates) under the belt I can say a little bit more about my first impressions with the Alpha 2 release of Mandriva 2009. I started last Sunday and have been using it pretty much as the default since.

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • In Memory of Uwe Thiem

  • My Perfect Desktop: Kubuntu KDE 4
  • My kid hates Linux
  • The new and improved Ubuntu QA
  • Problems with encrypted networks in Fedora
  • If you use Linux, you MUST try gLabels
  • 2.6.26 at last
  • Brasero 0.8.0 gets cover editor, new plugin and much more
  • Edimax EW-7728In 802.11n (RaLink rt2860) with Linux 2.6.26

  • Tweaking the Eee PC part 3
  • Backup GMAIL with FetchMail
  • Use Vim As A Syntax Highlighting Pager
  • Using SFDISK to backup your partition table
  • Doom3 and Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Fix
  • Screencasting from Linux/Ubuntu
  • Converting Binary Numbers To Decimal The Hard Way On Linux Or Unix

Amarok 2 alpha 1 looking strong

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The first alpha release of Amarok 2 was made available for download last week. The popular open-source music player is undergoing a significant transformation and receiving a highly anticipated update for KDE 4.

Malware on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Security

[M]alware includes not just virii, but worms, trojans and root-kits. These known and widely available tools are not the only options available to intruders either. GNU/Linux users should not have any false sense of security just based on the fact that viruses designed for exclusively for windows won't run on GNU/Linux.

Flaws found in BSD, Linux software updaters

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: The software update mechanisms used by most BSD and Linux operating systems can be tricked into installing buggy or known-to-be-compromised software on users' systems, creating serious security risks, according to new research.

An introduction to Wubi

Filed under
Software

technologytales.com: The Toshiba laptop that I acquired at the start of the year is a Windows Vista box and it isn’t something with which I want to play too roughly because the OS came pre-installed on it. I still want to continue to see how Vista goes at close quarters so removing it to put Ubuntu or some other Linux distribution on there wasn’t ever going to be an option.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more