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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:49am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:43am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:43am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:35am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:31am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:26am
Story LibreOffice 5.0 to Bring Better Support for Special Scientific Formats Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 9:42am
Story Open source software is the only way to keep up Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 9:40am
Story Following Debian's GNU/Hurd in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 9:17am

You Say Linux, I Say GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: The older I get, the more certain I am that most discussions consist of arguing over half-truths. In fact, the more strongly everyone argues, the more likely that nobody has the complete truth. And nowhere does these hard-won truisms seem more accurate than in the age-old argument over whether the operating system we all live by should be called Linux or GNU/Linux.

Put your knowledge where your mouth is.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I get it, I get it. Your a fan boy, or fan person to be politically correct. As far as I am concerned it is everyones right and privilege to be able to express their beliefs. I also think that if somebody is going to make a statement then they should be able to back it up.

When GNOME Met KDE: Interview Stormy Peters

Filed under
Interviews

linuxinsider.com: Last year, the GNOME Foundation began hosting summits for developers alongside another desktop environment community: KDE. "In our meeting with the KDE conference, we're trying to cooperate in our common goal of providing a free desktop," said Stormy Peters.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Nokia to use Linux for flagship N-series phones
  • Glippy - Simple clipboard manager with image support
  • Low power Linux: wattOS R2 released
  • South Park Tux Wallpaper
  • NVIDIA promotes 256.35 to official release
  • Open source: inalienable right or company prerogative?
  • The Immortality of Open Source Projects
  • Introduction to Unity Launcher
  • Red Hat Linux and its close relationship with Microsoft?
  • New GNOME Foundation Conference Speaker Guidelines
  • Seeks delivers new search engine paradigm
  • Ubuntu: Harder to Use, or Just Harder to Spell?
  • LinuxCrazy Podcast 78 Gentoo Screenshots + IRC Basics
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 2 Episode 11

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Vlookup() (or Hlookup()) in OpenOffice.org Calc
  • Perl Exporter Tutorial with Examples
  • Vinagre remote desktop connection for Linux
  • Device not managed in Ubuntu 10.04?
  • Delete SSH Keys
  • Install Linux Mint on Windows
  • gentoo + youtube – flash + mplayer
  • Ubuntu Lucid Lynx Tweaks
  • Guerrilla Tactics to Force Screen Mode in Ubuntu

Mozilla: Our browser will not run native code

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla vice president of products Jay Sullivan says that unlike Google, the open source outfit has no intention of bundling Firefox with Adobe Flash —– or with a plug-in that runs native code inside the browser. Mozilla, Sullivan says, believes that the future of online applications lies with web standards, including HTML5.

The myth of Arch Linux and the i586

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Jared asked the right question yesterday, when I proclaimed I had Arch Linux running on a Pentium MMX machine. How does a distro cut to fit the i686 generation downscale to an i586?

Ubuntu 10.04 Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linusearch.com: I have been keeping an eye on Ubuntu for a long time. The operating system itself has put out a lack luster performance on previous installs. In the past each time I had installed Ubuntu there was always a show stopper of some sort.

Is the FLOSS Community Shooting Itself In the Foot?

Filed under
OSS

g33q.co.za: Recently my blog attracted a lot of attention from readers who are more critical of FLOSS, and Linux in particular, than my regular readership. Naturally a long discussion erupted where critiques and defenses of various positions and opinions and how stuff works where flung to and fro.

“Kiddie” Linux distros

Filed under
Linux

robinzrants.wordpress: But most of the grownup Linux users I know (and I’d bet the majority of all Linux users of any age) do use the so-called “kiddie” distros because they’re not into running the operating system, they just want to run applications.

Nautilus Elementary Simplifies File Browsing

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Nautilus, the default file manager in Gnome-based Linux operating systems such as Ubuntu and Fedora, isn’t exactly pretty to look at. In fact at times it’s downright confusing. This is why a group of coders have taken Nautilus’ lack of an overhaul into their own hands. The project, called Nautilus Elementary.

Group policy for Unix

theregister.co.uk: I wanted to compare Unix GPO setups to Microsoft’s Active Directory (AD) and Novell’s offerings, but I find that all the really good ones don’t so much “compare” to these directory services as “integrate with them.” The comparisons that can be made are largely “what kinds of things can I manage via GPO on Unix systems?”

Performing Image Magic with ImageMagick

Filed under
Software
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: It can be used from the command line for quick needs or built into a more complex software suite. This guide will cover some of the most “magical” features of ImageMagick and provide examples of how to use it to solve everyday tasks.

A Five-Way Linux Distribution Comparison In 2010

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With many Linux distributions receiving major updates in recent weeks and months we have carried out a five-way Linux distribution comparison of openSUSE, Ubuntu, Fedora, PCLinuxOS, and Arch Linux. We have quite a number of tests comparing the 32-bit performance of these popular Linux distributions on older PC hardware.

ownCloud 1.0 is here

Filed under
Software

blog.karlitschek.de: ownCloud is a central place where you can store your files and documents. You don´t have to upload your personal data to central closed services like Google Docs, Dropbox or Ubuntu One. All the data is under your own control.

Top 10 Cursors For X Window System

Filed under
Software

linuxnov.com: Cool Cursors collection for X 11 window system, including animated cursors for different installed applications, some of those cursors will look really good for dark themes, and bright themes.

Capturing screen shots and program interaction on UNIX and Linux systems

Filed under
Linux

Modern UNIX systems provide a number of different tools to capture the text-oriented interaction between a user and a specific program and to capture graphical screens and single windows. This article focuses on different ways to keep a record of the interaction between a user and a command-line application.

Break your Ubuntu Addiction: Three Strong Distros

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: No one can make the claim that Ubuntu isn't becoming the de facto Linux distro out there in the world today. Sadly, there is also a problem with watching Linux being tied to a single experience. Choice goes right out the window. So thankfully, despite Ubuntu's success, there are some fantastic alternatives out there that fit the needs of most people.

Attack of the Cosmic Rays

Filed under
Hardware

blog.ksplice.com: RAM in modern computers is susceptible to occasional random bit flips due to various sources of noise, most commonly high-energy cosmic rays. A few weeks ago, though, I encountered some bizarre behavior on my desktop, that honestly just didn’t make sense.

NetworkManager will drive people away from GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: One of the great plus points about running GNU/Linux used to be the continuous process of improvement going on - and the fact that one did not have to wait very long to sample those improvements if one wished to do so. But in recent times, given the great push to make everything running on GNU/Linux graphically-oriented, that seems to have changed.

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More in Tux Machines

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers