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Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AMDKFD Driver Still Evolving For Open-Source HSA On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2014 - 7:40pm
Story Tyler Livingston is one of the Licensing Team's summer intern Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2014 - 7:30pm
Story Is PHP 6 or PHP 7 Next? Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2014 - 7:21pm
Story Linux 3.16-rc6 From: Linus Torvalds Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2014 - 6:51pm
Story Chromebook Gains, Microsoft Worries Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2014 - 3:47pm
Story Can Linux speed in-car systems? Software may reduce development time, costs Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2014 - 4:32am
Story SAILFISH OS HARDWARE ADAPTATION DEV KIT RELEASE 1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 21/07/2014 - 2:27am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2014 - 9:49pm
Story GTK+ 3.13.4 Features a Much Improved Adwaita Theme Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2014 - 9:13pm

Intro to V4L2

Filed under
Software

linuxdevices.com: This articles describes the Linux's V4L2 (Video for Linux 2) interface, along with the first steps toward developing a device driver that uses the interface. It is based on Linux 2.6.28, and may not apply to other kernel versions.

The Advantages Of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

seogadget.co.uk: Bob Smiley left a fantastic comment on my blog a few days back. The comment was so rich, detailed and lengthy that it justifies a blog post all on its own. So, Bob Smiley summarises the advantages of Ubuntu.

The Linux Leap of Faith

Filed under
Linux

mr-oss.com: It is easy to sit on the Linux bandwagon and shout about how running Linux could solve all your problems. It's also easy to see that this just isn't really true.

The Application Installation Situation on Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux

blog.ibeentoubuntu: Installing apps under most distributions is rather simple. When it's not simple, though, it becomes a lot more difficult. Easy is dead easy. Everything else is pretty difficult.

Use The Tools

Filed under
Linux

pthree.org: When I taught Linux system administrators, I would go through a series of rules, and rule #1 was always: Whenever you’re editing config files, and a tool exists to make the change, use the tool instead of editing the config by hand.

Life Without Proprietary Software: Is It Possible?

Filed under
OSS

workswithu.com: Someone on the Ubuntu forums started an interesting thread today asking, “Can you manage to use only free software on your pc?“ It got me thinking about my dependency on proprietary software, and whether I’d ever really be able to get it out of my life entirely.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux Gaining Strength In Downturn

  • PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Bounces Back with a Bang
  • Schools to benefit from £30m open source project, first in UK
  • Famous firsts: Wireless
  • 1 In 3 IT Shops Uses Combo Proprietary, Open Source Software
  • Open Sources Episode 8 -- obey your Puppet master
  • Buying a netbook Linux vs. Windows XP
  • VirtualBox 2.1.4
  • Fancy Schmancy or Fine and Functional?
  • Ubuntu OpenOffice.org using gvfs fuse now
  • Rethinking OSS business model classifications
  • PC moment for open source may lack profit
  • FOSS Debates, Part 2: Standard Deviations
  • OOo Compare: Inadequate
  • VDPAU + OpenGL 3.0 On Gallium3D This Summer?
  • Shining Light on Why Microsoft Loves LAMP to Death
  • Finland warms up to Open Source for Public Adminstration
  • Unix and Linux Cartoons For The Weekend
  • Debian Project updates Package Policy
  • iPhone suffers as Android buoys Linux cause
  • Opera Turbo Labs release
  • 10 Extreme Biases You Must Acquire When Switching to Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • FFMPEG-0.5 Compile for Mandriva 2009.0

  • last and history
  • Bash Shell Temporarily Disable an Alias
  • Easy Linux Log Viewing with Log Viewer
  • Really rapid C++ development with KDevelop4
  • Remove columns from text
  • Delete Files from my Linux Trashbin- Solution
  • Jaunty: Apt is broken? Move to another country
  • Linux basics: Learn common commands
  • Enigmail Makes Encrypting Email Easy
  • VMware arrow keys issues
  • Install Android Fonts (ttf-droid) on Arch Linux
  • Quick Fix: Black Desktop Background and Lost Icons

W3C Stats, Linux, Mac, and Windows -- Relevant?

Filed under
OS

blog.ibeentoubuntu: The above graph shows the OS stats for W3C since March, 2003. Side-stepping the debate over whether the stats are an accurate representation of the OS share, I'd like to look at the trends.

Midori: Extremely Fast and Standards-Compliant

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: Midori is a lightweight GTK web browser which uses the popular WebKit rendering engine. I installed it on my Eee PC netbook to see if it could replace Firefox for light browsing.

5 Compiz Effects That Are Actually Useful

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: Compiz has a lot of nice effects that are mostly useless. In my quest to find a work place without distraction compiz effects doesn’t really fit it. Here are five effects that I actually found useful:

Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition: A Big Thumbs Up

Filed under
Reviews

linuxtoday.com/blog: I prefer a direct approach: show me. Which "Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition: A Pain-Free, Project-Based, Get-Things-Done Guidebook" does in a most excellent fashion.

Compile source code - and solve problems

Filed under
HowTos

tuxradar.com: Building software from source - that's a bit old-school, isn't it? Who wants to wrestle with the command line, hunting down dependencies and coaxing the GCC compiler into running properly?

Advocacy at the Speed of Light

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org/blog: The latest course on the menu is, of course, the Linux.com site. This one is the fun one, because we've opened it up to the community to lend their ideas. Here's the top 5 thus far:

The beauty of Free Software Development and Free Software Community

Filed under
OSS

anoopjohn.com: When you work in the software industry, either in the services sector, or in the products sector, you never get to see the harmony, the cooperation and the amiability that, you find in the Free Software Community.

Popcorn - Popularity Contest (for RPM)

Filed under
Software

stick.gk2.sk/blog: A few days ago I came across Feature #305877. What is it about? Well, Debian has the Popularity Contest, which tracks installed packages, how often they are used and sends an anonymized report once a week to their server.

Linux's dirty little secret: Uninstall

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: Go to the Fedora Project Wiki and search for "uninstall Fedora." You won't find anything. Go to Ubuntu's official documentation site and search for "uninstall Ubuntu." You won't find anything.

Test Drive Firefox 3.1 Beta 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

tombuntu.com: Today Mozilla released the third beta for the next major Firefox update, version 3.1. The most significant upgrade coming in Firefox 3.1 - Firefox 3.1 performed 1.6 times faster than Firefox 3.

Novell’s SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 Netbook Surprise

Filed under
SUSE

thevarguy.com: Novell has found a creative way to put Netbooks and SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 in the hands of IT managers and channel partners — even with Microsoft sitting in the same room.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.9.13

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.13 kernel. All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.4.52 Linux 4.10.1

OSS Leftovers

  • What motivates the open-source community?
    Many of us will have been involved in a free-software community that ran out of steam, and either ended up moribund or just plain died. Some of us will have gone through such cycles more than once; it's never nice to watch something that used to be a vibrant community in its death throes. Knowing what motivates the sort of people who get heavily involved in free software projects is really useful when trying to keep them motivated, and a systematic approach to understanding this is what Rina Jensen, Strategist at Mozilla, talked about at FOSDEM 2017. Mozilla talks a lot about promoting innovation and opportunity on the web, and the organization does care a lot about those objectives, but the realities of day-to-day life can interfere and make working toward them tedious. The thinking was that if Mozilla could help make the experience for contributors better, then the contributors could make Mozilla better — but doing that required understanding how things could be better for contributors.
  • Shuttle Music Player is now Open Source
    Music is a major part of everyone’s life, and our smartphones allow us to truly enjoy our music anywhere. Over the years, Android has received a fair share of excellent music player apps, and Shuttle Music Player has managed to stand out. Shuttle is a music player following Google’s Material Design guidelines, and its listing is nearing 4 Million downloads. Currently, the app offers two versions: free and paid. The paid version is priced at $0.99 and has received over 50 thousand downloads on the Play Store already.
  • OpenStack isn’t dead. It’s boring. That’s a good thing.
    The first OpenStack Project Teams Gathering (PTG) event was held this week in Atlanta. The week was broken into two parts: cross-project work on Monday and Tuesday, and individual projects Wednesday through Friday. I was there for the first two days and heard a few discussions that started the same way.
  • NetBSD 7.1_RC2 available
  • NetBSD 7.1 RC2 Released
    The second release candidate to the upcoming NetBSD 7.1 is now available for testing. NetBSD 7.1 RC2 is primarily comprised of fixes since 7.1 RC1, and in particular, security fixes. The raw list of NetBSD 7.1 changes can be found here.
  • Pentagon Launches Open-Source Experiment
    With a new website showcasing federal software code, the Pentagon is the latest government entity to join the open-source movement. The Defense Department this week launched Code.mil, a public site that will eventually showcase unclassified code written by federal employees. Citizens will be able to use that code for personal and public projects. Code written by government employees can be shared with the public because that material usually isn't covered by copyright protections in the U.S., according to the Pentagon.
  • Coder Dojo: Kids Teaching Themselves Programming
    Despite not much advertising, word has gotten around and we typically have 5-7 kids on Dojo nights, enough that all the makerspace's Raspberry Pi workstations are filled and we sometimes have to scrounge for more machines for the kids who don't bring their own laptops. A fun moment early on came when we had a mentor meeting, and Neil, our head organizer (who deserves most of the credit for making this program work so well), looked around and said "One thing that might be good at some point is to get more men involved." Sure enough -- he was the only man in the room! For whatever reason, most of the programmers who have gotten involved have been women. A refreshing change from the usual programming group. (Come to think of it, the PEEC web development team is three women. A girl could get a skewed idea of gender demographics, living here.) The kids who come to program are about 40% girls.
  • Microsoft hasn't turned a phone into a PC just yet [Ed: copying GNU/Linux again]
    Using the Lapdock wired to the X3 charges the phone and provides the most reliable connection for Continuum. I found the wireless connection made things a little unreliable and choppy on some more graphically intense things like full-screen video playback. Connecting the phone is as simple as just plugging it in and watching a Windows 10 desktop burst to life on the Lapdock. While the Windows 10 desktop looks familiar, this is exactly when I realized just how limited Continuum really is. There’s a Start Menu that’s basically the home screen of a Windows phone, and access to Cortana, but there’s a lot missing. Things like putting apps side by side simply don’t exist in this Continuum world, nor do a lot of the typical places you’d right-click on apps or use keyboard shortcuts to get to the desktop. If you’re a Windows power user like me, or even if you’re just used to a standard window management system, it’s immediately frustrating.

today's howtos

UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more