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Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox OS sinks its teeth into low-end smartphones Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 9:15pm
Story grep-2.17 released Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 9:05pm
Story Mesa 10.1 Should Make It Into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 8:59pm
Story Making the case for the non-techie to jump into Linux Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 8:50pm
Story Raspberry Pi: giant hacks for a tiny board Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 8:43pm
Story 5 ways open source is transforming tech in 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 8:36pm
Story Chrome OS Myths Debunked Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 8:19pm
Story Windows phone is dead? Nokia is testing Android in India Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 8:09pm
Story KDE Software Down Under Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 7:59pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 2:57pm

Gentoo 2008.1 Release Solutions

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Daniel Robbins: Gentoo seems to be having problems with .”1” releases – 2007.1 was cancelled and now 2008.1 has been cancelled. The Gentoo project has also announced a desire to move to a more “back to basics approach” where they are doing weekly builds of Gentoo stages. Good idea.

On-line applications "just work"; why worry about the freedom of the licence? An increasing number of computer users are turning to online applications instead of ones on their desktop. It started with webmail and has moved to productivity/office tools. With the emergence of online applications that have no desktop equivalent, and mobile devices that are browsers in your pocket, things are looking up. But what about free software?

Dabbling in OpenSolaris

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OS Recently, I have had the chance to dabble a bit in OpenSolaris while working on a particular server installation. OpenSolaris, as you may know, is the recently open-sourced version of Sun's Solaris OS, which in turn is one of the many flavours of Unix.

Trying Linux on your Windows system

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Linux A Windows user who wants to evaluate Linux, or any other alternative operating system, on their current system has a large number of options. In this article, we will look at those options for the busy Windows user who is evaluating Linux, wants to use open source applications, but doesn't want to lose access to their Windows system.

Do-it-yourself Konqueror commands

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HowTos KDE's Konqueror is as multifunctional as a Swiss Army knife. It works as both a file manager and a Web browser, and you can enhance it even further by adding new commands to its repertoire by means of service menus.

KOffice 2.0 Beta1 Released

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Software The KOffice team is proud to announce the first beta of KOffice 2.0. The goal of this release is to gather feedback from both users and developers on the new UI and underlying infrastructure. This will allow us to release a usable 2.0 release.

Ten easy ways to attract women to your free software project

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The gender inequality among developers and supporters of free software is stunning. Less than 2% of us are women, according to studies conducted for the European Commission. Why? The evidence says we’re driving them away. There are even some pretty good published guidelines on how not to drive them away. What’s missing is a practical implementation strategy: here I present ten relatively simple changes in how you run your project, to make it more attractive to would-be contributors—especially women.

Debian all business with Lenny and Squeeze

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Linux Steve McIntyre knew he faced a huge task when he took on the job of Debian project leader nearly six months ago. But he didn't reckon on the scandal of a major security bug, followed by a massive clear-up operation within a few days of taking over.

Interview: David Tosh of Elgg, The Open Source Social Networking Platform

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Interviews A little over a month ago, Elgg 1.0 was introduced to the world. In this newest release, several years in the making, the software has been improved from the inside out. We recently had the opportunity to follow up on our original interview with one of Elgg's founders, David Tosh. We talked about where Elgg stands today and what plans they have for the future.

Is Chrome a security risk?

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blogs.zdnet: An e-mail came in from her administrator around mid-day which she decided to share with me. It told all users to shut down Chrome. The e-mail called Chrome a security risk.

Also: Iron, a private version of Chromium from Germany

Adobe Talks Open Source, Innovation and the Future of Flash

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Interviews Kevin Lynch, CTO of Adobe talks with eWEEK about open-sourcing Flash, the new Adobe Creative Suite 4 (CS4), mobile technology and more. Lynch also talks of competing with Microsoft Silverlight and Expression and possibly with Google Chrome.

Red Hat’s profitable quarter ‘a mixed hat,’ analyst says

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Linux Jefferies & Company analyst Katherine Egbert didn’t care much for Red Hat’s quarterly earnings report Wednesday, even though the Linux software-focused firm reported profits that exceeded Wall Street expectations.

Overhauled tabbed browsing for Firefox 3.1

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Moz/FF Firefox 3.1 may well be remembered as the “tab release”, as tabbed browsing will be the most noticeable updated area users will face when it comes out in final form.

A brief history of computers and free software: where is the money? The world of computers has changed. Sub-notebooks are becoming immensely popular, mobile phones based on Google’s Android software are about to come out , and computers are looking increasingly like small devices that fit in our pockets. What does this mean for the (free and non-free) software industry? Where will the market (and the money) be?

ASUS Eee PC 901 Linux Boot Performance

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Hardware With netbooks and their users often on the go though, for those not using the suspend and resume mode the boot time can be equally important as the in-desktop performance. To look at this we are delivering boot performance benchmarks for the Eee PC 901 from Fedora 9, Fedora 10, Ubuntu 8.10, and Mandriva 2009.

9 tips for Ubuntu notebook users

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Ubuntu Here are some tips for Ubuntu users who use notebook computers. All are taken from my brand new book Ubuntu Kung Fu, which contains over 300 other fun and useful tips for Ubuntu.

Battle of the Linux Distros

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Linux Today we're taking a look at the real differences between three popular distributions of open-source software, and offering our readers their chance to weigh in on why they like their own particular open-source OS.

Dell confirms 12in netbook? MID? Tablet?

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Hardware Dell has confirmed it is indeed working on a 12in netbook-style laptop, as UK grocer Tesco recently let slip on its website. If Tesco is to be believed - 1GB of memory, a 40GB hard drive, and Ubuntu Linux.

Mandriva Linux 2009 RC2 is available

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MDV Mandriva Linux 2009 RC 2 (code name Sophie) should be available on public mirrors now (or in the coming hours)... 2009 announces successful miniconferences

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Linux (PR): LCA miniconferences have become a feature of The papers committee selected the best miniconfs from a number of wide-ranging areas at their annual selections panel meeting this week.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.